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Archive for Tuesday, July 31, 2007

State GOP hopes loyalty committee will stop defectors

July 31, 2007

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— Burned by several high-profile party switchers, the Kansas Republican Party has formed a loyalty committee to make sure Republican officials toe the GOP line.

Under a change made to the state Republican Party's constitution, officials who hold party positions could be stripped of their party titles if they are found to be helping a Democrat get elected.

"There are times where the party needs to unite under just one banner," Kansas Republican Party executive director Christian Morgan said Monday.

"At the very base level, if you can't get county officers and district officers, if you can't get them to stop backing Democrats, then you have serious problems," Morgan said.

Morgan said if a Republican Party official decides he or she cannot help a fellow Republican, then the proper course of action should be to remain quiet.

"If you can't stomach a Republican in the election, then you can sit on your hands," he said. "You can't go out there and support the opposition."

The change was approved at the mid-year GOP convention Saturday. The loyalty committee will be headed by State Republican Party Chairman Kris Kobach, who sought the change.

Although the dominant party in Kansas, the Republican Party is split between conservatives and moderates. Kobach is a conservative. The party divide is often over abortion, with conservatives opposing abortion while moderates support abortion rights.

Andy Wollen, chairman of the Kansas Traditional Republican Party, said the loyalty committee was a bad idea.

"I don't know whether to laugh or cry," Wollen said. "It's just the latest demonstration that these people just flat don't understand people," he said.

Wollen said he believes that Republicans Party officials should support Republicans, but that forming a committee to investigate party loyalty would just make people angry.

"You don't coerce people into being loyal to the Republican Party. You have to earn loyalty," Wollen said. "You don't win elections by winnowing down your membership. You win elections by growing your membership."

Douglas County Republican Party Chairman Craig Campbell said Republicans should be loyal to their fellow party members but disagreed with the formation of the loyalty committee.

"I don't like saying that if you don't fit in our little box, let's kick you out," Campbell said.

He said a situation could arise when a candidate who is outside the realm of mainstream politics wins a Republican primary. Republicans shouldn't have to remain silent in such a case, he said.

Last year, moderate Republicans Paul Morrison and Mark Parkinson, a former state Republican Party chairman, switched to the Democratic Party, saying that the GOP had been taken over by narrow-minded conservatives.

Morrison defeated conservative Republican Atty. Gen. Phill Kline in a landslide, and Parkinson was elected lieutenant governor as part of the ticket of Democratic Gov. Kathleen Sebelius.

In addition, many Republicans have vocally and financially supported U.S. Rep. Dennis Moore, a Democrat whose district includes eastern Lawrence and Douglas County, and other Democrats. Moore defeated Kobach in 2004.

Morgan, the state Republican Party executive director, said he doubted that the loyalty committee would be used often. He noted it would take a four-fifths vote by the five-member committee to strip someone of their job title, and there is an appeals process.

Kansas Democrats said they have no similar committee.

Comments

Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

The Traditional GOP Values:

Limited Government Constitutonal Restraint Government Accountability and Transparency Strong Individual Rights Strong Separation of State And Church Fiscal Responsiblity

If you agree with these, you are a GOP traditionalist, and now a Democrat.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

oh man. did he really get booted?! i wonder what the straw was that broke the camel's back.. i see the responses to some of his comments about lieberman, but he must have really said something over the top. anyone know anything?

very funny uhlrick!

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

So then we agree. "You can't polish a ferd" is the post of the day.

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Kodiac 6 years, 8 months ago

Hey what happened to Ferd. I think he might have gotten himself booted again. Well daggum it. There goes the neighborhood.....

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

The aspect that I find most interesting from the KRP's actions is that it potentially sets up a perfect situation for a 3rd political party to really take root and have some real clout.

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd says: "I did in the very post you just responded to. It was UUFT's own web site. Here is it again: http://web.archive.org/web/2005110910374:"

Thanks, Ferd. I missed it. My bust.

As far as someone not being able to report on a story because they belong to a church, or even hold a position in a church organization in which the church has a set of beliefs or a particular belief that is different than the group that is the subject of the report, I still don't agree and you could probably find plenty of examples of that occurring on either side.

Also, I believe that you have mis characterized the situation in several ways. He was a member of a committee that decided that they would pay the taxes even though they were exempt from them to make a point about school funding. They said it should be up to the politicians - not a particular politician or party. It's no secret that the legislature was having a tough time coming to terms with their obligations on that matter.

The article comes from a periodical from UU, so that's a bit different than the other situations you cite. He happened to be on the committee and made a suggestion that the rest of the committee agreed with. I haven't seen anything that suggests that he held himself out there in his J-W capacity. And all I see is that he made some comments on how it came about, which appears to cross no line. And it is from early 2003. He wasn't the president then, was he?

To me, it looks like much ado about nothing. As far as not reporting the Soros connection, come on. I'm sure there's a bunch of related info that could have been reported, but then the story would become bloated with TMI, so much as to distract from the main point of the story.

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Jamesaust 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd: "Lieberman is one of a handful of true Democrats left in Congress."

Excuse me, Kevin, but Lieberman was re-elected with open support from many key Republican party officials in Connecticut - despite the fact that there was a Republican on the ballot. Please first denounce the Connecticut GOP machine that committed this treason and demand a Nutmeg State Loyalty Oath!

"If more Democrats were like him, I may not have left the Democrat Party in 1988."

Yeah, you a few hundred thousand other Dixiecrats.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

greyheim:

"lieberman lost due to the fact that he appeared (was) more loyal to bush's policy(ies) than he was to his consituents. he was out of touch with those who gave him his job in the first place. he has every right to kiss up to whoever he wants, but he was irresponsible and unable to convince his constituency of why he believed his position was the right one. he made the right move by changing his affiliation to independent."

If that's all true, why did Bill Clinton and other Democrats endorse him for the Democrat primary?

