Letters to the Editor

Adoption needs

June 20, 2007

Advertisement

To the editor:

Having read the article in Sunday's paper about the couple who adopted the triplets from Ethiopia I found myself with mixed feelings. I'm sincerely glad these children will have opportunities otherwise never dreamed and know their parents are thankful for their new family. I think about the vast numbers of children who have been adopted from overseas (discounting the celebrity fad), and while happy for the prospects of these children's futures I think about the thousands of wonderful children of many ethnic and racial heritages in this country who anxiously await adoption every day.

Some would say they are languishing in a state system. If that statement rings true, then are they not equally as sympathetic as children languishing in other poor countries? It is common knowledge that our state systems are woefully underfunded, understaffed and not ideal parents. Most children will age out of the system without the same opportunities as foreign-born adoptees despite their citizenship. What about their prospects? Do they not deserve loving parents? If it's a shortage of infants in the United States, then we're looking at a shortage of vision by prospective parents.

Private adoptions abound in this country though mostly for white infants with parents who wouldn't want a Third World or "system" baby anyway. Pro-life proponents hail adoption as an alternative. If foreign adoptions continue at what seems an increasing rate, then we need to investigate a system (ours) that doesn't present its children as adoptable. All children need love.

Catherine Bolton,

Lawrence

Comments

Ragingbear 10 years, 4 months ago

No Starvin Marvin, that's a bad Starvin Marvin!

gvermooten 10 years, 4 months ago

Unfortunately, our systems tend to make adoption so difficult and expensive that it's often faster and easier to adopt from a foreign country. No easy answer, I'm afraid.

trinity 10 years, 4 months ago

you nailed it gvermooten. i have several friends, professional types no less!-who were so turned off by the sheer idiocy of the powers that be who come to inspect homes&interview prospective parents, AFTER they'd completed the mandatory 11 or 12 week whatever it is now mapp training, they simply threw up their hands&chose to not go forward with the STATE adoption process. so very sad.

formerksteacher 10 years, 4 months ago

Never mind that domestic adoption costs 20-40 K!! Plus the agencies turn it into a total advertisement about you and how wonderful you are - how you [supposedly] go to church services every weekend and have totally loving extended families close by and enjoying fishing and soccer practice... a digusting wannea-be parent competition!

craigers 10 years, 4 months ago

formerksteacher, That is the only thing that makes me question adoption in this country. Why is it that expensive to adopt children? If we want them out of the system, then adoption needs to be a less expensive process. I understand checking out homes and doing background checks on people to make sure they are prepared to be parents. This is a must but I don't see why it needs to be so expensive.

shockchalk 10 years, 4 months ago

formerksteacher....I agree with you that adoption is far too expensive and there are plenty of other obstacles as well. However, the advertisement is for the benefit of the biological mother. The agencies want to give them choices when they are trying to pick a couple to raise their child. They present several families and try to honestly tell the mother something about them so she can make an informed choice. There are good agencies and bad agencies so it's important to do some research before you pick one.

One of the saddest facts about adoption that I have witnessed is the difference in cost for adopting an african-american baby versus a caucasion, asian, or hispanic baby. What is the message that the agencies are sending? They counter that there are fewer caucasian babies to adopt but that doesn't make it okay does it?

Last but not least, there is a study out that says 72% of couples think about adopting but only a little over 2% actually follow through with it. Many give up because of the difficulties they encounter early on in the process.

Tammy Copp-Barta 10 years, 4 months ago

We have a beautiful child adopted from the state and had no problems whatsoever. We completed the MAPP training and was told that what we were looking for may never come to pass. 4 months later, we found our child. She has some fine and gross motor issues, as well as memory problems we work on, but you get no guarantees with children that are biologically yours. We can't imagine life without her!

As for the cost. There really was none. Once we were selected as the family, we traveled back and forth for visits for a couple of months, this was all reimbursed. The attorney costs were also reimbursed by the state. She has a medical card until she is 21 and gets a monthly subsidy for some additional therapy.

There are many loving, needing kids here if people would just take a look. Give our own kids a chance. It's not as hard as you think and I can't imagine the cost of going overseas and all the red tape involved would be worth it.

If you're interested in adopting, check out https://www.kcsl.org/ or give them a call .. the number is on the website.

KU_cynic 10 years, 4 months ago

I believe that there are at least three reasons why foreign adoptions have become popular:

  1. Less stigma about mixed-race families, so more whites are willing to adopt Asian, African, and Latino children (isn't that a good thing?).

