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Archive for Monday, July 21, 2008

State asks universities to prepare for budget cuts of 7 percent over two years

Grim budget times for the state could translate into substantial budget cuts at KU. The Kansas Board of Regents requested all state universities trim budgets by 7 percent.

July 21, 2008, 5:21 p.m. Updated July 21, 2008, 7:45 p.m.

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Kansas University is staring down the barrel of "painful" staff cuts and program eliminations.

Provost Richard Lariviere announced late Monday that the state has asked regents universities to cut budgets by up to 7 percent during the next two years.

The state budget officer has requested that 2 percent, or $5.5 million, be cut from KU's budget this year and another 5 percent, or $9.2 million, be cut from the proposed 2009-10 budget. The figures include an internal reallocation of $2.6 million in 2008-09 and $4.5 million in 2009-10 to address expected higher energy costs, he said.

Lariviere said he was encouraging university leadership to avoid cuts in "key instructional programs" and major research projects. However, he said it would be impossible to make cuts this large without having some sort of harmful effect on everyone involved.

"Students will be affected by any major cuts we have to endure," he said. "We're here for the students, so when the university's budget is cut, the students are affected."

Regent Dan Lykins said the board wasn't looking forward to the cuts it was going to have to make as it began to look not just at KU's budget, but all the other schools which fall under the regents' direction.

"It's not like we have a lot of fat to trim off anywhere," Lykins said. "We'll be cutting into some bone."

This is the first time the state has asked for major budget cuts since 2002 when KU took a $7.1 million hit. As a result, the university cut 54 positions and the Museum of Anthropology shut its doors. Tuition also saw a 25 percent tuition jump, with an in-state student paying $2,921 compared to $2,333 the previous year.

Lariviere said it did not appear that the budget shuffling would affect current tuition.

The majority of the cuts likely will be made in the administrative areas, he said, which means that the university would be forced to cut at least some employee positions. He said it was too early to guess at numbers.

"There's no way we can't cut some employee positions and services," he said.

University spokeswoman Lynn Bretz said KU would look at each area before recommending cuts. Meanwhile, Lariviere said he was asking KU leaders to cut entire projects rather than simply trimming from each area.

"It will be painful," he said. "However, this is to stop cuts from occurring across the board."

Bretz later announced that libraries, student financial aid and utilities would be sheltered from the cuts.

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius announced in June that all state-funded areas would have to tighten their belts as the state's economy continued to slump.

University officials are expected to have proposed cuts to the Board of Regents for review before their retreat Aug. 19-21 in Wichita.

Comments

morganalefay 5 years, 9 months ago

"So rather than get mad at Lew for doing his job maybe people should get mad at the donors who would rather give money to the athletics department than the school. This is probably falling on deaf ears but I am really just tired of people blasting athletic departments."I've always been weirded out by people who would donate money to an athletic dept. instead of "educational programs" at the university. Some of those folks also like to build fancy fountains with their names on them.Now wouldn't it be nice if Lew took an example from Joe Pa (Penn State) and Joe Pa's just the coach. While I was a student at Penn State Joe Pa funded an entire wing of the library, doubling it in size and improving its facilities significantly. He also benched any athlete who fell below a 2.5 or 3.0 GPA. You can "do your job" as an athletic director or you can become actively involved in the improvement of academics at the institution your teams play for, like Joe Pa has since he started coaching for Penn State in the 60s.Oh yeah...someone asked "didn't all state employees just get like a 7 percent raise?"I sure didn't. In fact, most people see at least a cost of living "raise." I wonder what that's like. Every now and then they say that we get that, but it varies from year to year, depending on how much this state is willing to spend on education.

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Pogo 5 years, 9 months ago

Do the correct budget adjustments include less use of private jet air craft for jaunts?

