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Archive for Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Pit bull shot after killing miniature horse

March 7, 2007

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A pit bull owner shot his animal last week after it attacked and killed a pregnant miniature horse.

Three other mares were injured in the attack, which occurred Thursday evening about three miles east of Tonganoxie.

According to the Leavenworth County Sheriff's Office, the horse belonged to Kay Moyer.

The dog's owner, Kevin Cook, told sheriff's officers he was working in a garage and his dog, a pit bull terrier, was running free. Cook told officers he had not seen the dog for about 10 minutes. When he looked for the dog, he found him attacking the miniature horses at the home next door. Cook captured the dog and shot it.

Moyer told officers the mare killed by the pit bull was nine months pregnant. The normal gestation period for a miniature horse is 11 months.

Leavenworth County does not have an ordinance prohibiting pit bulls. However, the county does have a vicious animal ordinance.

Comments

50YearResident 7 years, 4 months ago

Pit Bulls are only good for one thing.

Protect illegal activities of the people that own them..

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yankeelady 7 years, 4 months ago

Some friends of mine lost an entire herd of alpacas north of Topeka in October. 4 dogs , pit bull/mastiff types were involved in the attack. The owners knew the dogs were dangerous but insisted they had to be able to run. The result was 8 dead alpacas, including a week old baby and 2 llamas. Not to mention traumatized owners, who still can't stand to go out to the barn or pens. I love dogs, live in the country and have 3. Just dogs, not vicious ones. But I have a fenced yard, and they stay in the fence. Usually it's the dogs that get hurt or killed running loose. I think mandatory fines for owners who let their dogs run, and can't control them, would be a great idea.

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Devon Kissinger 7 years, 4 months ago

"Posted by 50YearResident (anonymous) on March 7, 2007 at 1:24 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Pit Bulls are only good for one thing.

Protect illegal activities of the people that own them.."

I'm a pit bull owner, I challenge you to... no I beg you to prove your allegation. If you don't know of which you speak, keep your yap shut. I'll give you all the information you want to try to prove it. I guarantee you will be wrong in your assertion.

"Posted by from_beautiful_downtown_topeka (anonymous) on March 7, 2007 at 2:15 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I don't know.......sounds like the owner was being extremely irresponsible to me.

But!, what the hell!, right?! Blame the dog!"

Yeah, that makes sense.

About as much sense as those that wish to blame the gun.

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redwaggoner 7 years, 4 months ago

This dog is a good dog now! It's dead! I know there will be a lot of flack over this, but a few more dogs need to bite the dust! I detest dogs, altho I know of a woman in Lawrence that loves 'em primarily because she was deprived of a pet before she left home.

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American_Pit_Bull_Terrier 7 years, 4 months ago

Redwagon, Agnostick, 50 year.....all of you, I bet, have never owned a pit bull terrier.

None of you know what you're talking about.

You're all ignorant.

Pit Bull Terriers, as a breed, are sweet, kind, loving, loyal, affectionate....and incredibly smart!

If mistreated, they (like any other kind/type/breed of dog) can be aggressive (among other things).

This is about the owner.....not the dog and/or the breed.

Why don't the three of you do some research...for once!--Instead of making idiotic statements.

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American_Pit_Bull_Terrier 7 years, 4 months ago

Oh, and one more thing......there's the American Pit Bull Terrier.....and there's the Staffordshire Terrier.

The LJ World and many of you numbskull posters continue to use the generic/ignorant term: "pit bull".

And every time you do....you prove/demonstrate your ignorance.

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leadrain 7 years, 4 months ago

P.S. I'M GALD TO SEE THAT THE OWNER TOOK THE LAW INTO HIS OWN HANDS, OR AT LEAST IRON AND WOOD AND A LITTLE GIFT FROM THE CHINESE. BAAAAAANG!!!! BETTER THAN A CHILD NEXT.

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lefthanded 7 years, 4 months ago

Cats rule. Dogs drool.

Cats rub your leg when they want affection, not when they're horny.

Cats use a litter box. Dogs use your leg.

Cats bury their crap. Dogs dig up others'.

Why do you think they call it "Dog Breath?"

Cats rule!

