Advertisement

Archive for Thursday, August 23, 2007

NAACP official: Let Vick play again

NFL urged to allow QB to return after serving sentence

August 23, 2007

Advertisement

— An NAACP leader said Michael Vick should be allowed to return to the NFL, preferably the Atlanta Falcons, after serving his sentence for his role in a dogfighting operation.

"As a society, we should aid in his rehabilitation and welcome a new Michael Vick back into the community without a permanent loss of his career in football," said R.L. White, president of the NAACP's Atlanta chapter. "We further ask the NFL, Falcons, and the sponsors not to permanently ban Mr. Vick from his ability to bring hours of enjoyment to fans all over this country."

White said the Falcons quarterback made a mistake and should be allowed to prove he has learned from that mistake.

On Monday, Vick said through a lawyer that he will plead guilty to a federal charge of conspiracy to travel in interstate commerce in aid of unlawful activities and conspiracy to sponsor a dog in an animal-fighting venture.

Three Vick associates have pleaded guilty to the conspiracy charge and say Vick provided nearly all the gambling and operating funds for the "Bad Newz Kennels" dogfighting enterprise. Two of them also said Vick participated in executing at least eight underperforming dogs, raising the possibility of the animal-cruelty charges.

Last month, state and local leaders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People urged the public not to rush to judgment in the Vick case. The civil rights organization said animal rights groups, talk radio and the news media were vilifying the embattled athlete and that his team and corporate sponsors were prematurely punishing Vick.

Comments

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

If by "speechless," right_thinker, you mean that you've temporarily lost your ability to copy/paste the usual "sp-liberal progressive" crap that makes up 99.9% of everything you've posted here... well, then I'm glad, 'cause we're all probably due for even a momentary break.

Meanwhile, as far as Imus goes, I stand by my original assertions:

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/apr/10/imus_radio_show_suspended/#c331920

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/apr/10/imus_radio_show_suspended/#c331924

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/apr/10/imus_radio_show_suspended/#c332317

Imus may have invoked some racist language, but he chose the wrong targets. That's why he got fired. Maybe, when he starts up again in a few weeks, he'll have learned his lesson.

Agnostick agnostick@excite.com http://www.uscentrist.org

0

Bubbles 6 years, 8 months ago

I guess that blacks live by a different set of standards then the rest of society.

0

Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

"Race had nothing to do with the Imus firing."- Ag

I...ummm......uuuhhh......I.........am speechless.

0

jonas 6 years, 8 months ago

"White said the Falcons quarterback made a mistake and should be allowed to prove he has learned from that mistake."

Bah! He didn't commit a mistake at all. He knowingly and intentionally tortured animals to the point that they were willing to kill each other, and then let them kill each other. You don't suddenly go "Whoops! I just tortured a dog into violence, how the hell did that happen?" The NAACP must be hankering for press these days, to even consider condoning this act.

By all means, when he gets out let him have a job. He can do the jobs that other ex-felons do, such as over-the-road trucking, garbage collection, etc. If the NFL's stated policy is that convicted felons are not allowed to play (and I don't know if that's true or not) then he should not be allowed to play. Either way, allowing someone of Vick's obvious flaws to continue to operate in the league would further tarnish the NFL's (National Felon's League, anyone?) already substandard reputation.

"We further ask the NFL, Falcons, and the sponsors not to permanently ban Mr. Vick from his ability to bring hours of enjoyment to fans all over this country."

Right, because he couldn't be replaced in a minute, and no one would notice.

0

Marion Lynn 6 years, 8 months ago

gogoplata wrote:

"NAAWP The National Association for the Advancement of White People. That sounds racist."

Marion writes:

And The National Association For The Advancement Of Coloured People does not?

WOO HOO!

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

And I'm sorry you can't see things for what they are, r_t, because, as Manolo told Tony Montana, "Joo got joo head up your culo."

Race had nothing to do with the Imus firing. The suits and the lawyers saw that he'd crossed the line when he insulted a group of average, "private citizens"... not like his usual targets: elected officials, public officials, public figures, celebrities.

--Ag

0

Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

Agggggggggie, I'm sorry you can not see things for what they are due to your fence-ridin' nature.