Lieberman is one of a handful of true Democrats left in Congress. If more Democrats were like him, I may not have left the Democrat Party in 1988.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"The only explanation for switching their endorsements to Lamont is party loyalty."

lieberman lost due to the fact that he appeared (was) more loyal to bush's policy(ies) than he was to his consituents. he was out of touch with those who gave him his job in the first place. he has every right to kiss up to whoever he wants, but he was irresponsible and unable to convince his constituency of why he believed his position was the right one. he made the right move by changing his affiliation to independent.


"That's the problem. As with the case with Ryun's maiiling, Rothschild's reporting is not fairly reported. Other examples can be cited."

this article is not about any of that. this article is about the kansas gop's loyalty committee. it is accurately reported, and rothschild's objectivity does not play into this specific article. if it was written by anyone else, the facts and objectivity would have been the same.

from the kc star: More angry were the pro-life conservatives, the very folks who turned the Republican Party into the lovefest it is today. Among the loudest objections, Kobach said, was that from former Kansans for Life president Tim Golba. Golba has proudly supported pro-life Democrats for office while continuing to vote on internal GOP matters, and he thinks he ought to be able to continue doing so. "I helped lead tons of Bible-believing Christians into the Republican Party," Golba told me. "And what they're saying is they don't want us in the party anymore." That's not at all what they're saying. But party loyalty comes first, Kobach said, adding, "I think it's a long time coming,"


that's not at all what they're saying, but .... that is... what.. they're........ saying...?

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

greyheim:

"if the articles were balanced, factually accurate, and fairly reported, as this one, why should there be a problem?"

That's the problem. As with the case with Ryun's maiiling, Rothschild's reporting is not fairly reported. Other examples can be cited.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"The Kansas Democrats may not have a formal loyalty committee"

-- exactly. which is why this is about the kansas gop forming a loyalty committee.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"If the J-W hired the president of that church and had him write articles on those issues, do you think the liberals in this town would stand for that?"

if the articles were balanced, factually accurate, and fairly reported, as this one, why should there be a problem?

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

greyheim:

"bottom line: the article is accurate. it is about a loyalty committee established by the kansas gop."

The article ignores the fact that Democrats also expect loyalty from its leaders. For example, look how many Democrats supported Lamont in Connecticut last year after he won the primary. These Democrats knew that Lieberman was clearly the superior candidate, yet they put party loyalty above competence and experience. Remember, many of these Democrats endorsed Lieberman before the primary. If they believed he was the best choice before the primary, why wasn't he the best choice after the primary? The only explanation for switching their endorsements to Lamont is party loyalty.

The Kansas Democrats may not have a formal loyalty committee, but we all know that they would never tolerate a party leader endorsing a Republican for office.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd, this story is about the kansas gop's loyalty committee.

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

greyheim beat me to it, but I second his comments about the relevance of ferd's comments.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

Tychoman:

"It's called getting both sides of the issue. Moron."

That's one of the complaints concerning Rothschild's biased reporting. Last August Rothschild wrote an article about Jim Ryun. The article concerned Ryun doing an energy mailing at taxpayers' expense. Rothschild went with Nancy Boyda's talking points about Ryun's use of franking privileges. That's one side of the issue. http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/aug...

The other side of the issue is that Rep. Dennis Moore, a liberal Democrat, did the very same thing as Ryun. Like Ryun's, Moore's mailout was done right before the deadline and concerned energy issues. However, Rothschild didn't report about Moore's mailing, even though Moore represents more Lawrencians than Ryun. In order to find out about Moore's franking, you had to visit a blog: http://www.kansasmeadowlark.com/

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd, I'm sorry, but you sound more ridiculous today than usual. The reporter here has reported on a factual, confirmed occurrence, not on a religious organization [unless you count the conservative wing religious (which might not be an unfair label after the establishment of the loyalty committee)]. As with each day, your comment become increasingly irrelevant as you further discredit yourself.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

bottom line: the article is accurate. it is about a loyalty committee established by the kansas gop. if the information in the article was somehow factually inaccurate, his integrity would be an issue, and all this would matter. but it's not, so let's talk about why the kansas gop feels the need to set up a loyalty committee.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

Uhlrick_Hetfield_III:

"If this isn't a religious organization, why would he care about church/state issues?"

I didn't say it was not a religious organization.

"The allegation was that "Scott Rothschild is a political activist who as recently as 2006 served as the president of a liberal organization in Topeka. That's deliberately misleading if not an outright lie."

It's absolutely true. When Scott Rothschild spoke for the social justice committee of the UUFT and delivered a check to a school along with a political statement, he was serving in the capacity of a political activist.

"How can you call yourself a conservative and yet want to deprive someone of their livelihood because of their religious beliefs? Does that also extend to their race, gender or ethnicity?"

It's called ethics. Above I showed that a reporter was terminated after she began advocating a political position. Rothschild crossed the line when he went from reporting on what legislators do to making a political statement concerning what he believes they should do. That's a very simple distinction.

"Ever hear of Terry Fox, Jerry Johnston, or Joe Wright? If a reporter attends one of their congregations should they be excluded from covering those issues?"

We already covered this. If they are rank and file members of those churches, that would be acceptable. After all, a majority of Americans belong to churches. However, if they served as a leader of those churches and started making political statements, as Rothschild did regarding the funding of education, a line has been crossed. A reporter cannot act simultaneously as a political activist.

"Never mind going that far, by your standard if a reporter's denomination, or faith tradition "has taken many stances on political issues" you want them off the story."

If the reporter is a leader of that denomination, yes.

"How about race? If I think racism is wrong, should I be pulled off those stories? Must a reporter be morally neutral on the issues of the day before they can write about them?"

Reporters are not required to be morally neutral. However, you would not expect a newspaper to assign race-related stories to a leader of the KKK or NAACP.

"Ad hominem attacks are logically irrelevant most of the time for any reason, but you've crossed some really frightening thresholds with these allegations against Rothschild. Indeed, I'm amazed that some of your religious right pals weren't the ones to take you to the woodshed."

You need to take a breath and think for awhile. Let's say an evangelical church in Lawrence is opposed to same-sex marriage, evolution, and abortion, and supports private school vouchers, intelligent design, and prayer in government schools. If the J-W hired the president of that church and had him write articles on those issues, do you think the liberals in this town would stand for that?