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yankeelady 7 years, 4 months ago

It's too bad there isn't mandatory dog owner education. It isn't fair to the dogs or the public to have ill trained, out of control animals running around. I agree that it isn't a breed specific problem, or a dog problem. It's a people problem.

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Flap Doodle 7 years, 4 months ago

"WASHINGTON - People who own vicious dogs such as pit bulls have significantly more criminal convictions - including crimes against children - than owners of licensed, gentler dogs such as beagles, researchers reported on Thursday. A study of 355 dog owners in Ohio showed that every owner of a high-risk breed known for aggression had at least one brush with the law, from traffic citations to serious criminal convictions. And 30 percent of people who owned an aggressive breed of dog and who also had been cited at least once for failure to register it had at least five criminal convictions or traffic citations. This compared to 1 percent of owners of low-risk, licensed dogs such as poodles, beagles or collies, the researchers reported in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.' http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15755870/

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pelliott 7 years, 4 months ago

we had a vicous cat we loved. It was called Sue. She was tiny, vicious but unforgiving. We loved her. I hate pit bulls but have watched one play and be charming, later it bit it's owner's car and wouldn't let go, puncturing a radial, still didn't let go, I think they might be more dangerous than other dogs.

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 7 years, 4 months ago

"If you want to keep a vicious animal, you shouldn't be living in a place where other people and their non-vicious pets live."

That advice is lost on those who are in denial about whether a PB is a vicious animal.

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yankeelady 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostick I'm so sorry you went through that. Thank God the baby wasn't in the yard. I hope the owners had the decency to take some responsibility for their animals. If folks want to own that kind of dog they have to secure them--even if they have to use the type of cages the zoos use. And learn how to be a responsible dog owner--some breeds require much more control. And I don't think Scruffy's law applies here. Especially with an illegal, vicious dog in your yard.

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BDitty 7 years, 4 months ago

The following from the AKC: "To provide communities with the most effective dangerous dog control possible, laws must not be breed specific. Instead of holding all dog owners accountable for their behavior, breed specific laws place restrictions only on the owners of certain breeds of dogs. If specific breeds are banned, owners of these breeds intent on using their dogs for malicious purposes, such as dog fighting or criminal activities, will simply change to another breed of dog and continue to jeopardize public safety.

Strongly enforced dog control laws such as leash laws, generic guidelines for dealing with dangerous dogs and increased public education efforts to promote responsible dog ownership are all positive ways to protect communities from dangerous dogs. Increasing public education efforts is significant because it helps address the root cause of the problem --- irresponsible dog owners.

Many communities and cities believe that the solution to prevent severe and fatal dog attacks is to label, restrict or ban certain breeds of dogs as potentially dangerous. If the breed of dog was the primary or sole determining factor in a fatal dog attack, it would necessarily stand to reason that since there are literally millions of Rottweilers, Pit Bulls and German Shepherd Dogs in the United States, there would have to be countless more than an approximate 20 human fatalities per year.

Since only an infinitesimal number of any breed is implicated in a human fatality, it is not only unreasonable to characterize this as a specific breed behavior by which judge an entire population of dogs, it also does little to prevent fatal or severe dog attacks as the real causes and events that contribute to a fatal attack are masked by the issue of breed and not seriously addressed.

And then I found this little tidbit :

The most horrifying example of the lack of breed predictability is the October 2000 death of a 6-week-old baby, which was killed by her family's Pomeranian dog. The average weight of a Pomeranian is about 4 pounds, and they are not thought of as a dangerous breed. Note, however, that they were bred to be watchdogs! The baby's uncle left the infant and the dog on a bed while the uncle prepared her bottle in the kitchen. Upon his return, the dog was mauling the baby, who died shortly afterwards. ("Baby Girl Killed by Family Dog," Los Angeles Times, Monday, October 9, 2000, Home Edition, Metro Section, Page B-5.)

Sign my petition now for the destruction of the vicious beast known as the Pomeranian!!!!!

