Archive for Wednesday, October 10, 2007

State school officials push for all-day kindergarten funding

October 10, 2007

Advertisement

— Kansas school officials have recommended increases in public school funding for the next two years to boost teacher salaries and phase-in full-day kindergarten.

The cost would be an additional $26 million in the next school year on top of a $122 million increase already approved by legislators.

The proposal by the State Board of Education will go to the Legislature which starts its session in January.

School advocates have long sought funding for full-day kindergarten, saying that having a longer school day gives students more exposure to math, language arts and other activities.

Statewide, about two-thirds of kindergarten students are enrolled in full-day kindergarten. In Lawrence, eight of the 15 elementary schools offer full-day kindergarten.

Officials have estimated it will take approximately $75 million to establish full-day kindergarten in every school district statewide.

Increasing teacher pay has also been touted by some as a way to attract more people to teaching and retain current teachers. Kansas ranks 38th in average teacher pay at $39,351 per year. The national average is $47,602.

Comments

storm 7 years, 6 months ago

How about all-day school for grades 1 through 12? No late arrival, no early dismissal. Seriously, don't waste money on all-day K, instead use all the $ to boost Teachers' salaries.

Jeanne Cunningham 7 years, 6 months ago

Just use all the money that the state will no longer be paying to daycares for those kids. AND, do NOT make it mandatory. For those who are at home with their kids and WANT to be, let their kids be kids for at least one-half of the days for one more year.

guesswho 7 years, 6 months ago

How about we get rid of things like NCLB so there isn't so much pressure to have kids do well on standardized tests.

Godot 7 years, 6 months ago

Oh, my, yes, lets put the kids in school all day from the time they can first form a thought, and then not hold educators accountable for anything; just wait until they reach the ripe old age of 24 (after spending 6 years to party through undergraduate school) before employers make the horrifying discovery that the kids are illiterate.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.