Advertisement

Archive for Monday, November 24, 2008

Go!

Acupuncture adopted by patients seeking new types of treatment

Dr. Mehdi Khosh, N.D., secures acupuncture needles into Teresa Gordon’s legs at Khosh’s Natural Medical Care, 4824 Quail Crest Place. Khosh and his brother, Farhang, both naturopathic doctors born in Iran, emphasize prevention of disease, maintenance of optimal health, and promotion of the individual’s inherent self-healing process.

Dr. Mehdi Khosh, N.D., secures acupuncture needles into Teresa Gordon’s legs at Khosh’s Natural Medical Care, 4824 Quail Crest Place. Khosh and his brother, Farhang, both naturopathic doctors born in Iran, emphasize prevention of disease, maintenance of optimal health, and promotion of the individual’s inherent self-healing process.

November 24, 2008

Advertisement

Jim Kreider says he stands half an inch taller than he did two years ago. “That tells me something obviously is happening differently in my body,” says Kreider, a Lawrence resident and clinical social worker.

Once a sufferer of frequent colds, chronic severe pain and sleepless nights, Kreider turned to acupuncture several years ago and now attributes it and other therapies to his improved health and taller stature.

“This is making a difference in my body,” he says.

Acupuncture and other types of complementary and alternative medicine, such as massage therapy and meditation therapy, are growing areas in health care as consumers seek new ways to heal.

“The trends are positive and they continue to increase each year,” says Deena Khosh, a naturopathic doctor and research assistant professor at the Kansas University Medical Center and KU Hospital, where faculty and staff are expanding an integrative medicine program that will offer acupuncture and other services.

Khosh says the movement is consumer-driven.

“People are starting to take an active role in their health,” she says. “They’re wanting to do things on their own to help improve their health.”

That’s one reason Kreider turned to acupuncture. Kreider says he has been diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome, a gastrointestinal disorder and fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition. He has sought the help of a slew of professionals, but couldn’t find relief.

About five years ago, he turned to Natural Medical Care, 4824 Quail Crest Place, a Lawrence clinic specializing in natural medicine.

Kreider now takes herbal supplements and undergoes monthly acupuncture treatment. He also sees a massage therapist and a rolfer, who specializes in soft tissue manipulation. He says these treatments complement his use of traditional Western medicine, and the combination works for him. He believes he stands a bit taller now because the treatments have reduced the tension in some of his muscles.

“I don’t have to nap just to get through the day,” he says. “My sleep has improved. I’m not having multiple colds or rounds of flu as I had before.”

Kreider says he used to rate his pain as a 7 out of 10. Now he says it is about a 2. Acupuncture is an ancient treatment that aims to restore health through the stimulation of specific points on the body.

“The body is a seen as a delicate balance of two opposing and at the same time inseparable forces — yin and yang,” says Farhang Khosh, Kreider’s naturopathic doctor at Natural Medical Care and Deena Khosh’s spouse. “Self is achieved only by maintaining the body in a balanced state between yin and yang.”

Khosh also treats patients through clinical nutrition, homeopathy, herbal supplements and lifestyle counseling. Khosh says he takes a detailed history of patients, taking into account such things as their diet, sleeping patterns and stress level.

“We are trying to find the cause of the problem, rather than just treating the problem,” he says.

Comments

BuffyloGal 5 years, 4 months ago

How many coma patients complain much about anything bozo?

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

BuffyloGal-- How many coma patients complain of chronic back pain?

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

Anonymous: "With perhaps a handful of notable ( medical ) exceptions, improvements in human health, generally, are attributable to improvements in environmental quality ( sanitation, food supply, etc. ) .Buffy: Penicillin cures pneumonia even if you’re in a coma. And penicillin would be one of those noteworthy exceptions.

0

BuffyloGal 5 years, 4 months ago

Penicillin cures pneumonia even if you’re in a coma, but alternative medicine only seems to work when you are awake. You have to know (or think) you’re being treated. And penicillin works by well-understood scientific principles, while much of alternative medicine is based on “entire physiologic systems or physical forces that the average high school science teacher already knew didn’t exist.” If any alternative treatment clearly worked as well as penicillin, prior plausibility wouldn’t matter: science would adopt it and worry about how it worked later.Bausell emphasizes that CAM nourishes hope, and its placebos work, if only for symptoms that would eventually resolve on their own anywayFindings from: Snake Oil Science: The Truth About Complementary & Alternative Medicine by R. Barker Bausell. He is a research methodologist: he designs and analyzes research studies for a living. Not only that: he was intimately involved with acupuncture research for the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