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GonetotheDogs 7 years, 4 months ago

You people have completely gone insane. Any dog can bite and kill. Some dogs are more able to inflict damage than others. But explain to me how BSL will protect the public? Because, when the poodle down the street jumps out and necessitates stitches for the neighbor lady a week after it bit the kid across the street, after killing the family cat, it will also take the beloved indoor, vaccinated, family pet in your living room happily chewing her favorite stuffed animal, away to be euthanized just because it looks like it could pose a threat. Any living creature with a mouth can bite, and yes, some are more destructive than others, but any animal needs to be managed properly. That falls with the owners and caretakers of that animal. The guy was working in the garage not watching his dog...was he in a fenced yard? Was he being watched? Was the owner being responsible? NO!! The only responsible thing that guy did was to put that dog down. To bad for the horses, their owner, and the dog that the guy didn't try to be responsible any sooner. He should have to pay every cent of the value of those horses, the unborn foal, bills and expenses, and stress for the owner. That being said, I have 4 dogs all of breeds/types that can be associated and endangered with BSL- I also watch them closely- when they are out loose, they are on my fenced property, when they are off my property, they are on a leash, when they are out in their fenced yard, they are kept under supervision. We do not leave them outside while taking a nap or not at home. They are all vaccinated for everything down to Giardia... they are all altered. They are socialized and obedience trained. I do this because I want to be a responsible owner and to protect my dogs. I have had neighbor kids throwing things at my dogs and then run as the dog started getting frustrated- the police were called and took care of the kids. I have had neighbor kids open gates. We called the police and put a lock on the gate. I have had neighbor's dogs running loose (labs and another was a lab spaniel cross, and lab cattle dog crosses) that attacked my horses, and killed goats....each time, my dogs were where they should be and not interfering with anyones way of life. But where were the neighbors when their dogs were going after the other neighborhood kids and animals? But I guess that was OK because the were Labs...

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yankeelady 7 years, 4 months ago

I believe I said that any dog can be a problem--but some are more prone to it, mainly due to their owners. Until there is a way to train people this will happen. And I'm sure the incidence is actually quite low compared to the number of dogs out there. And if you are the one affected that isn't much consolation. Train people.

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50YearResident 7 years, 4 months ago

Colt 45, You are right my statement was a little harsh about pit bull owners so I am amending it in this post. You must be in the 1%.

"99% of Pit Bulls are only good for one thing. Protect illegal activities of the people that own them.."

I have a Grandaughter that has a pit bull which she dearly loves. I have told her more than once to get rid of it but she won't. She says it is a gentle and loving dog. When it turns and injures or kills someone I will be the first to say "I told you so".

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trinity 7 years, 4 months ago

agnostick my heart goes out to you&your family on the loss of your sweet little pet. is the other corgi better, now?

i happen to be very close to someone who owns an american pit bull...i'm very leery of that dog. and no, he is not a druggie, drug maker or taker, felon, thief, whatever. just an ordinary average guy(thanks joe walsh). the dog is a beautiful animal-but i admire him from a distance. i'm scared of him. the dog not the guy.

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50YearResident 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostick, Very good research, Thanks

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

Wow Agnostick, if someone would write news items about the tens of millions of dogs who don't bite or kill, you would be overwhelmed by their sheer weight.

Say something relevant.

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BDitty 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostick, When people argue the fact that one breed of dog should be banned because they attack people, that's one thing. But I find those people who want pit bulls or Rotts or, any other bread of dogs banned for attacking other animals to have nothing but a biased, hateful vendetta. It'a an animal for christ sakes. Should your Corgi be put down if it killed a squirrel or rabbitt or cat or mouse or smaller dog? I'm guessing you'd say "well he's never done that before, he's not agressive" but when the rest of us make those claims you toss it out the window. Most animals don't get along with other animals. Nature of the beast you could say.

And one question. It seems to me, you think getting rid of these "vicious dogs" will get rid of the criminal element that chooses them for the haneous activities they make them participate in. True?

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BDitty 7 years, 4 months ago

One more thing, your linked article about the "study" in Ohio proves absolutely nothing. 335 people is not a large enough sample to make these conclusions especially when you consider how many animals are out there. So it seems for you it's guilt by association. Because bad people choose these dogs, the dogs must be bad.

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leadrain 7 years, 4 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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sourpuss 7 years, 4 months ago

I don't believe that any given breed is inherently "bad" or "good," but there are breeds that are harder to handle and train than others. As well, breeds do have tendancies toward having certain dispositions... that is why we have different breeds. Shepherds perform a different duty than terriers.