  2. Potentially healthier children with greater potential. The old idea of a nice (white) college girl who has an unwanted child and places it up for adoption just doesn't happen anymore; there are fewer such pregnancies and more abortions. Instead, more US children up for adoption come from mothers with distressed backgrounds (alcoholism, drug abuse, poor nutrition, physical and mental health issues, etc. -- and yes, many of these factors are correlated with race). So, adoptive parents of US children tend to get a "bad draw" from the distribution of child health. Many parents are open to a child with known or likely special needs, but others are not. In contrast, children adopted from abroad are more likely to be a more random draw from the parent population in terms of health and intellectual potential (because many poorer societies have not become as stratified in terms of the relation between human potential and wealth as has ours).

  3. Parental rights have become too strong in the US. Adopting an orphan child from abroad can be a costly and lengthy proposition, but when the adoption is in process or complete there are few strings. In contrast, adoptive parents of US children live in fear that at the 11th hour or after the birth parents or their family -- regardless of their suitability for child-rearing -- will re-emerge and take the child away. It is possible for adoptive parents to accomodate the needs and desires of a known biological parent or family, but most adoptive parents don't want that hassle.

Tammy Copp-Barta 10 years, 4 months ago

I think there are two conversations going on here:

 1) state children for adoption
 2) private adoption

Again .. state children are not as hard to adopt as many believe. Having been through the process I know I had believed it would be hard, cost more and there would be issues. It did not turn out that way. These children have rights of the biological parents severed so they can't come back or change their mind.

Private adoption, on the other hand, can be expensive and you will have the worry of last minute mind changes. Chances of getting a baby are greater, of course, as most (not all) state children are older and are usually sibling sets that must be adopted together.

Crispian Paul 10 years, 4 months ago

OK, there are some HUGE misconceptions here......I used to train and license foster and adoptive homes.

ANY adoptive parent that adopts publicly or privately (private adoptions are almost always newborns or infants) must have the home study process completed (the inspections and "interviews" noted above). Any responsible agency cannot reasonably expect that seeing a person in an office setting for 3 hours per week for 10 weeks (the "11 or 12 week whatever") for PS-MAPP training will give them the information needed to approve a family. The inspection of the actual home is REQUIRED by Kansas Department of Health and Environment for ALL foster, adoptive homes and daycares. This is also required in private adoptions.

If a person is not willing to put in 30 hours of training and complete a process required of all adoptive parents who adopt in the US, public or private, then that is concerning. We are talking about kids with ALL KINDS of special needs, behavioral issues, etc that require more knowledge of how to be effective with these kinds of kids.

I don't think you guys have all the information about this, because there is a lot of anecdotal stuff here that is just not true or is made to seem as if it is exceptional when in fact it is a requirement. In addition, my experience has been people are turned off by US adoptions, particularly public, because most of these kids are over 6 years old ("I only want babies" is the syndrome here), have some type of special need and may be a minority. I think that people adopt more from foreign countries because they are more likely to get a baby, have less restrictions because a home study is not often required and are unwilling to adopt the population of kids available for adoption in the public system.

I see info about the costs associated with public adoptions. It is generally no or very low cost. Because you are adopting from the state, usually the attorney fees are covered. In addition, kids who are adopted out of the state system can get additional money for college, recieve a medical card in order to take that potential financial burden off the adoptive parents and also are automatically submitted for a $100-$500 monthly stipend to help provide for their care. This is to encourage foster homes and adoptive homes who might not otherwise be able to afford to adopt a child to go through with adoption if it is the right decision.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

I adopted a teenaged boy from the foster care system 3 years ago. My sister adopted a six-year-old boy from a Russian orphanage 8 years ago. The two boys are one year apart in age. Their current educational, behavioral, mental health, and social issues are nearly identical. Both have problems which make parenting them more challenging than the average teen.

My sister and her husband paid $30,000, and the adoption agency was out of the picture as soon as the child got here. She has very little information about her son's early life. He had to learn a new language and a new culture. He has no contact with people from his former life who might have smoothed the transition, provided continuity, or advice/assistance when problems arose.

I paid NOTHING for the adoption. The MAPP class, home study, adoption fees, etc. were paid for by the state. (BTW, you'll need those things for a private or international adoption too.) I have very detailed information about my son's family history and his time in foster care. I receive a monthly subsidy to help defray the costs of meeting my son's special needs. He also has a medical card which pays for medical bills which my health insurance doesn't cover.