0

Godot 6 years, 8 months ago

Bubbles, very interesting perspective. NFL is vile.

0

Bubbles 6 years, 8 months ago

Leonard Little Leonard Little St. Louis Rams - No. 91 Defensive end Date of Birth: October 17, 1974 (1974-10-17) (age 32) Place of Birth: Asheville, North Carolina
Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) Weight: 263 lb (119 kg) National Football League Debut 1998 for the St. Louis Rams Career Highlights and Awards First-team All-SEC (1997) First-team All-American (1997) Pro Bowl selection (2003)

Career History College: Tennessee NFL Draft: 1998 / Round: 3 / Pick: 65 Teams:

St. Louis Rams (1998-present)

Stats at CBS Sportsline.com Leonard Antonio Little (born October 19, 1974 in Asheville, North Carolina) is an American football Defensive End who currently plays for the St. Louis Rams of the NFL. He attended the University of Tennessee.

After a drunken birthday in 1998, NFL star Leonard Little crashed into and killed another motorist, Susan Gutweiler. When tested, his blood alcohol level measured 0.19 percent. Little received 90 days in jail, four years probation and 1000 hours of community service.

Six years later, Little was again arrested for drunk driving and speeding. Little was acquitted of driving while intoxicated, but was convicted of the misdemeanor speeding charge.[1]

On Week 11 of the 2006 NFL season, Little signed a 3-year extension with the Rams

0

Bubbles 6 years, 8 months ago

Just a little perspective comparing a dog killer to a human killer.

http://www.nndb.com/people/032/000045894/

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

right_thinker... As expected from your usual, illogical idiocy, you're once again swallowing the Moby Dick-sized red herring, as far as Imus is concerned.

If you believe it was a racial incident, you're an even bigger "ho" for Sharpton than Tawana Brawley was.

Imus was fired--and rightfully so--because he put his employers at risk of a major libel suit...

Agnostick agnostick@excite.com http://www.uscentrist.org

0

Godot 6 years, 8 months ago

The NAACP did not come out in favor of a second chance for Pete Rose. All Pete did was bet on other games; as a result, when he was found out, his career was ruined.

0

Tom Shewmon 6 years, 8 months ago

Yet Don Imus says "nappy-headed ho" and is sh*tcanned from two major media.....at the behest of a Grade AAA race-monger.

God Bless America.

And F-it!

No wonder people are pissed off.

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

Word. Bring yer mutt. We'll have us a rumble, homey

0

craigers 6 years, 8 months ago

I have to give you props on that one Agnostick.

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

National Association for the Advancement of Cruelty to Puppies

0

Godot 6 years, 8 months ago

People say that Vick has not lived up to his potential as a football player. Could be that he intentionally played badly, depending on how he placed his bets.

0

kneejerkreaction 6 years, 8 months ago

It was the head of the NAACP in Atlanta that said he should keep his job. The acting head of the National Chapter was much more prudent in saying that it should be up to NFL Officials.

0

TheHeartlessBureaucrat 6 years, 8 months ago

I think the NAACP was just making sure that due process was observed. Not so much a race card, but a strong presence to make sure that things were done right. Now...will a poor african american get the same coverage? Heck no.

In my opinion, if he were working as a school teacher or raising kittens or doing something where certain demeanor was required, then yes, he should lose his job. But his job is to act aggressively toward an opponent. It is in his job description to put the proverbial "smack down" on folks who his coach tells him to. (forgive my ignorance if that's not true in the playbook) But if you're going to be a cruel, primitive and heartless individual, this seems like the right job.

And NO, I'm not saying that football players are cruel, primitive or heartless by nature. We all are. But most of us, including most pro athletes, can control it. If these charges turn out to be true, it might be an indicator that he cannot control these impulses.

So, NO, I think he should keep his job.

THB

0

gogoplata 6 years, 8 months ago

NAAP - National Association for the Advancement of People. Much better.

If it involves a group for the advancement of a specific race must have something to do with race.

0

mick 6 years, 8 months ago

What does this have to do with race? It doesn't do much for the credibility of the NAACP.

0

kneejerkreaction 6 years, 8 months ago

NAAPM - National Association for the Advancement of Praying Mantis - it's time we stopped discriminating against these bugs.