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

I missed something--when in this article did Rothschild report on his organization?

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

flock:

"I haven't seen or heard anything that states he was a leader or president. Care to back that up?"

I did in the very post you just responded to. It was UUFT's own web site. Here is it again: http://web.archive.org/web/20051109103748/http:/uuft.org/board.php

"For that matter, I'm a board member of a 501(c) organization. So, I guess I can't write about them or any opposition, right?"

If you were a reporter, it would be a conflict of interest to report on that organization.

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JJE007 6 years, 8 months ago

I second the nomination of Keith's "You can't polish a ferd." for POST OF THE DAY! ...only because it made me laugh. I can't verify the statement and I certainly don't wish to test it.

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd says: "Rothschild's case is different in that he was the leader (i.e., president) of the group."

I haven't seen or heard anything that states he was a leader or president. Care to back that up?

For that matter, I'm a board member of a 501(c) organization. So, I guess I can't write about them or any opposition, right?

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

fletch:

"So do the Southern Baptists. And the Catholic church. And just about every other church in America:.. So I'm not seeing your point. It's okay for some churches to be politically active as long as they agree with you?"

Yes, churches do take positions on issues. However, many of the rank and file in the Catholic Church take an a la carte approach to those issues. For example, there are many pro-abortion Catholics. Rothschild's case is different in that he was the leader (i.e., president) of the group. Leaders are expected to be more loyal to positions taken by the group. If UUA (again, what religion do UU members practice?) is against the Iraq war, is pro same-sex marriage, supports a living wage, and it is pro-abortion, is it ethical to have Rothschild report on those very same issues? http://web.archive.org/web/20051109103748/http:/uuft.org/board.php

The Kansas media made a big stink after Phill Kline merely spoke at evangelical churches. Can any liberal here honestly say that they would be comfortable with a leader of an evangelical church reporting on the same issues that Rothschild reports on?

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Tychoman 6 years, 8 months ago

"Could anyone imagine the president of the Kansas Republican Assembly reporting on Democrat Party happenings?"--Arminius.

Yes, Arminius. It's called getting both sides of the issue. Moron.

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Jamesaust 6 years, 8 months ago

"I don't see how this is any different than terminating a Coca-Cola driver for drinking Pepsi on the job."

It isn't - unless the Coca-Cola driver is the owner of Coca-Cola - just like Republicans "own" the Party, not the other way around.

Another day, down on the GOP Plantation!

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Jamesaust 6 years, 8 months ago

"Talk like that will get you a visit from the Loyalty Squad."

I already get visits after my checkbook closed.

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

And will the loyalty committee be giving Sam a call?

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

Oh my goodness, i missed this gem from RT:

"if Republicans could read a liberals mind. The thing is, you'd have to 'reboot' every day or more often, to keep up with the constant waffling."

And this from the party of Sam Brownback who voted both for and against the same bill in a 15 minute period and then tried to rationalize the flip saying he liked the idea, but not the bill. Quick what's Sam's position today?

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

"You can't polish a ferd."

I think you're in the running for post of the day.

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

I'm sorry, but you contradict yourself in your own post. First you say:

"The UU is more of a political organization than it is a religious one"

then you quote Rothschild as saying:

"There was a lot of concern about separation of church and state and why we should help the schools when it was really up to the politicians."

If this isn't a religious organization, why would he care about church/state issues?

But even that aside, this allegation is absolutely frightening from several standpoints.

  1. Had the allegation been "Rothschild is a member of a liberal religious denomination" I suspect no one would have complained about that point (the implications, yes, the point, no). But that's not what was posted. The allegation was that "Scott Rothschild is a political activist who as recently as 2006 served as the president of a liberal organization in Topeka." That's deliberately misleading if not an outright lie. The amount of information you left out was far more than the information you included and when you have to do that to make a point, you, sir, have no credibility.

  2. You then try and cover your tracks by saying "(try telling us what religion UU practices)".

I have no intention of trying to tell you what religion UU practices and you shouldn't have asked. Is there now a religion police that determines whether or not a religion is actually an appropriate religion? Can Hillary Clinton send them to your church if she gets elected to determine whether or not your church hasn't become a "political organization"? The question here is horrendous. How can you call yourself a conservative and yet want to deprive someone of their livelihood because of their religious beliefs? Does that also extend to their race, gender or ethnicity?

  1. "The fact is that UUA has taken many stances on political issues Rothschild covers for the J-W. This includes the living wage, same-sex marriage, the war in Iraq, education, and abortion."

Ever hear of Terry Fox, Jerry Johnston, or Joe Wright? If a reporter attends one of their congregations should they be excluded from covering those issues? Never mind going that far, by your standard if a reporter's denomination, or faith tradition "has taken many stances on political issues" you want them off the story.

How about race? If I think racism is wrong, should I be pulled off those stories? Must a reporter be morally neutral on the issues of the day before they can write about them?

Ad hominem attacks are logically irrelevant most of the time for any reason, but you've crossed some really frightening thresholds with these allegations against Rothschild. Indeed, I'm amazed that some of your religious right pals weren't the ones to take you to the woodshed.

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

"The fact is that UUA has taken many stances on political issues Rothschild covers for the J-W. This includes the living wage, same-sex marriage, the war in Iraq, education, and abortion. This creates a huge conflict of interest."

So do the Southern Baptists. And the Catholic church. And just about every other church in America..... So I'm not seeing your point. It's okay for some churches to be politically active as long as they agree with you?

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

great reporting on the reporter, ferd! still doesn't mean this article is false or incorrect. i know, i know, you already said that. redundant and all that. i, for one, would be saying the same thing if the article was about democrats in kansas, or anywhere, starting a 'loyalty committee'. i believe you should support the person you think is the best candidate for the job, regardless of party affiliation. but suggesting that one vote with one's party is not the same as setting up a 'loyalty committee'. dodd did what the repubs this committee was set up in repsonse to did. only the dems didn't start a 'loyalty committee'.

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

What is really interesting is that the loyalty committee was founded so that they could stop the GOP powergrab by the moderates who want to take their party back! Go moderates!!!