My son still has contact with his biological sisters who were adopted by another Kansas family at about the same time that he was. He can still talk to his foster families.

For me the adoption process was challenging. Certain people in the system made things more difficult than they had to be. Other people in the system, however, were excellent and helped smooth the way.

There are a lot of Kansas kids waiting for homes. I hope anyone considering adopting will explore the idea of adopting through the Kansas foster care system. It's been a challenge for me - hands down the hardest thing I've ever done - but I love and cherish my son and am grateful to have him in my life. If you're a strong, flexible person or couple, you could make the difference in a child's life.

Confrontation 10 years, 4 months ago

There shouldn't be any children left without families in the U.S. Why aren't all the pro-lifers stepping up and opening their homes to these kids? They are the ones who guilted the moms into having these kids, and now they don't want to step up and support them. Big surprise there.

craigers 10 years, 4 months ago

Thanks Costello, when we can do it my wife and I will look into that. We were planning on adopting somebody that wasn't a baby, so that process doesn't sound too bad. Hopefully we can get a lot of the good people you were speaking of.

Ragingbear 10 years, 4 months ago

You could always try to adopt a kid older than 1 year. Most that are over a few olds will spend their entire childhood in the foster care system because people want an innocent little baby that was custom selected to look just the way they wanted. They don't want a 6 year old that was found abandoned in a tenement, or a 9 year old that witnessed his or her parent's murder. Nobody wants to actually help the children, they only want a child for themselves. Who the kid is is not important to them.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

trinity says: "i have several friends, professional types no less!-who were so turned off by the sheer idiocy of the powers that be ... "

Interestingly, studies have shown that less educated, lower-income families tend to be more successful with adoption:

"In a study of 302 adoptive families of special needs children, more children in the home, participation in religious activities, and less-educated fathers were associated with higher adoptive family functioning. Minority families who adopted minority children also had higher family functioning.

"The income of adoptive parents has been found to be negatively associated with intact adoptions. Thus, the lower the income, the more intact the adoption."

http://www.rom.ku.edu/EBP_adop.asp#

Also note this: "Single parents have better than average success rates with children who are nine or older when adopted."

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

craigers says: "Thanks Costello, when we can do it my wife and I will look into that. We were planning on adopting somebody that wasn't a baby, so that process doesn't sound too bad. Hopefully we can get a lot of the good people you were speaking of."

Good for you! In the meantime, I would advise reading whatever you can get your hands on about adoption and talking to lots of foster and adoptive parents.

Confrontation 10 years, 4 months ago

I've noticed that the KCSL site has pics of children who are up for adoption. It's tough to look at all these kids who are without real families. It's also sad to think about the continued trauma that some of them face by being tossed around to different foster homes.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

Here's a video from a KCSL event, Klicks for Kids in Pittsburg.

http://www.markacrossamerica.org/blog/june-8th-2007-kansas-childrens-service-league/

The song is a bit of a tear jerker.

craigers 10 years, 4 months ago

We have friends that are a part of the system, so you can believe we will be talking a lot to them about this. Thanks for the info.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

KVC also has a photolisting: http://adoption.kvc.org/ I think most or all of the kids at the KVC site are also on the KCSL site.

Adopt US Kids also has photolistings: http://www.adoptuskids.org/ It's nationwide but searches can be limited by state.

trinity 10 years, 4 months ago

crispian, i too have been right in the thick of the "system" for a lot of years now. and the friends i speak of that went through mapp&such in anticipation of adopting were fine with the process until the home visit portion of the ordeal; let me tell you how it went down. the first couple, very very wonderful people, were living in a rented house out in the country. beautiful place, huge yard. well, the folks that own the house also had the surrounding crop and pasture ground. out come (from jo co)a couple of little social worky gals, early 20's, very very little experience in social work let alone life let alone RURAL life. they nearly went apoplectic over the FARM POND(which incidentally was well over 200 yards from the house!); wanted to test water samples etc-THIS WAS A CATTLE POND fer cryin' out loud! the hopeful couple TRIED to explain that to them-but they weren't having it, insisted on testing water samples etc. then, the two bobsy twins did not think that the MACHINERY(which again was at least 100 yds from the house/yard!)was safe for children; sigh, like yeah, my friends were all about letting a toddler or child run rampant with no supervision. there were other pecking points but i won't go in to them this post is long enough now. practicality and rational realistic thought and practice does not come in the envelope with the social work license. some of 'em really are a disservice to an otherwise wonderful profession.