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yourworstnightmare 5 years, 9 months ago

I just read in Science magazine that the top two "feeder schools" for Ph.D. students in the sciences in the USA are two schools in Beijing, China. Cal-Berkeley is third. A school in Seoul, South Korea is fourth.http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/321/5886/185That American students don't enter careers in the sciences shows our priorities and where we place our dollars.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Well prepare for a tuition increase, but 3-5% is viewed as just covering the cost of business from year to year. Also with guaranteed tuition that means that there will be a need for the losses they have from the two groups already in the compact. This will mean at the bare minimum and 10-12% increase next year. Also remember they project the rate for 4 years, which might push it back to the percentage increases that came about in the five year plan.

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yourworstnightmare 5 years, 9 months ago

Better get ready for a 7% tuition increase.KU needs to maintain its course of improvement, and state budget cuts will (and should) lead directly to higher tuition.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Just ask Nebraska how well the consolidation works. They are affiliated in much the same manner, but each campus (Kearney, Omaha, Lincoln, Med Center, and Technical Ag). Funny thing is that KU is the only member of the regents with a Chancellor and the rest have Presidents. However, all the components in the Nebraska system have Chancellors.

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gccs14r 5 years, 9 months ago

The regents universities should be consolidated into one university with multiple campuses. That would get rid of 5 chancellor salaries.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

The only problem is that even if the vote would have passed, Bob would have had to then present it to the BOR for the cut. I sincerely doubt he would ever do that even if Senate passed the cut. Senate has the power over fees, but unfortunately they still have to go to the BOR for approval/disapproval. I just remember the last time when it was $20 getting and a cut was proposed. A subtle message was passed along that it would never be presented.Ya the fee was presented under questionable means and the voting was just as suspicious. However, I am sure the same discussion would be happening if the International Scholarship Fee (that ran at the same time as the SUA fee on referendum) would have actually passed.

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Bubarubu 5 years, 9 months ago

"every student paid the transpo fee, but still had to buy a bus pass/pay their $1 to ride the bus. Actually, looking down the line at pretty much any fee and you see that they just exist to subsidize costs, but do not give 100% access to that entity"The difference is that every student had access. The fees don't require that fee-funded services be available without additional cost, just that they be available. The boathouse does not meet that condition.As for taking on the fee at this point, the bill failed by one vote in the Student Senate finance committee (11-6, 2/3 needed to pass), and there are questions about the way the fee was presented two years ago. Student Senate should be taking on this issue.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Actually, this year's attempt was quite funny. The idea that fees go to programs that are open to the entire student body just does not occur. Prior to this year's vote on all access transportation, every student paid the transpo fee, but still had to buy a bus pass/pay their $1 to ride the bus. Actually, looking down the line at pretty much any fee and you see that they just exist to subsidize costs, but do not give 100% access to that entity (Watkins and Rec Center have additional charges for certain services).Regardless, The KU Women and Non-Revenue Sports Fee is often the easiest to go after because of the massive budget KUAC has available. Even when it was at $20 it was the target of attempts to cut it. Also, I guess if the boathouse was such a big deal than the fee should have been taken on before it went to referendum. The increase went to vote under the condition that the money would go to the boathouse.

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Bubarubu 5 years, 9 months ago

"KU Student Senate suggested cutting the Women and Non-Revenue Sports Fee this year and KUAC went ballistic. In fact, it is a threat that comes up every few years, but is often pointed out that student ticket prices are low"One of the conditions for this particular pot of money is that it be used for programs which are open to the entire student body, which is part of the reason KU students get into women's bball, baseball, volleyball, etc. for free. Money from the fee is now being spent on the new boathouse which is not open to the entire student body. I can't speak to previous attempts attempts at getting rid of the fee, but that was the primary justification this time.According to the Student Senate legislation, KUAC collected more than $1.9M from the fee in 2007-08, comprising 2.7% of KUAC's revenue.