"... acupuncture worked just as well as the antidepressant Effexor... [ in breast cancer patients ] . Women who received acupuncture also reported fewer side effects and more energy, and some reported an increased sex drive, compared to women who used Effexor, the study showed."http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/22/acupuncture-offers-relief-for-breast-cancer-patients/ "...Common side effects [ of Effexor ] ...NOTE: The percentage of occurrences for each side effect listed comes from clinical trial data provided by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Inc. The percentages indicate the percentage of people that experienced the side effect in clinical trials.Nausea (21-35%)Headache (34%)ApathyConstipationOngoing Irritable Bowel SyndromeDizziness (11-20%)FatigueInsomnia (15-23%)VertigoDry mouth (12-16%)Sexual dysfunction (14-34%)Sweating (10-14%)Orthostatic hypotension (postural drop in blood pressure)Vivid/Abnormal dreams (3-7%)Impulsive ActionsIncreased blood pressureDecreased Appetite (8-20%)Electric shock-like sensations also called "Brain zaps"Increased anxiety at the start of treatmentAkathisia (Agitation) (3-4%)Memory Loss...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effexor_xr

0

BrianR 5 years, 4 months ago

Well, it looks like we've arrived at the conclusion that there is no panacea. It has positive effects for some people for some problems, just like every other remedy.

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

Frador, if you look at overall medical outcomes, the primary advantage that allopathic medicine offers over others is in emergency care. I suspect that the vast majority of acupuncturists and homeopathic physicians have no intentions of taking on such cases.But true to the capitalist ideals in which allopathic medicine is rooted, with the possible exception of emergency treatment, profitability determines the course of treatment as much as, if not more than, the anticipated outcome.Is acupuncture a cure-all? Likely not, and as it's subjected to scientific scrutiny, we'll likely learn more about what medical value it really has. At this point, all we can say for certain is that an acupuncturist's placebo effect is just as effective as that of an allopath.

0

frador 5 years, 4 months ago

If you look at the clinical trials of acupuncture, you'll notice that as the trials get better and the sample groups get larger, any "effect" decreases; a sure sign of there being no true effect. That said, this is a terrible article. How about talking to a "doctor" trained in the medicine that allows us to live longer now than ever in human history. If you have a serious, life-threatening disease, are you going to go to an acupuncturist? Or to a real doctor? And if ancient treatments are truly superior, why isn't bleeding more popular? You could spare the expense of a medical doctor and just go to the barber.

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

All that really indicates is that acupuncture may not be effective with migraines. Given that there are clinical trials that show that's effective with other conditions, I'd say you're jumping to an unsupported conclusion.

0

BuffyloGal 5 years, 4 months ago

"Guess what? It doesn’t matter where you put the needle. It doesn’t matter whether you use a needle at all. In the best controlled studies, only one thing mattered: whether the patients believed they were getting acupuncture. If they believed they got the real thing, they got better pain relief — whether they actually got acupuncture or not! If they got acupuncture but believed they didn’t, it didn’t work. If they didn’t get it but believed they did, it did work. A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association compared the experiences of 302 people suffering from migraines who received either acupuncture, sham acupuncture (needles inserted at non-acupuncture points), or no acupuncture. During the study, the patients kept headache diaries. Subjects were “blind” to which experimental group they were in; the evaluators also did not know whose diary they were reading. Professional acupuncturists administered both the acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatments. Interestingly, although 51 percent of the acupuncture group showed a reduction in headache days by half (compared to 15 percent in the control group), but 53 percent of the sham acupuncture group had a 50 percent reduction in headache days!"Want more? http://drspinello.com/altmed/acuvet/acuvet_files/frame.htm(Since qi originally referred to the steam or odor coming off of food, and nothing to do with souls or pressure points, I will go to my kitchen for my ancient Chinese dinner that needs to be prepared.)

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

There are a large number of medical conditions for which there is no cure, but that doesn't mean there aren't treatments. Some of those treatments are allopathic; others derive from other healing traditions.I've had acupuncture done a few times, and while it didn't "cure" my ailment, it most certainly relieved some of the symptoms, and to my knowledge, that's what most practitioners aim to accomplish. As the study I cited above shows, acupuncture can successfully relieve certain types of chronic pain, and that's nothing to sneeze at.