Tammy Copp-Barta 10 years, 4 months ago

The child we adopted was 3 1/2 and is from Kansas. Again, she does have special needs, but with the therapy and a great para at school she is doing wonderful!! She has started asking questions about her birth family off and on and we address that as it comes up depending on her age. We have remained in contact with the foster mom and she's like her "grandma". She will have the answers to questions about her birth parents we may not have some day as she worked with them before termination of rights.

I thank God every day for this child .. I wish all of you the best that are considering adopting a child. They truly are a gift .. FYI my mom and brother-in-law are both adopted as well. Many of our friends have also adopted so our child has a strong support group as she grows up and begins her quest to find her biological family, should she choose.

Tammy Copp-Barta 10 years, 4 months ago

Another note .. the social worker we worked with in Lawrence was great .. although she did discourage us to put in for our daughter. The worker on the other end was HORRIBLE. In the end, we complained to the State about the worker on the other end and contacted lots of people about her procedures and the issues she caused. She no longer is a social worker in Kansas. She did do a disservice to the system and thank goodness is no longer there to be a hinderance. Once we were selected for our daughter, our social worker was wonderful.

Baille 10 years, 4 months ago

State adoptions do NOT cost a lot of money. They just do not. Private domestic adoptions can cost a lot of money.

The state requires that foster/adoptive parents take classes that are meant to educate them about parenting kids who have been abused/neglected. Contrary to popular opinion, love does not conquer all and these kids have very specific challenges. Parents of these kids must develop the skills and knowledge-base in order to be effective parents. MAPP leaders, like everything else, vary. Some are good. Some aren't. For kids who have a history of sexual abuse or who have great difficulty (beyond what is normal and expected) with forming attachments advanced classes are offered. This can make the difference between a life-long parent-child bond and one more failed placement for a kid who does not need another adult to abandon them.

The home visits are a bit different and I know that everyone has some crazy story about the last KDHE worker who came out to inspect their home. Inspectors can't change regulations and there are a lot of regulations. Some foster kids drowns in a lagoon or gets electrocuted by bad wiring in an old barn out back and the state will get sued nad it will lose- rightfully so in most. We are taking these kids from their rightful parents to keep them safe and so the bar is a bit higher. Keep this in mind: it is the state that has custody of those kids - not the foster parents. It is the state that has the responsibility to place them in safe homes. With hundreds of foster homes out there and hundreds and hundreds more needed - indiviudal regulations can't be developed for each home. One size may not fit all, but in most cases it needs to be close enough.

Adopting kids out of state custody takes time. It takes time to train and learn all that one needs to know. It takes time to transition kids into a new home. It takes time to make sure that the potential foster house meets the many, many regulations put in place by KDHE. But these adoptions do not take thousands of dollars. They just take time and commitment. If people are really interested, contact KVC or The Farm or KCSL and ask. There are also many foster parent organizations that can tell you the good and the bad of teh way the system works. I certainly recognize that the system has many failings - but the kids that need parents don't really care about the system. They care about having a home and people who will care about them.

Crispian Paul 10 years, 4 months ago

trinity (Anonymous) says:

crispian, i too have been right in the thick of the "system" for a lot of years now. and the friends i speak of that went through mapp&such in anticipation of adopting were fine with the process until the home visit portion of the ordeal; let me tell you how it went down. the first couple, very very wonderful people, were living in a rented house out in the country. beautiful place, huge yard. well, the folks that own the house also had the surrounding crop and pasture ground. out come (from jo co)a couple of little social worky gals, early 20's, very very little experience in social work let alone life let alone RURAL life. they nearly went apoplectic over the farm pond(which incidentally was well over 200 yards from the house!); wanted to test water samples etc-this was a cattle pond fer cryin' out loud! the hopeful couple TRIED to explain that to them-but they weren't having it, insisted on testing water samples etc. then, the two bobsy twins did not think that the machinery(which again was at least 100 yds from the house/yard!)was safe for children; sigh, like yeah, my friends were all about letting a toddler or child run rampant with no supervision. there were other pecking points but i won't go in to them this post is long enough now. practicality and rational realistic thought and practice does not come in the envelope with the social work license. some of 'em really are a disservice to an otherwise wonderful profession.

I understand that this seems silly, but again, this is required of EVERY SINGLE foster home in the state. I know, I used to do this process. There is no exceptions made for the type of body of water. If is more than a certain depth (12 inches) it needs to be gated, regardless of where it is, what it is or how far from the house it is.