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shockchalk 5 years, 9 months ago

Penguin,KU Classified employees did NOT vote to become University employees instead of State employees. They are STILL State employees but their raises are determined by the University instead of being under civil service. This has allowed them to receive much better raises than their couterparts who are still civil service employees. Godot,All of the State employees who voted out of the civil service are very happy that they did so and these cuts won't change that.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Closing all the regionals would be a disaster. Unless enrollments are increased at KU and KSU that would mean having to send 35,000+ students someplace else. If KU and KSU need more money then they have tuition ownership and are free to increase their tuition. This seemed to have no effect on enrollments at other regionals with one exception: FHSU.Since 2002, when the tuition increases started at their fast pace only FHSU has experienced an increase in enrollment. (I guess to be fair ESU has increased by about 150 students, but WSU has dropped 1500, PSU is down about 200). In that time period, FHSU enrollment has gone from 6392 in Fall 2002 to 8,011 in Spring 2008. So increased tuition will seemingly benefit the least expensive of the BOR schools. My only question is why would you want to close a school that keeps growing? In fact, 5.7% (between Spring 07 and Spring 08) compared to the 1.3% growth at KSU and -0.6% growth at KU during that same period.

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LJD230 5 years, 9 months ago

Why is it so hard for folks to realize that Kansas can no longer afford to support the current number of four year institutions, junior colleges and vocational technical schools?If tuition creep is to be avoided for Kansas kids it is necessary to close all but the two major universities and triage those kids who can't cut the mustard to jucos in preparation for a rigorous four year education. And since the value of a college degree is rapidly diminishing, why not make greater use of the vocational technical schools?Another question: why is the leadership at KSU and KU so ineffective in attracting out of state kids to these schools? Does this relate to the quality of education or an incorrect perception of Kansas?

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hawkperchedatriverfront 5 years, 9 months ago

I read well. I hope the KU staff can read as well also, Bloated university! Millions to be cut from KU long overdue. But don't count on it happening.

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Green_Trees_Brown_Dirt 5 years, 9 months ago

I don't know about the details, but Penguin is correct in that the lines are not as black and white as it may seem when the statement is made that Athletics is a "separate entity" from the University. It may appear that way on paper, but in practice money is money and its hard to tell one pot from the other, especially when no one is auditing w/ a fine comb!

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Actually, the KU Student Senate suggested cutting the Women and Non-Revenue Sports Fee this year and KUAC went ballistic. In fact, it is a threat that comes up every few years, but is often pointed out that student ticket prices are low. In the end, nothing actually happened. The fee might not bring in a ton of money, but it is guaranteed money in the bank. So saying that Lew or Bob would just let it go is well shows a lack of information on the issue. I can hardly see Bob presenting the cut to the BOR (which is how the fee would have to be cut).I just wanted to dismiss the claim that there is no connection. I am in no way using it to say that athletics should be targeted because in many ways it is a self-sustaining entity. In many ways they show that if you want something it will require some hard work. They have been out working hard to get money for a new football complex and other facility upgrades. Also for everyone who is angry about the raises for Mangino and Self, well that money is coming from funds raised by KUAC. They noticed areas of need then went out and raised the money to fill those gaps.

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webmocker 5 years, 9 months ago

While I agree with Defender's sentiment, fact checking is in order: "The fact is this:...Inflation is rampant...."U.S. Inflation Rates1980 average rate: 13.58%1990 average rate: 5.39%2000 average rate: 3.38%2007 average rate: 2.85% (2008 data suggests about a 4.5% rate so far.)data from http://inflationdata.com/inflation/Inflation_Rate/HistoricalInflation.aspx

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GSWtotheheart 5 years, 9 months ago

KU staff are still state employees but the control is at the local level instead of the state levelWe are glad to have voted away from civil service because we received across the board and merit raises for years when we hadn't had more than cost-of-living raises for several years. We also can be paid with more than state funds now.Godot-if you work at KU, you're just bitter, probably have an axe to grind, who do you think screwed you over? And if you don't work at KU-you don't know what you're talking about dissing us for voting away from civil service. At least we have retirement, health insurance, sick and vacation leave accrual, flexibility, free training, etc.Show me any other company that needs to make budget cuts do it without laying off staff...because most of the time that's what happens. It hasn't happened at KU in years. I'm not advocating for cutting staff, but it's going to happen.Nobody can seriously think Lew, Mangino, Bill Self, or even the chancellor are going to have their salaries cut. That's not how it happens.

