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Archive for Sunday, February 11, 2007

Susan G. Komen foundation unveils ad campaign to beat breast cancer

February 11, 2007

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— The pink ribbons will still adorn everything from teddy bears to yogurt lids. But now, Susan G. Komen for the Cure also is taking a more provocative approach with its familiar symbol.

New billboards across the nation feature the organization's logo and a woman's upper body in a T-shirt that reads: "We only focus on one thing. Or, depending on how you look at it, two."

The nonprofit dedicated to finding a cure for breast cancer has about 100 billboards in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

A separate print ad features a woman in a tank top with a message promising to pummel breast cancer "until it's good and dead. Not just horror movie dead but really, truly dead. And then we're going to tie a pink ribbon on it."

The agency also recently printed a number of shirts for celebrities and friends of the organization that read "If You're Going to Stare at My Breasts, You Could At Least Donate A Dollar to Save Them."

The ad campaign is one of several new steps the Komen organization is taking on its 25th anniversary to move its efforts to a new level.

The largest private source of funding for breast cancer research has a lot to celebrate - rising survival rates, an increase in federal dollars for research, and greater early detection of the disease, founder Nancy Brinker told 1,000 breast cancer activists at the organization's annual conference in Dallas on Friday.

But the group's work is hardly done, she said.

"The race is not won," Brinker said at the two-day event. "We're on the verge of turning breast cancer into a manageable disease. Our mission is to wipe it from the face of the earth."

The foundation is planning several new initiatives. In addition to the ad campaign, the organization aims to make cancer an issue in the 2008 elections, Brinker said. It plans to invest $1 billion in breast cancer research and community health and education programs in the next 10 years.

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