Crispian Paul 10 years, 4 months ago

Trinity, also, I wouldn't blame this on the social workers. This is a Kansas Dept of Health and Environment requirement. When a social worker from a licensing agency goes and does the walk through (which is what you are talking about), they are utilizing the KDHE walk through guidelines. Then KDHE still comes out and does their own walk through. There is not a way to make exceptions for this type of situation. In fact, if a social worker from a licensing agency approves a walk through then KDHE goes out and says that something was done incorrectly or not noted and resolved, this actually DELAYS the licensing process for these families.

Crispian Paul 10 years, 4 months ago

Baille, another issue that gets a lot of people angry at the licensing workers when it is a KDHE requirement: You are not allowed to own a trampoline if you are a foster or adoptive parent. KDHE expressly forbids this and sends out press releases to illustrate the dangers of trampolines. Also, kids under 8 cannot sleep in the top bunk of a bunk bed. Again, KDHE says so. There just really are no ways to make exceptions for what are the basic requirements of KDHE.

trinity 10 years, 4 months ago

you've confirmed my point quite nicely crispian. a kid gets pulled from an ugly abusive/neglectful situation, and there may happen to be a wonderful couple who have dreamed of their own child, fully adopted, lock stock&barrel; so we're going to quibble over a pond that cattle use and assume that these fine folks are going to allow a child to frolic unsupervised around farm machinery. m'kay.

by the way-i've got years in the system myself, and worked rural areas; and have done so many home studies, evaluations, etc that i can't count 'em all. i hardly think i'm being unfair or mean to and about social workers; only certain individual ones who make really uninformed and narrow sighted judgment calls simply because it hasn't been in their realm of experience to live in the country or experience anything other than a by-the-book style of life. and i could go on&on about how kdhe rules&regs hamper and even prohibit children from being placed in ADOPTIVE homes. and some foster homes that should be forever barred from having licenses! somehow though i think that i'm at polar opposite ends of the social work spectrum when it comes to this. i fall on the side of giving a child a forever home instead of dragging their scanty belongings from foster home to group home to foster home ad nauseum in a trash bag.

Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 10 years, 4 months ago

The vast majority of people looking to adopt want to adopt from that young, healthy girl who made a mistake in the back seat of her boyfriend's car, and doen't believe in abortion. They don't want mixed race or older children. They don't want a baby who has health or mental problems. They don't want babies born to a drug or alcohol addicted mother. They don't want the children who were abused. So, to get that perfect, white baby with a high IQ and cute dimples, they have to pay more to private adoption groups. The state has a surplus of children who need loving homes, and they will help you with the support you need to raise the child. It's a challenge, but rewarding.

denak 10 years, 4 months ago

Some of these messages are disheartening. I have been a foster parent for over 3 years and on May 2, I was selected to adopt a 12 year old boy.

In my personal opinion, KDHE does not put so many restrictions on foster families that it is a burden. The only thing KDHE told me I couldn't do is allow my foster children to play in the basement because the windows were too small. So they don't play down there. They go outside. Not a huge issue. Also, I don't think the information regarding trampolines is accurate. I think you can have a trampoline as long as it has sides. The same as with pools.
Having been a foster parent, I can understand some of their requirements a lot more now then when I started. When I went through MAPP, we had a couple come in, take one look at the paperwork and leave. The paperwork isn't horrible. The way I look at it is that I've been through labor and I've been through foster care/adoption paperwork and trust me, adoption/foster care paperwork is A LOT easier! I think people who adopt from the system aren't looking for "perfect kids." Personally, I think perfect kids are boring. I prefer my foster kids. They are resiliant, brave, opinionated, strong, and just outright amazing. There is never a boring day with any of my foster kids. And trust me, sometimes, I wish there were some boring days.

When I read my adoptive son's file, I read everything. Unlike foreign adoption where a lot of the background information was missing, I read everything about his past medical history, his biographical history, his school history,his abuse history and his foster care history. As a result, I think I know more about this child then I would if I tried to adopt from a foreign country.

I applaud anyone who adopts but I applaud more for those who adopt from the "system." Adopting a foster child isn't always easy but it is well worth the experience.

Dena

Jennifer Phythyon 10 years, 4 months ago

My husband and I adopted a child from the state 2 years ago. We decided that we would raise and love a child that was already here on this earth rather than create a new one.