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GSWtotheheart 5 years, 9 months ago

johngalt (Anonymous) says: Maybe ask professors to teach more than 2 classes.There's lots of waste at unversities.Professors have to do research and service too, plus prep for, teach, and then do administrative duties for their classes also. They put their time in, trust me.

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handley 5 years, 9 months ago

The state is asking KU to cut their budget by 7%. So the athletic department gave their coaches big increases in their contracts. That doesn't bode well with the educational department having to cut their's. I know that the athletic department is a whole separate entity and they get their funding from a different source, but KU is still a school and schools are in the business of educating. I don't know how anyone else feels about it but I think we have our priorities a little wrong.

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 5 years, 9 months ago

"This is a small part of their budget, but it is at least $40 per student that cannot just be dismissed."$40 X 29,000 = just under $1.2M; which is a drop in the bucket in comparision to KUAC's overall budget. I'm sure Lew would be OK giving that up, anyway.All you "athletics is the problem" people need to give it a rest. You are poorly informed and speaking from assumption and ignorance.The problem is that we can never do anything about our state's poor economy. We need to do WHATEVER it takes to bring business to Kansas. We will store your waste, we will generate your energy, we will let you raise your pigs and we may even give you the land you need if it will bring decent paying jobs to a state that is barely staying above Mississippi.Beggars can't be choosers. We are in denial about how bad things really are in Kansas, so we need to start making major concessions to potential businesses. I'll support anything short of the sex trade and increasing gaming.And, we need to raise tuition. Besides, every time a university raises it's rates, it attracts a better set of applicants anyway, so it'll help the university's reputation in the end.

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lionheart72661 5 years, 9 months ago

I honestly don't know exactly the monies are distributed at K.U. but maybe it's just me or does anyone else see it? They pay a coach 2.3 million a year to coach a team that yes went to an Orange Bowl then shortly there after talk about cuting programs and jobs. Well is a college football coach really worth 2.3 million a year? I say NO!!! So I believe that they should cut the coaches salary in half (or more) to save higher education. What's more important? Higher education or over paying a coach that may never see another bowl game again? Or K.U. can go pick on another small business!!

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Defender 5 years, 9 months ago

We're all having to cut back. That is what happens in hard times. That is how we get back on track after overextending ourselves. Get over it, it is the human condition.The fact is this: The common man is out of money. Good paying jobs aren't out there. Inflation is rampant. The saving grace of capitalism is self correction. But this self correction can only come if everyone does thier part. Which means that the state cannot continue to expect the common man to give up more and more money. Everyone must pitch in, common man, corporation, and public entity.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

The virtual college classes are largely administered through Blackboard these days. Also they use some ITV for some classes. In addition, they also have paid employees in China. This is especially true in the English courses at the partner schools. I believe they use DVD, but again a lot of their courses in the virtual college are done entirely through blackboard with assignments submitted through digital drop box or email with the prof in charge.Well I couldn't resist posting after being called upon to do so :)

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clyde_never_barks 5 years, 9 months ago

See, I told you penguin would have all the answers!I'm just curious if FHSU has switched over to DVD's or Digital format, from VHS for their so called "virtual college?" It used to be so easy to ship VHS cassettes to China.