I don't happen to like any terriers, "pit bull" or no. I think they are high-strung, unpredictable, and too physical, from the itty to the huge. Why? They were bred to chase things and kill them. Can they be sweet and loving? Sure, but they were still bred to chase things and kill them.

I also happen to think all of those large terriers (and most small ones too) are fairly ugly, but that is an aesthetic judgment. I would also very quickly shoot any large terrier who enters my property. I don't trust them, I never will, and if you love your dog, keep them at home and on a leash or in a pen.

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partdim 7 years, 4 months ago

Forgive my ignorance, but what is BSL?

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fairylight 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostick (anonymous) on March 7, 2007 at 10:52 p.m. (Suggest removal)

. Go out to the sticks if you want to keep company with these killers. Maybe we'll be lucky and read about you in the papers when one of 'em reverts to their "wild ways"

Ag old friend. Please do NOT send anymore of them my way, out to the sticks.

We have plenty. Sadly, not a week goes by that we don't see newly dumped animals around the lake. I don't know what people are thinking!

We have both walk trails and horse trails on the back of our property line, Last month two hikers were almost attacked by stray, dumped dogs. One was a pit mix by all accounts. The the first of this week a girl riding a horse had a pit mix jump and attack her leg. Luckly it just got the boot and nothing else.

BLS is not the answer,. THere are place in KC it is unsafe to walk out to your car due to un managed pitbull and other dogs. Now , when people dump these animals, the problems increase 10 fold.

How grows the baby? Well I hope.

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GonetotheDogs 7 years, 4 months ago

Talk about inflammitory comments...A horse that was probably no more than 36" at the shoulder- an adult or two can pick one up.....maybe a couple hundred pounds while pregnant. The point is, that dog should have been directly supervised, and it wasn't, which is the case with the VAST MAJORITY of ANY dog attack. It falls to the fools that decide they want to get a dog(for one reason or another), then aren't responsible enough to care for it properly! How many of the bull-bred dogs that are involved in these incidents are responsibly bred, handled, and cared for???? Just saying the sweet dog chained in the backyard wouldn't hurt a fly doesn't mean squat. Has it been obedience trained, has the maintence been done on the training to ensure that the dog is consistent in its responses? Has it been socialized? Has it been out and around and exposed to life like many other dogs? Has it been exercised- not just goofing around for a few minutes a day or two a week, but actually EXERCISED? Does the owner of the dog know how/why/for what purpose that dog ( for any breed or combination of breeds) was created and used? Do they know how that dog should be handled, fed, etc.... Many of these people don't have a clue. There is where the problem lies. Terriers were bred to hunt and kill (vermin) on their own, spaniels and retrievers were bred to hunt with a hunter, collies and shepherds were bred to work cattle from behind for the farmers and ranchers, bull dogs were bred to control livestock from the front so that farmers and ranchers could care for their livestock, mastiffs were used as guards and wardogs no endurance for the most part, but the size and look alone was enough to do the trick...when you combine two or more types of dogs, recently in the family tree or not, unless you've selectively bred out traits, you have essentially combined all of those purposes in one dog. That is where you run into trouble. Then it magnifies greatly when you get some idiot thinking that they can pay the bills by having a couple litters, and the next round of fools give or take a few of them being good hearted and somewhat knowledgable giving them good homes, but not following through in the care it actually takes, and voila! Instant need for Animal Control, and a virtually nonstop source of entertainment for the media! Does anybody remember in a past decade before the 'bulls' were such an issue here, the huge outbreak of biting border collie mixes living in town because they were cute cuddly and free? Somehow people forgot that they were not bred for a city life unless you ran 10 miles every morning, and played frisbee for an hour each night!

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Devon Kissinger 7 years, 4 months ago

Not that you really care but when I was 10 or 11 a German Shepherd took a large chunk out of the back of my right leg. I dont wish for them to be legislated out of existence. I've also been bitten by a Brittany, an English Setter (both farm dogs), and a Daucshund mix (family pet). I've never been bitten by a Pit bull or any of the other breeds that are often mistakenly called pit bulls. You'll notice there isn't a lot written about those kinds of dogs, mainly because the MSM hasn't given them the drama and coverage they've given the terriers.