So what we are seeing here is the movement of the GOP moderates to fight to get their party back from the ultra-left religious fanatics in the GOP, of which Kobach is an example, ultra-leftist. And I side, as you all well know, with the moderates.

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americorps 6 years, 8 months ago

ferdinandlanghoff,

What you do not know about the UU can fill a library.

Please come back when you can make SUBSTANTIATED blanket statements about an entire group of people you know nothing about...

I would be interested in what you KNOW about Black people, Gay and Lesbian people and Jewish people as well.

The UU are very socially active, but that is not ALWAYS mean political, and each UU branch is allowed to define themselves. Some are more activist, some are more social and some are more spiritual.

But I will no longer bother you with facts, they detract from your point..

What was it again???

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

ferd says: "The UU is more of a political organization than it is a religious one (try telling us what religion UU practices)."

OK, if they are more of a political organization, then how would they be able to maintain their tax status?

So, again, your slam on someone is a major stretch when held to the light of day. As your statements evolve, he goes from Grand Poobah to a member that made a brief statement to a periodical published by the organization itself. And you dare question their credibility. Unbelievable!

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

The Religious Rite will be the end of the GOP on a national and state level. The demise is now happening. They can't raise money from anyone outside the Religious Rite. The Religious Rite is less than 13% of the US voting population.

So the question is: Which direction does the traditional GOPer go when they can't stand the Religious Rite.

The Religious Rite is also doing great damaging to national church attendence. The only way to get these people back into church is another 9-11, which I am positive Cheney is working on just now.

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

We must pledge loyalty to fWeureur!!!

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werekoala 6 years, 8 months ago

ferdie's just trying to distract from the main thread of this article -- that ties holding the Kansas GOP together are so threadbare that the only solution is forcing conformity. No more big tent. No more letting your conscience be your guide. Only blind allegiance to the party uber alles.

I'm sure it's a positive sign. Let me know how it works out for you all.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

flock:

The UU is more of a political organization than it is a religious one (try telling us what religion UU practices). In fact, the UU in Lawrence played a significant role in getting the living wage enacted in Lawrence (http://www25.uua.org/uufp/annual_reports/2002fjs.html). One of its past chairs, Graham Kreicker, wrote an opinion piece in the J-W promoting the living wage shortly before the city commission voted on the issue.

The fact is that UUA has taken many stances on political issues Rothschild covers for the J-W. This includes the living wage, same-sex marriage, the war in Iraq, education, and abortion. This creates a huge conflict of interest.

Consider this:

"Journalists cannot drop professional affiliation when it is convenient for them or for their cause. People who wish to work on behalf of a particular cause should work in public relations or advocacy groups, not for the news media. Journalists should confine their public voices to their own professional arena." - Deni Elliott, executive director of the Ethics Institute, Dartmouth College, FineLine: The Newsletter On Journalism Ethics, vol. 1, no. 6 (September 1989)

On at least on occasion, Rothschild went public to express his opinion on education funding:

"The decision wasn't a slam dunk," said member Scott Rothschild, who suggested the idea. "The social justice committee had a pretty thorough discussion about it. There was a lot of concern about separation of church and state and why we should help the schools when it was really up to the politicians. But in the end, people thought this was one year the funding situation was really bad so we should help out.'" http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4071/is_200301/ai_n9180255

Rothschild went from reporting on what legislators do to telling them what they should be doing. That's both unprofessional and unethical.

Several years ago, Vicky Hendley, an education writer for the Vero Beach (FL) Press-Journal was fired after sending letters of protest to 160 Florida legislators. Hendley was protesting the Supreme Court's ruling in Webster v. Reproductive Health Services.

Richard Wagner, managing editor of the Vero Beach Press-Journal, said Hendley stepped over the line of permissible activity when she became a news source. "It's very difficult to separate your profession from your political life when you grant interviews to other news organizations," he said. http://www.journalism.indiana.edu/gallery/Ethics/freepol.html

Rothschild made himself a news source when he granted an interview to another media source. He stepped over the line of what most newspapers concerned about ethics would consider permissible activity.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"I'll take a GOP loyalty committee over the Democrats' disloyalty committee, which is scheming to have our troops lose in Iraq."

that's a real intelligent argument. very original, too. can't defend, so he attacks.

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

http://www.kansascity.com/news/columnists/mike_hendricks/story/213657.html

"We're not compelling anyone to make a pledge to the GOP," said Christian Morgan, executive director of the state party. "You've just got to not endorse a Democrat."

Sad, and telling...

"You don't have to agree with us, you just can't disagree with us."

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

Uhlrick says: "The "liberal" organization that Rothschild belongs to is his church. A Unitarian I believe."

Uh oh, Ferd. The truth police are here to administer your daily beat down. Assume the position.

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ASBESTOS 6 years, 8 months ago

Republican Creed
I am a Republican because ...
I believe the strength of our nation lies with the individual and that each person's dignity, freedom, ability and responsibility must be honored.
I believe in equal rights, equal justice and opportunity for all, regardless of race, sex, creed, age or disability.
I believe free enterprise and encouraging individual initiative have brought this nation opportunity, economic growth and prosperity.
I believe government must practice fiscal responsibility and allow individuals to keep more of what they earn.
I believe the proper role of government is to provide for the people only those critical functions that cannot be performed by individuals or private organizations and that the best government is that which governs least.
I believe the most effective, responsible and responsive government is government closest to the people.
I believe Americans must retain principles that have made us strong while developing new and innovative ideas to meet the challenges of the times.
I believe Americans value and should preserve our national strength and pride while working to extend peace, freedom and human rights throughout the world.
Finally, I believe the Republican Party is the best vehicle for translating these ideals into positive and successful principles of government.

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jonas 6 years, 8 months ago

Said with the usual tact and restraint, eh Asbestos?

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

So you're saying you probably won't be running for that precinct committeeman position next time?

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ASBESTOS 6 years, 8 months ago

My Letter to the Kansas GOP:

You have to be kidding me, right? Why on God's green earth in these United States do we need this? If this is what you a$$holes call "leadership" count me out of the GOP. I am tired of the GOP NOT being conservative on their political stance, and spending all their political capital on "social conservatism" which has NOTHING to do with Goldwater Conservatism. What you are doing is facism.