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Bubarubu 5 years, 9 months ago

jprich: "If Bubarubu had actually read the title, he/she would have seen that the state is asking "universities" (plural) across the state and not just KU to cut certain programs. With that said, how do these cuts hurt KU and its supposed troubled "image an reputation" anymore than other universities across the state? In fact, as a recent KU graduate, I'd like Bubarubu to explain what gave the university its troubled "image an reputation"?"Yes, "universities" are having to make cuts. The 14.7M specifically outlined in the article is for KU alone. Read, twit. If you need help, "The state budget officer has requested that 2 percent, or $5.5 million, be cut from KU's budget this year..."Now, about reputation, if you're suggesting that my typo is what did it, you're sorely mistaken. I would guess that the very low admission standards combined with years of nationally publicized controversy about K-12 education in this state didn't help. Add to that consistent investment in research and faculty recruitment/retention at other schools and relatively poor support for graduate education, and it's not hard to see how KU's reputation has slipped. Individual programs are excellent, but the University as a whole has an image problem. The paired trends of criticism and scrutiny from lawmakers and decreasing state support for the institution also make things difficult. I believe KU is a fundamentally strong institution, but I'm also not one of the people who would need to be convinced. Cutting more than $14M from the budget over two years will make it harder to do the things KU needs to do to improve.

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Godot 5 years, 9 months ago

Hope alll you KU classified employees who voted to de-couple from the State system of classified employees, thinking that you would get better wages as a result, are happy with your decision. I can guarandamtee you that, when the budget is cut by 7 percent, those who feel the pinch will not be faculty and administrators.

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deskboy04 5 years, 9 months ago

You can't cut administration!

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Godot 5 years, 9 months ago

The only "CUTS" KU needs is the increases in salaries of its administration and top faculty. Cutting salaries of these higher paid elite by just a few percent, multiplied by the bloat of their benefits and perks, will more than satisfy the 7 percent budget cut.If KU eliminates classified staff or reduces their pay to reach this seven percent reduction, every classified staff member, and every citizen who does not work for KU in a "professional" capacity, should revolt, should gather in front of Strong Hall and stymie the functioning of the University until Change is Implemented.Change we can believe in!!!

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Actually, to be completely honest there is a connection between KU and KUAC. Each semester, the Women and Non-Revenue Sports Fee is collected from student fees and given to athletics. Also to be honest, this really just goes into the general athletics budget and is not directly set aside for those sports. This is a student fee so it is in that grey zone of support. However, to say that athletics gets 100% of its own money outside any function of the university is a bit shortsighted. This is a small part of their budget, but it is at least $40 per student that cannot just be dismissed.

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terrapin2 5 years, 9 months ago

srjNO, State employees did NOT just receive a 7% pay raise! The Legislature approved a 2.5% increase:"The result is Senate Sub for House Bill 2916, a new pay plan based on successful ideas from the private sector. Over the next five years, the new plan will bring more than 7,5000 state employees' wages up to market value and include a 2.5 percent cost of living raise for all state employees."

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gccs14r 5 years, 9 months ago

KU already has trouble retaining good people. Good researchers won't want to come here and the ones already here will probably start shopping around. Kansas is CtD.

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ltownatrain 5 years, 9 months ago

Just to set the record straight for those of you complaining about the cuts from educational areas: that is the only area that they can cut from. I was a sports administration major in college and I can tell you that state schools do not fund athletic departments in fact athletics is actually a private entitiy in charge of raising their own funds from private donors. In fact athletic departments actually pay the school for their athletes to attend school there. Other than this there is no financial connection. So rather than get mad at Lew for doing his job maybe people should get mad at the donors who would rather give money to the athletics department than the school. This is probably falling on deaf ears but I am really just tired of people blasting athletic departments. And just for the record I am from lawrence, and I don't work in the athletic department at KU.

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

KU classified employees voted to become university employees and not state employees. So always is right.This is also why other regents classified employees have voted against becoming university employees at their universities.

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KSA_21_3503 5 years, 9 months ago

Raise tuition and this won't be a problem. Tuition at KU is too low as it is.

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always4ever 5 years, 9 months ago

KU now dictates the raises instead of the state. The lucky ones got half that. The unlucky, much less. Hate to see what's in store for us next year...

