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Archive for Sunday, January 6, 2008

Study: Male monkeys ‘pay’ for sex with grooming

January 6, 2008

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Japanese Macaque monkeys groom each other, sitting in a hot spring in the snow at Jigokudani Wild Monkey Park in Yamanouchi, Nagano prefecture, central Japan on Jan. 19, 2004. Male macaque monkeys pay for sex by grooming females, according to a recent study that suggests the primates may treat sex as a commodity.

Japanese Macaque monkeys groom each other, sitting in a hot spring in the snow at Jigokudani Wild Monkey Park in Yamanouchi, Nagano prefecture, central Japan on Jan. 19, 2004. Male macaque monkeys pay for sex by grooming females, according to a recent study that suggests the primates may treat sex as a commodity.

— Male macaque monkeys pay for sex by grooming females, according to a recent study that suggests the primates may treat sex as a commodity.

"In primate societies, grooming is the underlying fabric of it all," Dr. Michael Gumert, a primatologist at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, said in a telephone interview Saturday.

"It's a sign of friendship and family, and it's also something that can be exchanged for sexual services," Gumert said.

Gumert's findings, reported in New Scientist last week, resulted from a 20-month observation of about 50 long-tailed macaques in a reserve in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Gumert found after a male grooms a female, the likelihood that she will engage in sexual activity with the male was about three times more than if the grooming had not occurred.

And as with other commodities, the value of sex is affected by supply and demand factors: A male would spend more time grooming a female if there were fewer females in the vicinity.

"And when the female supply is higher, the male spends less time on grooming ... The mating actually becomes cheaper depending on the market," Gumert said.

Other experts not involved in the study welcomed Gumert's research, saying it was a major effort in systematically studying the interaction of organisms in ways in which an exchange of commodities or services can be observed - a theory known as biological markets.

Dr. Peter Hammerstein, a professor at the Institute for Theoretical Biology at Humboldt University in Berlin and Dr. Ronald Noû, a primatologist at the University of Louis-Pasteur in Strasbourg, France, first proposed the concept of biological markets in 1994.

"It is not a rare phenomenon in nature that males have to make some 'mating effort' in order to get a female's 'permission' to mate," Hammerstein said in an interview, likening the effort to a "fee" that the male pays.

"The interesting result of Dr. Gumert's research on macaque mating is that the mating market seems to have an influence on the amount of this fee," Hammerstein said.

Comments

DirtyLinen 6 years, 3 months ago

So the study shows what human males have always known?

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 3 months ago

Oldest profession in the world... You pay for it one way or another. It's all about negotiating the price.

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akt2 6 years, 3 months ago

Male humans tend to look and act like apes most of time.

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bondmen 6 years, 3 months ago

"And the point is? Animals go through all kinds of courtship rituals, some much more elaborate than this. Why do you suppose the researchers and the news media gave us this story, and used terms suggestive of prostitution? Pure empirical science? Knowledge for knowledge's sake?

A clue might be found in another monkeyshine story on the BBC News: monkeys laugh.  "What is clear now is the building blocks of positive emotional contagion and empathy that refer to rapid involuntary facial mimicry in humans evolved prior to humankind," a researcher said.  How clear is that?  Maybe the monkeys are practicing for American Idol.  Maybe they are telling the other monkey to shut up.

Darwinists are on a campaign to link everything about humans to monkeys, including our emotions, attitudes and sexual behaviors.  They think this will prove common ancestry.  No it won't; creationists already acknowledge that humans have much in common with our creature friends.  We eat bananas, we scratch, we eliminate, we reproduce, some of us even climb trees.  So what?  Birds talk and use tools.  Does that mean we evolved from birds, or they from us?

If monkeys like a good grooming before sex, is that any more remarkable than the courtship ritual of the sage grouse?  If monkeys like to screech and howl and curl their lips, is that any more remarkable than a dog wagging its tail?  The Darwinists are trying to make a point, and we know that all too well."

www.creationsafaris.com/news

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