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Archive for Monday, November 26, 2007

How many Nimrods can one town hold?

November 26, 2007

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It's difficult to resist a series called "Nimrod Nation" (8 p.m., Sundance), the eight-part documentary that airs every Monday night through Dec. 17. The Nimrod is the team name for the high school athletes in Watersmeet, a small hamlet in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Watersmeet residents seem obsessed with high school basketball, and men old enough to be great-grandfathers introduce themselves as Nimrods, class of 1940.

The intimate film takes an unabashed liking to its subject. The residents live far from urban distractions and spend their time hunting, ice fishing, shooting and riding snowmobiles. It's no exaggeration to say that Nimrods live close to nature and in a place where nature thinks nothing of turning the thermostat down to 25 below zero.

The main drama involves the 2005-2006 Nimrod basketball season. Coach Peterson, a third-generation Nimrod, has two sons on the squad. A subplot involves one local resident's efforts to halt a real estate development near a waterfall, a local natural wonder and tourist attraction. When a neighbor accuses him of being a "tree-hugger," he responds with a philosophy more rooted in scripture than the Sierra Club, calling the subdivision "a crucifixion upon the land."

"Nimrod Nation" evokes a small-town atmosphere that many fear lost. In some stretches, it may remind viewers of "Fargo" without the violence and "Friday Night Lights" without the sex. A father takes his boys ice fishing on a vast frozen lake in subzero temperatures and calls it "heaven."

But all is not hunky dory. Fear of drug use and teen pregnancy abound, and while relations between the white residents and the local Native Americans have improved since the Nimrod class of 1940, tension and resentment lingers. One cheerleader confesses that she "hates" the town and wants to move somewhere warmer, "like Wisconsin."

¢ Three repeats of "The Closer" (7 p.m., TNT) air every night through Wednesday.

Comments

gr 6 years, 4 months ago

"Of course, if you want to get right down to it, the religious beliefs of Stalin, etc., were largely incidental to the atrocities they committed."

While I would disagree with some of your gay list, you probably do have a point here. I believe I've heard it said that Hitler thought he was doing God's will. Many people do believe similarly in the atrocities they do. This comes from a simple idea that God makes laws, but He doesn't follow them. For example, he says do not kill, but yet if you don't love Him, He'll kill you. He's above His own laws. Kind of lopsided and much like many humans you know about, isn't it?

By subscribing to such a belief system as that, it is very easy to make the jump that if you imagine you are "blessed" by God, then you should "help" Him out. Then you have wars for wiping out a "degenerate" race, or you have "repent or we'll kill you for Jesus".

I would agree, it would be kind of hard to love a God like that. It's also easy to read things in the Bible about God, then compare how humans work and connive and attribute those same ways and methods to God. Just an indication that one hasn't fully understood and come to know God and the Bible - that His laws are not some arbitrary thing, but a reflection upon His character, who He is.

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Pywacket 6 years, 4 months ago

bearded~ Did you actually read my post? I was not debating the merits of militant religious (or antireligious) belief systems. I was responding to dolly's idiotic comment, "christophobes remind me of homophobes."

What I was getting at is that people who are against religion being shoved down their throats (who had already been labed as "christophobes" by dolly) at least have some understandable reason to distrust those who loudly spout Christianity. (And, again: these offensive "Christians" are in the minority. Most Christians are not offensive and do not wish to overpower everyone else.) I was pointing out various things fanatical Christians have done that gays have NOT done. Where do you get "atheist" from "gay"? And what is your point in trying to twist my comments around to drag in the nazis, Stalin, etc..? Of course, if you want to get right down to it, the religious beliefs of Stalin, etc., were largely incidental to the atrocities they committed. The things I mentioned that were done by Christians were done in the NAME of Christianity--expressly to convert or eliminate those who didn't believe as they did.

Recap: GAYS have not done the things listed above. Thus--homophobes are unjustified in their hatred or distrust. Christians have done many things to cause hatred or distrust in some people (whether you agree with them or not, you can see their reasoning).

Most non-Christians, including me, do NOT hate most Christians (i.e., the term "christophobe" is moronic and false) or think they should "turn away from that lifestyle." We just wish the more militant among them would leave the rest of us alone.

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Dollypawpaw 6 years, 4 months ago

beatrice (Anonymous) says:

Remember folks, Dolly is just right-thinker using a different name. He has already been outed elsewhere. So everything "she" says is coming from his pointed head.

Scottsdale Community College are the Artichokes.

Blessed beatrice the beatrified,

May supreme happyness shadow your progress.

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bearded_gnome 6 years, 4 months ago

and, at university of california, santa cruz, the mascot is "the battling banana slugs!" you walk off campus into the forested mountains and you'll find lots of banana slugs if you wish to commune with them.


py, you are wrong. the scale of death is way tipped in favor of the leadership that was atheistic or unbelieving, i.e. Stalin, Hitler, Cambodia's killing fields, vietnam after we pulled out. just there, I've listed something beyond 18 million souls killed by atheistic or unbelieving leadership, and there's lots more. so, put away the cliche thinking and the antichristian biggotory you've learned from liberal profs.

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igby 6 years, 4 months ago

Pywacket: It's o.k. to use it incorrectly, I was just pointing out that its has in fact mutated into a totally different Icon. My spell check still does not see "nimrods" as proper or accepted spelling.