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penguin 5 years, 9 months ago

Well it appears that the ugly position that led to the "5 year plan" has reappeared. I think the first thing to remember is that these are just projected cuts from budget years that do not exist yet. It could improve or possibly get worse by the time voting comes around for each of these fiscal year budgets. Two noticeable issues immediately come to mind:Tuition: There is really two ways to increase your tuition revenues: jack up your rates or increase your enrollments. KU and KSU have gone the route of increasing tuition and FHSU for example has exploded their virtual college that has led to an enrollment of 9,000+ (over 50% of which are not on campus). The first roadblock to increasing tuition would be that of "guaranteed tuition". Ideally, KU has promised students that they will have the same tuition for their four year at KU. There are still students on campus not under this agreement, but the program could be scrapped completely. The guarantee is not contractual and they are free to increase tuition. The only other answer is to develop more distance education classes. Enrollment figures show that KU has peaked, but who knows if the studies on major sporting victories and attendance are true there could be more students on campus.University Employees: A few years back when classified employees became university employees I had some concerns. It seemed that the relatively small amount of money could never replace the job security of being a state employee. I believe that this is a way that money can be saved and that extraneous employees in smaller academic units will be targeted. I think that other than maybe jumping tuition (which this sure sounds like the same rhetoric that came out before the last major tuition increases) the pet projects of the admin that are in trouble will be emphasized in fund raising. They can always develop pocket proposals for Endowment to fund these areas that are cut...if they are actually cutting to the bone. However, if they wanted to be truly revolutionary they could focus not only on recruitment of new students, but retention of old students. If KU could keep a larger percentage of their students from freshman year through graduation...imagine the extra dollars they would have available. Unfortunately, this would require faculty to be heavily involved in advising.

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Steve Jacob 5 years, 9 months ago

didn't all state employees just get like a 7 percent raise?

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jprich 5 years, 9 months ago

If Bubarubu had actually read the title, he/she would have seen that the state is asking "universities" (plural) across the state and not just KU to cut certain programs. With that said, how do these cuts hurt KU and its supposed troubled "image an reputation" anymore than other universities across the state? In fact, as a recent KU graduate, I'd like Bubarubu to explain what gave the university its troubled "image an reputation"?

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Bubarubu 5 years, 9 months ago

Phillbert can read (hawk apparently not so much), but it's worth reiterating that this 14.7M at KU alone. At a university which already has trouble with its image an reputation, this sort of serious cutting will not move things along.

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GSWtotheheart 5 years, 9 months ago

Just a reminder that KU and the Athletics Corporation are separate entities. The Athletics Corporation probably won't be laying off employees and I bet the coaches still get their raises and bonuses. KU staff should have seen these cuts coming. State employees got more money for raises than the staff at KU did this year!

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macon47 5 years, 9 months ago

why dont we have a big collection fromfolks that want to donate toeducation?? liberal arts, etc, etcwhere are all the donors?the are out of workwith no money

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 5 years, 9 months ago

"Gov. Kathleen Sebelius announced in June that all state-funded areas would have to tighten their belts as the state's economy continued to slump."Say goodbye to your hopes for being a VP, Kathleen. How can you lead on a national level when you can't even preserve education in Kansas?

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Phillbert 5 years, 9 months ago

hawkperchedatriverfront - The $5 million and $9.5 million cuts have to be just for KU, as there's no way a 7 percent cut for all Regents schools adds up to only $9.5 million.

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bigcat 5 years, 9 months ago

Just a quick reminder that a large chunk of a coach's salary comes from our sponsorship with Adidas, Gatorade, etc. I remember a few years back when I actually went to school they printed everyones salary and the salary that Roy Williams was getting paid was less then 40 other salaries at the college. I seriously doubt there are a lot of people pumped that our Dean is a stud so we will go to school there as opposed to our athletics. Let alone how much the school receives from sales of Jayhawk merchandise due to our sports teams. I was part of athletics and had friends in the higher up positions and the athletic department is very much so self sustaining. So do not start bashing athletics for taking money or coaches getting paid as the downfall of the University when marketing alone for KU is a multi million dollar industry.

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Eddie Muñoz 5 years, 9 months ago

Athletics is pretty much a different business than the University. The Orange Bowl victory doesn't really seem to be relevant to this discussion.