I would question the motivation of a person who complains about certification classes and paperwork when they are trying to become a parent. Paperwork is involved in any child, natural or adopted. I also believe that if everyone had to take a parenting class before becoming parents there might be less unloved, uncared for children in this world.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

About KDHE inspections and licensing: I'd like people to be aware that the KDHE regulations apply ONLY to foster homes.

I'm not licensed as a foster home, and KDHE has never been to my house or inspected it. My house would not meet the requirements to be a foster home because the ceiling in my bedroom slopes - it isn't high enough. Nevertheless, I was able to adopt from the state.

There is some misinformation out there, even among the workers at the agencies. I took MAPP from KVC which at that time (2004) was only doing foster homes, not adoptive homes. [In retrospect I should have gone to KCSL.] I was told at one of the early classes that I would not be able to adopt because my home didn't meet the KDHE standards. I quit the class and almost gave up on adoption.

Then I decided to go ahead and finish MAPP and appeal the KDHE decision if necessary. I intended to make the legislature aware that good families were being declined for adoption because of silly regs. As it turned out, my second MAPP class was taught by a fabulous worker who had just been hired by KVC from KCSL. He had a lot of adoption experience and told me that adoptive homes didn't need to meet the regs. (When he learned that I was interested in adopting a teenaged boy, any race, most behavior problems ok, this worker sat down with me and spent hours explaining the adoption process and how to negotiate it successfully. There ARE good, caring, and knowledgable workers out there.)

The moral of this story is: don't accept the first answer you get. Keep talking to people, keep asking questions, persist. If you're not a persistent person, you may not be the right person to adopt a special needs child. They're a lot of work. And no one's going to roll out the red carpet and tell you how to get the services you'll need. You're going to have to go out there, find the services, and fight for them. If you can't handle the foster care system, you'll probably also have trouble with the schools and IEP's, the mental health system, etc., etc., etc.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

Baille says: "For kids who have a history of sexual abuse or who have great difficulty (beyond what is normal and expected) with forming attachments advanced classes are offered."

That's interesting. I hadn't heard of these classes. Are you talking about additional MAPP? Or something else?

My son came to me with a dx of ADHD, but it turned out he had far more serious dx's - including RAD. It was my experience that RAD isn't really well understood, even by the workers. I'd love to learn more about these classes - for myself and for other adoptive families I'm in contact with.

Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 10 years, 4 months ago

costello, Is your family being treated by Bert Nash? Your counselor should be able to find help for you. I know there are support groups. It's been awhile, and there have probably been budget cuts, but they were really supportive for us. Also contact the University. Social services should be able to give you some numbers of who to contact. I no longer have the numbers, but there are people out there to help. Our son is 17 (and just graduated, woo hoo), and is past the big problems. Bert Nash, WRAP, and SRS were big helps. Sometimes we felt like giving up, but they helped us through. Oh, and we was involved in the JAMS program too. They are great people. Don't try to do it on your own. There are people willing to help. Good luck.

costello 10 years, 4 months ago

Thanks, Dorothy. We get lots of help and have lots of support. ;-) We have case management and med management through Bert Nash, but we have private therapists. We had therapy through Bert Nash but were told that they really didn't have anyone on staff who could deal with his issues.

Unfortunately the Medicaid changes on July 1 will probably change the private mental health providers available to Medicaid patients. My son's Ph.D. psychologist has indicated she'll probably not sign up for Medicaid through the new management care company. On the other hand, a lot of private social workers who can't take Medicaid now may sign up. And in my experience, they seemed to be the ones doing the RAD therapy anyway. Thank God my son has greatly improved and no longer meets the criteria for the most serious dx's he had.

What's JAMS?

I saw on another thread that your son had an IEP and was also involved with WRAP. I was told that with an IEP, my son couldn't utilize the WRAP program, that he had to use the school psych or social worker.

denak 10 years, 4 months ago

Costello,

You can also go to www.childally.org and sign up for free classes there. They are usually two hours long and are primarily intended for foster parents in order to keep up with their training requirements but as an adoptive parent, you can attend also.

Also, call the hospital. They have classes from time to time that deal with issues like that.

Dena:0)

Baille 10 years, 4 months ago

"That's interesting. I hadn't heard of these classes. Are you talking about additional MAPP? Or something else?"

The program was developed by the same people that developed MAPP and the trainers are trained the same way. I believe the train-the-trainers program is titled "Fostering and Adopting the Sexually Abused Child."

I am not sure there is a class that specifically deals with RAD. From my understanding "successful" treatment and/or parenting is very individualized and requires close cooperation between the parents and an effective child therapist.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.

loading...