I want to know who the idiot was that came up with this stupid and putrid idea.

This is a "purge" pure and simple.

I am now leaving the GOP as there is nothing here except "Bible Bangers" being represented here. No one is representing me in the party. You have turned this into the "Kansas Khristian Talibahn", the KKT.

IF this is the indication of the "leaders" in Kansas GOP, it just shows that you are rejecting the "true" conservatives, and the "RINO's" are those supporting illegal immigration, while spending political capital and credibility on things such as the "Evolution debacle", and abstinence sex education only, and all your other obsession about being sexually repressed.

You are the ones with the mental illness here, and VERY POOR POLITICAL JUDGEMENT and no leadership here whatsoever.

You are not increasing membership here, you are "purging" the membership.

Those that are left to follow you will only be able to donate to the church or the GOP, but not both. How will you fund your elections?

This state is gonna turn blue.

You f'ing make me sick.

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ASBESTOS 6 years, 8 months ago

Kansas will go blue next election because of these uptight people obsessed about sex and banging on Bibles!

Thank you for this latest example of Lack of Leadership in the GOP!

I am extremely pissed as this so called leadership.

What a bunch of morons!

"Put the party before the State and the Country!"

Good move (not)!

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ASBESTOS 6 years, 8 months ago

VERY VERY sad day for the GOP in Kansas.

I am officially rescinding my membership in the GOP and will not give the butts anymore money.

These flathead 'Christian Talibahn" members only is making me sick.

This is NOT CONSERVATISM in any way shape or form.

This is not about independent thought, but is about facism.

You party leaders make me wanna puke.

This is as bad as having Mel Martinez as Chair of the National GOP.

Singed:

Still a conservative but no longer a Kansas GOPer!

Stuff it Kansas GOP!

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

From werekoala:

"You can only insist on orthodoxy from your followers for so long without giving them something to show for their faithfulness."

Bingo!

They opposed gaming and the last three conservative speakers of the house became lobbyists for the gaming industry and promoted it. Kansas now has the only state owned gambling in the nation.

They opposed abortion and Kansas is the late term abortion capital of the country. In Wichita, the one district religious conservatives have held throughout, George Tiller is above the law and neither the city attorney, nor the DA has any meaningful opposition.

They demanded an end to rewarding illegal immigration and in the most cynical vote(s) ever cast, Sam Brownback voted both for and against the same Senate bill dealing with the issue.

They did succeed in running the moneychagers and crooks out of the temple of their party, but then found out where the resources came from that oiled the party's machinery all those years. Oops!

Time for a new strategery.

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werekoala 6 years, 8 months ago

How about a competence committee instead?

Seriously, this reminds me of how a company would rather spend billions advertising a crappy product, than redesign it to actually make a decent product.

It's the same root cause--everyone who has the power to address the problem also had a hand in creating it, so there's no one objective enough to notice how naked the emperor is.

I have a feeling the 2008 implosion fo the Republican party will be a case study for political scientists for years to come. You can only insist on orthodoxy from your followers for so long without giving them something to show for their faithfulness.

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

Ferd says: "However, as the Lopes' quote demonstrates, the Democrats in Kansas cannot complain about a loyalty committee when its leaders have urged the promotion of "purity" amongst their ranks."

When did D in KS complain?

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a_flock_of_jayhawks 6 years, 8 months ago

R_T says: "Americans won't put up with thisthe word is out."

Yeah, it was called the last election, and the voters made a statement. Get ready for another.

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

The "liberal" organization that Rothschild belongs to is his church. A Unitarian I believe.

Are religious conservatives really telling us that Rothschild's religious affiliation disqualifies him from covering politics? Really?

And what stories should a Southern Baptist cover? A Catholic? Could a Catholic cover stories about birth control, or abortion? And if they did, what then, sing a couple of verses of "Oh Papal Snakes"?

Read the story, if it's not good journalism, show us where he went wrong, but I don't know how much more hypocritical you can get than to imply that his faith disqualifies him as an objective journalist.

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Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 6 years, 8 months ago

The "traditional" Republican Party in Kansas has been a snake pit full of scoundrels and now that some of these Repukes can't get elected in their own party they're infesting the Democratic Party. Take a look at the scandals that have plagued Sebelius' second term and they're all related to these newly minted "Democrats" that have crossed party lines.

Be careful of throwing stones, you might want to kick the same crooks out of the Democratic Party in a year or two that are still dancing back and forth across party lines looking for the best deal and the biggest opportunity to line their own pockets. The last thing the Democratic Party needs is the garbage of the Kansas Republican Party.

If these new found "Democrats" are sincere, let them support real, traditional Democratic candidates for a few years while they earn their right to run under the Democratic banner.

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Richie Kennedy 6 years, 8 months ago

I don't see how this is any different than terminating a Coca-Cola driver for drinking Pepsi on the job.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

I'll take a GOP loyalty committee over the Democrats' disloyalty committee, which is scheming to have our troops lose in Iraq.

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yourworstnightmare 6 years, 8 months ago

A "loyalty committee"? Seriously? I mean, I give right-wing republicans in this state very little credit for intelligence and forethought, but this takes the cake.

This reeks of desperation. The vultures are circling the Kansas GOP. The pro-life right-wing liberals have ruined a once great power in this state.

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ndmoderate 6 years, 8 months ago

"Under a change made to the state Republican Party's constitution, officials who hold party positions could be stripped of their party titles if they are found to be helping a Democrat get elected."

I'm not surprised. So what if the KSGOP wants to circle their wagons. If you don't like it, then don't be a Republican party official. Any other person can still register as a Republican and vote however they want to in elections.

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

Rothschild must be intended to be just shy of a sideshow for LJW....what an in-your-face, no holds barred far-left liberal.

Smart management, really, on Simons part.

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sourpuss 6 years, 8 months ago

Perhaps if we had more than just two, narrow-minded parties to choose from, then we could find platforms that we would not have to be "loyal" to, but in which we actually believed.