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American_Pit_Bull_Terrier 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostick, you're a jerk.

You think you know what you're talking about.....but you don't.

I'm not going to argue with you, you clueless fool.

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American_Pit_Bull_Terrier 7 years, 4 months ago

But I will say this one more time.......As a breed, Bull Terriers are sweet, kind, loving, affectionate....and smart!

....Agnostick.....stick to what you think you know best......you know, like "all-things-pertaining to homosexuals/homosexuality", or whatever.

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Flap Doodle 7 years, 4 months ago

Still plugging your own form, Marion? Trying to break that 5 unique visitors a month record?

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whistlestop75 7 years, 4 months ago

Let me tell you a true story of a 4 year old attacked by a husky in 1984...he survived...His parents will never forget the 3 day wait to see if his eye survived...or the weeks wait to see if his sewn on ear would work. The horror of his stitched face and the time praying to God to save him while he was in surgery. All this because he walked by a husky that was on a double chain. The reason the dog attacked?...no one knows or will ever know. The thought was because our son was small and the dog was protecting his dog bone. Were we there with our son? Sure thing. We were in our yard...the dog was next door...and on a new double chain. It happened in the blink of an eye...The dog was legal because he was on a chain...the police could do nothing and the family decided that the dog didn't mean to do it. The dog was never destroyed and the family never apologized...that was a case of the family pet coming before a human being and in 1984, it was considered a fluke. We live in a small town...they ended up moving...I am glad newspapers now report these tradgedies...at least people are aware that it does happen...we had never known anyone to be attacked before our son...

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

I was walking my dogs this evening and I passed by a park full of playing kids. I heard one child yelling, Doggies!" then another say, several times "Those are pit bulls."

They are CLEARLY not pit bulls but they're big dogs. I sneaked a peek over my shoulder and the child speaking was in the 11-13 range I would guess. Where do you reckon this child got this information? Maybe I'm wrong but shouldn't a child this age know the difference between a pit bull and a shepherd or a pit bull and a rottweiler/lab mix?

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

Agnostik, your ignorance of dogs is legendary therefore you have no valid opinion on this subject. Kindly STFU.

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

Touchy! Hardly, you've expressed, more than once, your desire to kill my dogs or for the government to outlaw them. You've never seen my dogs sleeping with my cats or playing with kids and playing the part of "the monster" whilst the kids chase them with their toy light sabres. You make assumptions based on your beliefs about something you don't understand. And my name isn't Briana; it's not Brian either so it looks like you've hit another dead end. Get used to it.

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sourpuss 7 years, 4 months ago

Any dog can be dangerous if not owned properly, but let's face it, the chances of being brought to your death by a Pomeranian are pretty slim.

BSL should not be required. I would rather people have to have a license to own animals, especially in an urban or suburban environment (though clearly the country isn't "safe" either by this case). However, enforcing such a regulation would be impossible. A reasonable alternative is to restrict large breed ownership without a license, but again, enforcement is still an issue, though not as large of one. It is hard to hide a large dog, so checking up would be easier, but again again, do we want to devote law enforcement to that? BSL ends up being a compromise between people's desires to have larger pets, the expense and efficacy of law enforcement, and the safety of the community.

Perhaps there are other compromises, but BSL has become popular, and no urban legislation is going to make any breed extinct as long as people are devoted to it. Perhaps a smaller "fan base" would promote better temperment breeding anyway...

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

I was responding to your first sentence, ct.

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sourpuss 7 years, 4 months ago

I understand that enforcing animal issues is not the job of the main police department, but if we needed to, as a community, check on everyone who had a larger pet, we would need more staff, and that is the cost involved. It seems I wasn't very clear, but I think the BSL is a -reasonable- alternative to other options, even if it isn't a perfect solution and doesn't really address the -actual- problem (bad owners/ignorant owners).

Of course, it is illegal to have tigers as pets and yet someone managed to get one into a NYC apartment, so obviously, enforcement will always be an issue.

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person184 7 years, 4 months ago

BrianR..you're creepin' me out.

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Devon Kissinger 7 years, 4 months ago

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BrianR 7 years, 4 months ago

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