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Archive for Thursday, May 29, 2008

Royals suffer devastating loss to Twins

Minnesota's Craig Monroe hits a three-run home run to cap the Twins' improbable five-run rally in the ninth inning. The Twins handed the Royals their 10th straight loss on Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo.

Minnesota's Craig Monroe hits a three-run home run to cap the Twins' improbable five-run rally in the ninth inning. The Twins handed the Royals their 10th straight loss on Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo.

May 29, 2008

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— This one hit the Kansas City Royals like a sucker punch to the belly and perhaps planted the seeds of an ugly clubhouse rebellion.

Craig Monroe's three-run homer with two out in the ninth capped a five-run rally, then Justin Morneau hit a leadoff homer in the 10th to lift Minnesota to a 9-8 victory Wednesday night and stun the Royals with their 10th straight loss.

Afterward, Royals outfielder Jose Guillen let loose in the clubhouse a profanity-filled denunciation of unnamed teammates.

"Too many babies here," Guillen stormed while seated in front of his locker and spicing his language with obscenity. "They don't know how to play the game and win the game right, the way it's supposed to be played. And that's the problem here. Now I know why this organization's been losing for a while. Now I know."

Guillen was incensed that anyone might blame the loss on manager Trey Hillman, whose late-game decisions included leaving Joel Peralta in to face Morneau in the 10th after he had allowed Monroe's pinch homer in the ninth.

"He cares more than anyone here about winning," Guillen said. "That guy cares. Every single day. It's killing him."

Guillen declined to name players he felt were not doing their share.

"We've just got to be smart and know what we need to do to win games," he said. "That's it. There's too many guys that won't do this, do that, like they've given up, like they don't care."

While Guillen spoke forcefully, Peralta's voice hardly rose above a whisper.

"I've faced (Monroe) before," he said. "I just made a mistake. Fell behind in the count and had to throw a strike and - home run."

The 10-game skid started on May 19 in Boston and is Kansas City's longest since a 13-game slide May 12-25, 2006.

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