Scary thought, that.

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bernard 6 years, 8 months ago

thank you to all who posted. Another day of entertaining reading of the pathetic state of Kansas GOP politics. Ahh Kansas!

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Pilgrim 6 years, 8 months ago

right_thinker (Anonymous) says:

Republicans want smart, not dumb voters. If they aren't there, so be it.


Thus the Demorat campaign mantra: "You're an idiot! Vote for me!" And their followers do, providing the proof.

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jonas 6 years, 8 months ago

"it's just a short lived fadirritating-yes, but short lived."

You mean like the right-wing punditry, that's been around for a decade or two, now? Irrational hate is a great seller in this political climate, and has been for some time. I don't see why you would expect the leftists to miss out on the fun while the getting's good.

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blackwalnut 6 years, 8 months ago

How very "Kansas" of them. What an embarrassment. You guys ought to clean up your party.

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

Ferdinand, Howard Dean couldn't pull off one single national political success, so he resorted to a hate and propaganda machine and the ensuing far-left hate blogo was long overdue and most welcomed by the likes of the stooges we see running wild on this forum ----and the dailykos, and mediamatters and moveon.......it's just a short lived fad---irritating--yes, but short lived.

Americans won't put up with this---the word is out.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

"The term is also probably meant as an ironic counterpoint to the traditional 'Yellow Dog' label, which is applied to Southern Democrats so loyal to the party that they would vote for a yellow dog before voting for a Republican." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Dog...

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

The Democrats' loyalty pledge in 2006 (note: Jim Dean is Howard Dean's brother):

http://tools.democracyforamerica.com/petition/standtogether/

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

So let me get this straight. The best defense anybody has of this absurd policy is to.... drum roll... attack the democrats.

Bravo, gentlemen. Bravo.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

right_thinker:

Have you noticed that the Democrats have put Howard Dean out of the picture during the past few months? He's being treated like the crazy aunt in the attic.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

In this case, the story appears to be true.

However, as the Lopes' quote demonstrates, the Democrats in Kansas cannot complain about a loyalty committee when its leaders have urged the promotion of "purity" amongst their ranks.

When Rothschild was the president of a liberal organization in Topeka, how long to you think he would have stayed in that position if he had started advocating positions contrary to those held by the organization?

Every organization expects loyalty from its members. Look at the national Democrats. Chris Dodd could not even endorse his long-time friend Joe Lieberman in the 2006 primary because his loyalty to the party was greater than his loyalty to Lieberman.

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Baille 6 years, 8 months ago

"Truth is just another word for nothing left to spin." - Bill O'Reilly, Who's Looking Out For Janis?, 1967

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"Rothschild's position as a liberal activist puts his credibility into question."

so this story isn't true, then?

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

"Let us promote the pure Democrats." - Steve Lopes, Demo Dialog (Douglas County Democrats' newsletter), February 1996

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max1 6 years, 8 months ago

"Max1, I see you have quickly learned the fine art of stereotyping an entire party with the example of a few." -Sigmund

It takes more than a few voters to win an election. Who do you think elects your flat-earthers? Space aliens?

http://www.kansascity.com/ A prominent female state senator [Republican Senator Kay O'Connor of Olathe] has said that she does not support the 19th Amendment, which guarantees women the right to vote, and that if it were being considered today she would vote against it. . . when league co-president Delores Furtado asked her if she was planning to attend the league's "Celebrate the Right to Vote" luncheon. "You probably wouldn't want me there because of what I would have to say," O'Connor told Furtado.


"The mission of women is to be beautiful and to bring children into the world. The female bird pretties herself for her mate and hatches eggs for him. In exchange, the male takes care of gathering food, and stands guard and wards off the enemy." -Joseph Goebbels

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

Keep on following Howard Deans lead, moveon, dailykos, all the hate and propaganda, far-lefties. It'll come around and bite ya'. Howard Dean has been so busy promoting a hate and propaganda smear machine for the far-left, he has found himself in a bit of a dilemma:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory?id=3416105&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312

What a frigging goober---what's that constant goofy look all about? You guys are nearing the end of your far-left fad.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

fletch:

"Uh oh, they don't like the story. Time to attack the messenger."

Rothschild's position as a liberal activist puts his credibility into question. For example, Rothschild the messenger failed to report the Kansas Traditional Republican Party's connections to George Soros.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"Scott Rothschild is a political activist who as recently as 2006 served as the president of a liberal organization in Topeka."

which means this story is not true, right ferd?

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Baille 6 years, 8 months ago

Yep.

"If you can't attack the position, attack the proponent." - Baille, Essays on Some Unsettled Questions of Political Colostomies, 1974.

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max1 6 years, 8 months ago

"the Republican Party does not have a monopoly on KKK membership." -Sigmund

Sign the loyalty oath or shut the hell up! - Kris K Kobach

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americorps 6 years, 8 months ago

BrianR (Anonymous) says:

":the noecon and Christian Supremecist minority assumed power of the entire party:"

Have we learned nothing from Footloose?


LOL, good one.

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

"Scott Rothschild is a political activist who as recently as 2006 served as the president of a liberal organization in Topeka."

Uh oh, they don't like the story. Time to attack the messenger.

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

BTW, there is more on this topic to be found here: http://www.cjonline.com/stories/073107/sta_188000024.shtml

I think that the committee is really focused on one person at this point in time, because he is supporting a GOP moderate and giving money to the GOP moderate.

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ferdinandlanghoff 6 years, 8 months ago

Scott Rothschild is a political activist who as recently as 2006 served as the president of a liberal organization in Topeka. It is an outrage that the Journal-World allows him to cover stories such as this one. Could anyone imagine the president of the Kansas Republican Assembly reporting on Democrat Party happenings?

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

Hatred is flamed up big time! See this, from "rite-thinker", I am sure you won't mind the spelling change for it cannot make you hate more than you already do:

"Sebelius and Morrison and their ilk are fortunate to be in a state where so many back-woodsy people live. Case in point, my kids tell me their Grandpa , my x's dad, just loooooves Kathleen Sebelius-loves her!!! Guess what, he's staunchly pro-life. That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless."