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

_4_ : "... at least you're spelling 'Cthulhu' correctly now.",;-Dso I see. botched it earlier. ( must have used up all my h's in that earlier side effects post. ) tho' i've noticed you've been leaving some letters out of my name, as well.( sensitive about his name, that cthulhu )

0

BrianR 5 years, 4 months ago

Come to think of it, just holding a pint of Boddington's Pub Ale makes me feel better.

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

ok, that's nice. Well at least you're spelling "Cthulhu" correctly now.

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

tan: Just curious, what do you mean by "encapsulated"?

0

Flap Doodle 5 years, 4 months ago

Tinitus is all in my head.....

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

Buffy: "I'm not challenging the medical community - I'm challenging superstitious nonsense disguised as medical practice."I am challenging the medical community... not the least of which is all that encapsulated nonsense, dispensed under the guise of "medical practice."

0

Windlass 5 years, 4 months ago

Dangerous prescription medications that kill people. It's no better than a Third World disease. How's it going to be when there are no more people to kill for that profit?

0

BuffyloGal 5 years, 4 months ago

snap - "for a couple of days" is the whole point of my argument. It doesn't last, it doesn't work and it is all in your head!I'm not challenging the medical community - I'm challenging superstitious nonsense disguised as medical practice.

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

tan: I honestly don't know if you're right (and I don't think you do either), but the comment is a little off base from what I was talking about, which is the scientific validity of the practices I had mentioned.However, I would argue that the concept of sanitation is a serious medical advance, as the concept came to light with the advance of the germ-disease theory at the late 19th and early 20th century.

0

Flap Doodle 5 years, 4 months ago

I've had very good results from acupuncture. Sometimes, it can completely turn off the tinitus in my right ear for a couple of days. Nothing else has ever do that.

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

With perhaps a handful of notable ( medical ) exceptions, improvements in human health, generally, are attributable to improvements in environmental quality ( sanitation, food supply, etc. ) .

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

tan: I see your point, but the logic may be a little flawed. Any substance is a toxin as long as it's "measured" in the right amount. Ever heard of water intoxication?Also, if we're listing out every nasty side-effect that doctors in labs have been responsible for, isn't it also fair to include all of the illnesses that they have treated? The day that acupuncture/ homeopathy/ reflexology/ chiropracty is definitively shown to cure ONE disease or illness, I will eat my words. Until then, if I have to choose between medicine and magic, I choose medicine.

0

salad 5 years, 4 months ago

I've had acupuncture a number of times for back pain. One time it didn't do anything, one time it helped a little, but the time I had it done by this old chinese guy it worked far better than any western medicine ever could have. I was amazed, especially since i had such low expectations and I was in such agony. I think it depends on the practitioner greatly, but acupuncture really CAN work.

0

Windlass 5 years, 4 months ago

I think healthcare is a whole lot of bogus crap. Any doctor can write a prescription and just keep you sick forever from the mountain of side effects. I'm glad that I figured out early how on my own I would be.

0

BrianR 5 years, 4 months ago

People have some interesting unfounded biases against things that challenge the medical community in any way.

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

... measured toxins, replete with placebo ( and other lovely ) effect(s).

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

bozo: the placebo effect is a wonderful thing. Especially for the therapist's wallet. If any of these mechanisms that the therapist speaks of (yin/yang/chi/ blah blah) actually exist, and he could prove it, he would be a Nobel winner instantly! But why would you want that Stockholm piece of garbage when you could stick needles in people's skin for money?tan: ?

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

I'll take a skilled chiropractor over a lifelong debilitating surgeon, any day.

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

Not so, BuffyloGal--http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6794/is_/ai_n28387702A review of acupuncture clinical trials indexed during 2005"Methods We conducted a search of PubMed and Embase for clinical trials of acupuncture with date of entry 2005, and selected randomised controlled trials with clinical outcomes for review. Where possible, the original report was read for full details.Results Thirty-eight RCTs were found from databases, and one more during the process of the study. Ten of the trials included about 100 patients or more. Five showed acupuncture to be superior to usual care in back pain, knee pain and headache. Acupuncture was superior to placebo for chronic knee pain, but not for fibromyalgia, or post-stroke rehabilitation. Acupuncture was not as good as conventional analgesia for oocyte collection.Conclusion The role of acupuncture is becoming more precisely established in treatment of chronic knee pain, back pain and headache. Acupuncture for chronic back pain is more cost-effective than many other medical interventions."