I was jokingly serious about the icon Nimrod. However, in the film Pulp Fiction, it was used it in the Cafe/diner robbery clip by John T. describing the english couple (robbers) of the diner.

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kneejerkreaction 6 years, 4 months ago

Pywacket (Anonymous) says: Homophobes have no excuse.


Your diatribe about the purity of our homosexual brothers is total conjecture and crap. You have no idea if what you write is true or not.

But, don't let that stop you.

I've never met a homosexual who wasn't messed up in the head for one reason or another. You can postulate all you want, but you're quite full of it. Good night.

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bearded_gnome 6 years, 4 months ago

when used for a foolish or silly person, 'nimrod' is often spelled 'nymrod' for emphasis and to highlight that meaning. wiki didn't include that.


they don't grow artichokes around scotsdale...but then they don't grow nimrods in the michigan up either.

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Pywacket 6 years, 4 months ago

If R_T is a male and has, indeed, taken the name "Dolly" as a new online identity, who am I to argue with "her" self-emasculating efforts? Might as well address Dolly as a "she." Maybe this is R_T's first step toward getting in touch with his/her feminine side. Who knows--he/she may warm up to those decadent gay people yet!

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beatrice 6 years, 4 months ago

Remember folks, Dolly is just right-thinker using a different name. He has already been outed elsewhere. So everything "she" says is coming from his pointed head.

Scottsdale Community College are the Artichokes.

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Pywacket 6 years, 4 months ago

jd~ Did anyone say anything about Islam, Shinto, Buddhism, etc., to give you any indication that they WANT one of those belief systems to shove their views down the throats of the rest of us? No. So your comment has no basis in fact.

If I lived in Sudan, you'd probably call me Islamophobic.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21973378/

I believe this is wrong, stupid, fatheaded, and oppressive. In other words, I find myself feeling very "phobic," if you will, any time one group's religious beliefs are used to oppress or marginalize other people.

Not that Dolly's asinine use of the term "phobic" actually applies... but in playing along, it's easy to point out the idiocy of her (and your) characterization. I, like most non-Christians, do not wish Christianity obliterated--we just wish the militant Christians (who constitute a minority in this country, happily) would mind their own business about what the rest of us believe. Live and let live.

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Pywacket 6 years, 4 months ago

Homophobes have no excuse.

Gay people do not insist that everyone who is not gay will go to hell. Gay people do not conduct missionary trips to third-world nations in order to shove their beliefs down the throats of destitute starving people along with much-needed food and drink. Gay people did not worm gratuitous and self-serving phrases into our Pledge of Allegiance during the paranoid Eisenhower 50s or onto the coinage that we all (gays and non-gays alike) must use. Gay people do not have a long and horrific history of persecuting, slaughtering, and brainwashing non-gay people, or of destroying the rich cultural and religious heritage of every smaller or less well-armed civilization they could steamroll over. Gay people do not treat non-gay people like second-class citizens and smugly assert that "their way" is the ONLY way.

Do you get it yet? No. And you never will.

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jd 6 years, 4 months ago

Interesting that the same people who are christophobic aren't islamophobic.

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Dollypawpaw 6 years, 4 months ago

Christophobes remind me of Homophobes.

"Probably once people stop seeing (plug in your favorite phobe here) everywhere".

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Mr_Ramirez 6 years, 4 months ago

Id say close to 100,000.........

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Pywacket 6 years, 4 months ago

Igby, I do hope you're joking. If not, you're terribly confused.

Language evolves to suit our needs. We needn't be afraid to transgress from whatever rules were in effect 500, 1000, or 2000 years ago. Amazingly, the sky will not fall on our heads if we use modern (even American) English rather than the English of Shakespeare's or Chaucer's times. To suggest that modern-day English should adhere to the rules of Biblical times is absurd.

Modern usage does not detract from a word's roots--its roots will always be a part of its history. But if you're going to insist on adherence to original use and meaning, you'd better not stop with "nimrod." By your standards, most of our language would have to be radically catapulted back in time.

In the words of Bugs Bunny, "Unlax, Doc!" ;-) If the school uses "Nimrod" for the team name, it is only logical and fitting that they pluralize it, as in "the fighting Nimrods" or "Nimrods--class of 1940." To do otherwise would introduce confusion and awkwardness.

Sounds like it will be an amusing and interesting documentary.

Oh, and Dolly-- people will be "cured" of Christophobia when the Christophiliacs learn to keep their obsession to themselves. Not that your question is remotely relevant...

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jonas 6 years, 4 months ago

Probably once people stop seeing Christophobia everywhere.

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Dollypawpaw 6 years, 4 months ago

Is there a cure for Christophobia?

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gr 6 years, 4 months ago

And some confuse the Tau of Nimrod with the Cross of Jesus.

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igby 6 years, 4 months ago

Nimrod is a relative term in the singular, like "all your relatives are nimrods" is false because there is no plural association for the origin of the word. Its an Old Biblical first name in referring to a first person.

The term S**t is an example. Person Place or thing. Neither. A verb in the present tense. A noun in the past tense. You must add something before it or after it to have association to it's proper meaningful use.

"Nimrods" plural does not exist.

If you don't believe me then why does your spell check say its misspelled. S**ts is a condition. Neither person place or thing but a verb. "Nimrods is not a condition.

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