It is you that perhaps are failing to see the clues. If you were "right", this issue would never have come up, there would have been no defectors.

I ask you: Who is setting the GOP agenda? Who is dictating what the GOP is to stand for and what it is not standing for? I want to know why the GOP voters do not have a voice on what the GOP stands for? The only voice they have now, since few GOP leaders are listening at the state and national level to their GOP voters, is to vote Democrat and/or defect.

You, riter, are the clueless, the back-woods blind voter, the wife-less, the hater.

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

I remind those that seem to think that Kansas is red: Typically there are only two counties that vote Democrat in elections, Wyandotte and Douglas. Last election, the entire eastern third of Kansas voted blue.

The GOPers, the Morphed Ones, have a lot to worry about because the GOP environment is ever more challenged than last election.

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

Can you say "Heil GOP" Then click your heels in unity?

I can't.

Gods, it seems like we have a Nazi Germany all over again.

AND I am traditional GOP.

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

"Republican Party does not have a monopoly on KKK membership"

That's pretty disloyal talk. Perhaps you need to sign the Loyalty Pledge again.

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Sigmund 6 years, 8 months ago

Max1, I see you have quickly learned the fine art of stereotyping an entire party with the example of a few. Congrats, you'll be a full blown ideologue in no time flat! BTW, the Republican Party does not have a monopoly on KKK membership. While the Republicans kick former KKK members out of office, the Democrats make them the senior Senator from West Virginia!

Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. Byrd has held the office since January 3, 1959; he is the longest-serving member in the history of the Senate. He is also the longest-serving, and oldest, current member of the United States Congress. Prior to that elctoral success, Byrd joined the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), was unanimously elected Exalted Cyclops, or leader, of his local chapter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_B...

There is a lot of quotes in the Wikipedia entry I could have included, but given how sensitive the LJW Online editors seem to be today, I doubt they would have allowed those epitaphs beginning with the letter "N", even when they are a direct quote from a United States Senator!

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

Admendment: third-party Conservative Christian groups to replace Christian groups.

It is the small portion of the GOP that call themselves Conservative Christian GOPers. And of course we know right now, that even those people, those leaders, are not immune to losing children to suicide.

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BrianR 6 years, 8 months ago

"...the noecon and Christian Supremecist minority assumed power of the entire party..."

Have we learned nothing from Footloose?

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Machiavelli_mania 6 years, 8 months ago

IF the state GOP does not allow the KS GOP voters to set the GOP agenda (which they are not (!)allowing at present time, so much so that many GOP traditionals have already defected) , if the GOP agenda is set and maintained by people other than the Kansas voters (Rove comes to mind here), then there is absolutely no reason (!) why a GOPer should not defect.

You want to know what happens at those GOP women's group meetings? I can absolutely assure you that they are not setting GOP agendas. They are getting together and doing bullhockey things like "well, what will we do for the next funf-raiser?," and then the only monay they raise comes from the attendees of those meetings.

One traditional GOP lady that goes to those meetings says that she doesn't doesn't know who sets the GOP agenda.

The group that sets up those meetings is not GOP. They are third-party Christian groups.

So who sets the GOP agenda?

And thus we see the reason why people in droves are fleeing the GOP party. Until some changes take place, many GOP Traditionals will be voting Democrat when they so choose, and they will defect if they feel alienated by the leadership of their party. Kobach, ... Buddy, this is YOU and your agenda that they are leaving.

I know this information to be fact. Been there, done that.

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max1 6 years, 8 months ago

"Mr. Morgan, it is you who are destroying the Republican party." -Sigmund

How can one person be blamed for "destroying" a political party dominated by flat earthers? Now take the loyalty oath or shut up!

"Republicans want smart, not dumb voters." -right_thinker

Pledge your allegiance to the flat_earth party or shut up! " "Either you're for us or you're against us." -GW Bush, October 4, 2001

http://dir.salon.com/story/news/feature/2005/05/13/kansas/index.html [Former Kansas State School Board chairman and Republican Goober-natorial candidate] Steve Abrams himself still publicly admits he is a so-called young-Earth creationist - one who believes Earth is as little as 5,000 years old, based on a reading of the Bible.

http://www.albionmonitor.com/0505a/scopes2.html [Republican State school board member] Kathy Martin said "intelligent design is science-based and strong in facts."

http://www.kshs.org/publicat/khq/1974/74_3_sloan.htm Ben S. Paulen, who, with the support of the KKK, secured the Republican nomination for [Kansas] governor.

http://www.kansascity.com/ A prominent female state senator [Republican Senator Kay O'Connor of Olathe] has said that she does not support the 19th Amendment, which guarantees women the right to vote, and that if it were being considered today she would vote against it.

"Hydrogen power is an imaginary creature in the land of Leftie-ism, much like "price gouging." ' -Jamesaust http://davidgardiner.net/Tomorrow_Belongs_to_Me.mp3

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Lonestar1 6 years, 8 months ago

As a former Republican, (I was told I was a RINO) I am sooooo.. glad I switched parties. I guess that makes me a right wing Democrat. At least Democrats do not need a loyalty committee! Moderate Republicans in Kansas need to march on over to the other side. There's no room in the Kansas Republican party for you!

"If you can't stomach a Republican in the election, then you can sit on your hands," he said. "You can't go out there and support the opposition." Christian Morgan

Wake up Christian!! This is America, we can support who ever we want!

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

"My understanding is that the Kansas GOP is near bankruptcy. I wonder why."

Talk like that will get you a visit from the Loyalty Squad.

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Baille 6 years, 8 months ago

Next thing you know the KS GOP will be putting together death squads. Maybe Ollie North could get them funding.

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Jamesaust 6 years, 8 months ago

My understanding is that the Kansas GOP is near bankruptcy. I wonder why.

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jonas 6 years, 8 months ago

right_thinker (Anonymous) says:

"That's one of the dumbest statements I've ever read on this forum. Sebelius and Morrison and their ilk are fortunate to be in a state where so many back-woodsy people live. Case in point, my kids tell me their Grandpa , my x's dad, just loooooves Kathleen Sebelius-loves her!!! Guess what, he's staunchly pro-life. That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless. Republicans want smart, not dumb voters. If they aren't there, so be it."