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Mackadoo 5 years, 9 months ago

Maybe now KU can quit replacing all the sidewalks that don't need to be replaced behind Budig and next to Malott?

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hawkperchedatriverfront 5 years, 9 months ago

5 million in cuts among all the regents schools doesn't amount to much per school. Just a bunch of fluff being thrown around to make it look like something is happening when nothing much will happen. And then 9.5 million. So a total of around 14 million divided by how many schools. What are the real dolllar amounts per school?

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nobody1793 5 years, 9 months ago

So I guess all the thermostats will be set to 55 this winter...

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Reality_Check 5 years, 9 months ago

In a recession, more people retrain. So, cutting the budget of education makes no sense at all.

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Green_Trees_Brown_Dirt 5 years, 9 months ago

"Lariviere said he wanted to keep the cuts away from educational areas as much as possible."That's good, since the "educational areas" operate on relative shoe string budgets as it is.

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Chris Ogle 5 years, 9 months ago

Terrapin2:Man.... why did I miss that.... colllege athletics is sooo important....u-no ... heck, who need education/// I is impotent because I call-ect sport cardds. soory agin.

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terrapin2 5 years, 9 months ago

As for the Provost's comments about keeping the cuts away from educational areas, there are many aspects of a University that don't translate directly into pure class-room academics. If any of you who have posted had more info about the kinds of services KU provides for all Kansans, both directly and indirectly, you would probably be singing a very different tune. In the end everyone one of us living in Kansas will benefit some how, some way from our state universities, whether it be medical, social, ecological, or whatever. And as far as making professors teach more classes, if you don't allow professors time to work on research (for the benefit of others and for KU) they won't come to your university to teach in the first place.

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Chris Ogle 5 years, 9 months ago

I bet Mangino will donate part of his salary........ or Perkins will raise basketball seats via WIlliams Fund Donations to exclude everyone but the "Rich--clan" ,,,,, man I am excited... wa-hoo..... go sports.. the heck with education,,,,, let me collect sports cards or something important like that so I can do my fair share.

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classclown 5 years, 9 months ago

"Luckily we have a excellent athletics department. Who needs education when we go to the Orange Bowl?"..."Is anyone went to and graduated from KU have an opinion on this? I think it's terrible that there are cuts to the budget and it having an effect on the universities."======================Case in point.

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Bruce Bertsch 5 years, 9 months ago

Logicman, you are illogical. The state should be funding more and not less of the overall budget. The alternative will be to continually increase tuition or, as has happened in the past, defer maintenance and other needed expenses. That is what put us in a 1/2 billion dollar deferred maintenance hole that the legislature refuses to adequately address.

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Chris Ogle 5 years, 9 months ago

This is bad....don't know what else to say but get ready to buy from anywhere but here.... China, Pakiistan...and all the other "stans". What a deal

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LogicMan 5 years, 9 months ago

In an odd sort of way, the good news is that states' funds are a small part of the overall budget of most state universities.So this news does not mean an overall 7% cut of KU's budget. No more paperclips, though, for the next couple of years.

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black_coffee 5 years, 9 months ago

$9.2 million cut in Fiscal Year 2010??? Starting July 1, 2009?How do you make a cut in a Fiscal Year that has not even been funded by the state and for which no requests have even been made by state offices?Or is KU committing to cut its state funding request by $9.2 million for that year? If so, what prevents the universities from backfilling that budget hole in the tuition increases for FY 2010?

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Quigly 5 years, 9 months ago

Luckily we have a excellent athletics department. Who needs education when we go to the Orange Bowl?

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davidnta 5 years, 9 months ago

Is anyone went to and graduated from KU have an opinion on this? I think it's terrible that there are cuts to the budget and it having an effect on the universities.

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johngalt 5 years, 9 months ago

Maybe ask professors to teach more than 2 classes. There's lots of waste at unversities.

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Orwell 5 years, 9 months ago

"Keep the cuts away from educational areas?" At a UNIVERSITY?!?!? What a concept!

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