0

BuffyloGal 5 years, 4 months ago

There are clinical studies that say that if the patient believes it will work, it will work. This is no more than placebo medicine. There are no clinical studies that prove it does anything. What next homeopathy?To suggest it is an ancient treatment is also a farce. Ask yourself when modern man was able to make steel needles as small as the ones required for this procedure. Then educate yourself about Chairman Mao's cheap health plan alternative and you'll find out just how ancient it is. I can't wait for tomorrow's article on chiropractors.

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

...abortion, acne, birth defects, black or tarry stool, boils, bruises, changes in skin coloration, inability to speak, infection of hair follicles, infertility, inflammation of the gums or mouth, lung disease, menstrual problems, partial or complete paralysis, rash or itching, red patches on skin, sensitivity to light, sore throat, stomach intestinal ulcers bleeding, stomach pain, vaginal discharge, vomiting blood, impotence, infection, joint pain, loss of sexual desire, muscular pain, severe allergic reaction, shortness of breath, sudden death, lack or loss of appetite, stomach distress, bluish discoloration of the skin, skin rash, blood disorders, blood in the urine, bloody diarrhea, drowsiness, hallucinations, hearing loss, inability to fall or stay asleep, intestinal inflammation, itchy skin eruptions, kidney disorders, lack of muscle coordination, loss of hair, mental depression, raised rash, skin discoloration, skin disorders, spinal cord defects, swelling around the eye, urine discoloration, abdominal cramps, constipation, gas, heavy menstrual bleeding, menstrual disorder, menstrual pain or cramps, paleness, spotting (light bleeding between menstrual periods), aching, inflamed joints, anal or genital sores with fungus infection, anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), anemia, appetite loss, bulging of soft spots in infants' heads, decreased hearing, difficulty swallowing, discoloration of children's teeth, fever, inflammation of the penis, inflammation of the intestines, inflammation of the tongue, kidney or liver failure, skin coloration, skin eruptions, skin inflammation peeling, throat irritation, thyroid glproblems, anorexia, glossitis, dysphagia, enterocolitis, inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the anogenital region, esophagitis, esophageal ulcerations, maculopapular erythematous rashes, Exfoliative dermatitis, photosensitivity, rise in BUN, urticaria, angioneurotic edema, anaphylactoid purpura, serum sickness, pericarditis, exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus, Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, eosinophilia, bulging fontanels in infants intracranial hypertension in adults... should not be taken by persons with human physiology.

0

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago

cthulu: "No, that's what doctor's with medical degrees are trying to do in labs everyday."... may cause abdominal pain upset, depression, diarrhea, dizziness, fatigue, headache, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, ringing in the ears, sleepiness or excessive drowsiness, stomach upset, vertigo, vomiting, anxiety, asthma, behavior disturbances, bloating, blurred vision, breast changes, changes in heart rate, chest pain, coma, congestive heart failure, convulsions, decrease in white blood cells, fluid in lungs, fluid retention, flushing, hair loss, hepatitis, high or low blood pressure, itching, increase in blood sugar, insomnia, labored breathing, light-headedness, loss of appetite, mental confusion, nosebleed, peptic ulcer, problems in hearing, rectal bleeding, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (skin peeling), stomach or intestinal bleeding, sweating, twitching, unusual redness of skin, vaginal bleeding, weight gain, worsening of epilepsy, yellow eyes skin, mood changes, personality changes, psychotic behavior, severe depression, it may worsen any existing emotional instability, may cause fluid retention high blood pressure, eye problems may develop (e.g., a viral or fungal eye infection, cataracts, Cushing's syndrome, marked by weight gain, a ``moon-faced'' appearance, thin, fragile skin, brittle bones, purplish stripe marks on the skin, bone fractures, bruising, bulging eyes, distended abdomen, face redness, glaucoma, hives other allergic-type reactions, increased pressure inside eyes or skull, inflamed esophagus or pancreas, irregular menstrual periods, muscle weakness or disease, osteoporosis, poor healing of wounds, stunted growth (in children), thin, chills fever, decreased resistance to infection, general feeling of illness, mouth ulcers...

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

cthulhu_4_president-- Actually, there have been a number of clinical studies of acupuncture, and they have shown that it can be effective, although the exact mechanisms at work are not yet well understood.

0

cthulhu_4_president 5 years, 4 months ago

Complete nonsense, with no scientific proof to back up the claim of these "healers". They are modern-day snake oil salesmen who keep people who may need serious medical help away from the doctors who could help them and sucking their wallets dry at the same time.Says the scumsucking healer: "“We are trying to find the cause of the problem, rather than just treating the problem,” No, that's what doctor's with medical degrees are trying to do in labs everyday.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.