For sheer irony, I don't even have to add anything to this.

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scenebooster 6 years, 8 months ago

"Republicans want smart, not dumb voters. If they aren't there, so be it."

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA........

......HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH!

Yes, indeed (wiping tears from eyes). That's why gay marriage and the "culture wars" are perennial campaign topic for the GOP...'cuz their base is so smart.

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Sigmund 6 years, 8 months ago

Dorthyhr, you cannot seriously be asserting that the Democratic Party allows any more freedom of thought from its membership than the GOP. Tell that to Sen. Joseph Lieberman, any democratic canidate that supports a partial birth abortion ban, or any democrat who believes that if there is global warming it might be caused by changes in solar output and not man made. If that fails to convince you compare Nancy Boyda's and Jim Ryun's voting record with their leadership. I would bet neither were more than a couple of percentage points off of each other and neither were below 95% of being in lock step with their leadership.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"That's one of the dumbest statements I've ever read on this forum."

do you read your own posts, r_t?

"That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless."

how they "stay" in power? see above.

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

"...control with fear...."

Hey! That'd been a great working title for "An Inconvenient Truth"

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toefungus 6 years, 8 months ago

All organizations, regardless of their purpose, eventually find themselves looking inward instead of onward. I don't know why that happens. Protecting a failed system or idea or product becomes the reason for existing. It takes significant external forces to change that. We could be seeing the end times of the neocon model of governing. The Republicans have a lot of good people in their ranks. Eventually a new leader will emerge and push the party to adopt new ideas. The wagons are circling and that is a good sign that change is bearing down. I like many Republican principals, so I welcome the change. Bring it on.

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americorps 6 years, 8 months ago

I predicted this years ago, when the noecon and Christian Supremecist minority assumed power of the entire party, that after a few years, they would begin to unwind.

I find it very telling that instead of trying to make their case with logic, trying to sell their ideas, they do not bother and instead try to control with fear and intimidation and power.

Nothing sadder than a rat on a sinking ship.

I do not want everyone to believe as I do, i see the need for many viewpoints in running a nation, but one thing I will always catagorically reject, without hesitation and with vehemence, is someone who wants to force me to believe as they do.

The Neocons and Christian Supremecists are not loosing because they believe differently than most Americans, they are loosing because they are thugs and bullies.

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fletch 6 years, 8 months ago

Last time I checked, it was an elected official's job to serve the people, not their party.

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

"Hiel GOP!!"- dorothy

Ward Churchill would be proud of you.

What do you mean 'freedom of thought'. Do you mean freedom of speech? Are you saying Republicans want to take away your right to think something, as warped and twisted as it may be? That's an interesting idea, if Republicans could read a liberals mind. The thing is, you'd have to 'reboot' every day or more often, to keep up with the constant waffling.

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 8 months ago

Democrats do not have to follow the party line lock step. They can disagree, because they believe in freedom of thought and the right to believe what you want as long as you don't force yourself on others. I'm sure RT has already signed his loyalty oath. He probably has a book from his party to make sure he doesn't stray from the party line when posting. Everyone is welcome in the Democratic party, even if you sometimes vote for Republicans. Apparently, this isn't going to be allowed in the Republican party. Will your party leader go into the voting booth with you too? Hiel GOP!!

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

"That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless."

No, they stay in power because their voter base is largely aware of the larger picture and wouldn't cast a vote based on a single issue, as you are suggesting that your children's grandfather should.

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logicsound04 6 years, 8 months ago

"Guess what, he's staunchly pro-life. That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless."


An interesting point, seeing as how Republicans hold the majority AND this is a consistently red state.

I will agree, however, that the voting base in Kansas is largely clueless--see: "Republicans hold the majority"

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

"Freedom of thought is not their cup of tea."

That's one of the dumbest statements I've ever read on this forum.

Sebelius and Morrison and their ilk are fortunate to be in a state where so many back-woodsy people live.

Case in point, my kids tell me their Grandpa , my x's dad, just loooooves Kathleen Sebelius--LOVES HER!!!

Guess what, he's staunchly pro-life. That's how Democrats stay in power, have a voter base that is largely clueless.

Republicans want smart, not dumb voters. If they aren't there, so be it.

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Sigmund 6 years, 8 months ago

Mr. Morgan, it is you who are destroying the Republican party. To paraphrase your idiotic comments, "at the very base level, if you can't get county officers and district officers, if you can't get them to stop DEFECTING, then you have serious problems." The results of the last election demonstrate just how serious those problems are and this "loyalty oath" smacks of group think fascism that is the root of the problem. It would serve the GOP well for you to be at the head of lemmings as they go crashing over the cliff.

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greyheim 6 years, 8 months ago

"with room for both conservative and moderate Republicans. Hmmmmmmmmm:."

but not democrats.

seriously, i wonder how the rwing wackos will spin this one.

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logicsound04 6 years, 8 months ago

Disturbing image of Kansas? The KRP is just following in the footsteps of "daddy" (National party)...

Don't agree with us?

Then F you.

The funniest part about all this is that I remember several months ago, Republican party members talking about how their party is a "big tent", with room for both conservative and moderate Republicans. Hmmmmmmmmm....

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staff04 6 years, 8 months ago

Ahhh...the "big tent."

Gestapo, anyone?

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 8 months ago

I've long suspected that the new style conservative Republicans did not adhere to American values. Freedom of thought is not their cup of tea. Maybe they'll require tatoos like Voldemort. Scary, sick stuff here.

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i_tching 6 years, 8 months ago

No political party is more important than our state, our country, nor our Constitution, but that kind of thing is lost on Republicans. They value their party more than they value our democracy, and it shows in the polls.

The leading Republican presidential candidate is "none of the above."

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bernard 6 years, 8 months ago

These right wing wackos continue to provide the nation with a disturbing image of Kansas. Will their next effort be to strip Republican's of their party credentials if they express a belief in evolution?

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