0

Das_Ubermime 6 years, 8 months ago

NAAClP (National Association for the Advancement of Colorless People) sounds albino.

0

macon47 6 years, 8 months ago

Vick is an embarrassment to Professional sports, as well as his race. The NAACP, should merge with ACLU And change their name to Black and white liberalwhiners. BAWL

0

gogoplata 6 years, 8 months ago

NAAWP The National Association for the Advancement of White People.
That sounds racist.

0

Defender 6 years, 8 months ago

"I thought it was absurd that neither of the two women discussing the topic mentioned or seemed to conceive any connection between these violent tendencies and his career in American football, which is considered a barbaric sport by most people around the world:

Yeah, that is why there have been a bunch of riots, deaths, and burned down stadiums at American football games. Oh....wait.....that's not Amrican football. My God, but that is the most idiotic, unfounded, and unprovable statement ever made. Are you drunk or something?

0

Confrontation 6 years, 8 months ago

I find Vick's torture of animals to be absolutely disgusting and don't care if he ever sees another game. However, I still want to see this type of outrage towards those athletes who beat their wives. Why do most people value women less than dogs? Sad.

0

kneejerkreaction 6 years, 8 months ago

Animals don't intentionally kill in the wild. It's not in their nature, they simply want to dominate, usually for territorial & reproductive reasons. Do an Internet search and find out what Vick and others have to do to these animals to make them kill. Then tell me if you want Vick given a second chance.

0

blue73harley 6 years, 8 months ago

This is more than playing a race card. It is throwing the whole damn deck. Why the NAACP would want to stand up for this fool is beyond me.

0

Tony Kisner 6 years, 8 months ago

What did MLK say? Judge a man not by the color of his skin but the content of his character? Is that what RLWhite is doing here?

0

waydownsouth 6 years, 8 months ago

A few years ago people protrayed Pitbulls as a violent and vile dog. Noboday wanted them next door because they were unpredictable. Bans all across the US went up in neighborhoods that you can not have these dogs as pets. Unless you lived in the country. Alot of places in Lawrence you can have them and a few others. When Floyd Boudreaux was caught very few said anything about all the dogs and puppies that were put down. Now sombody is caught fighting these very dogs and now everybody feels sorry for the pit bull. Bet you all want to save the chickens in cock fighting too. Serve them for dinner tonight maybe?

0

ralphralph 6 years, 8 months ago

Even if you leave out the part of maiming and killing dogs, and even if it were not a felony, Vick needs to be barred. Why? He was running a criminal gambling operation. How hard is this, really?

0

yourworstnightmare 6 years, 8 months ago

It is too bad that the NAACP has resorted to mindless defending of any african american and strayed away from thoughtful representation and advocacy.

Does the NAACP really want to be on record as defending Michael Vick in this case? Especially when the NFL has explicit rules about player conduct?

0

aeroscout17 6 years, 8 months ago

Oh yeah, like prison actually rehabs anyone...

0

Emily Hadley 6 years, 8 months ago

I saw a cable news show talking about how disturbing this was, because the extreme nature of the alleged acts suggested that Vick had violent tendencies and could be dangerous outside of dog fighting. They both seemed overwhelmed, horrified, and baffled by his violent potential.

I thought it was absurd that neither of the two women discussing the topic mentioned or seemed to conceive any connection between these violent tendencies and his career in American football, which is considered a barbaric sport by most people around the world.

I think that, regardless of whether one enjoys watching football, it is obvious that the level of aggression required in that sport takes a specific personality, and guys who play football at all levels -- a sport in which your skin will literally split on impact if not taped, shielded, and padded -- tend to be very physically aggressive and often violent. I have certainly seen it first hand in junior high, high school, and college football players.

0

TheOriginalCA 6 years, 8 months ago

I am a big believer in second chances. Michael Vick deserves a second chance.. AFTER he repays his debt to society and is rahabed to the point to where he is safe to re-enter society. If he still has playing years left at that point, then yes, let him back in the NFL.

0

Bubarubu 6 years, 8 months ago

@waydownsouth: "Why what he does in his personal life be punishable in his professional life."

Because the contract he signed says so. Both the team and the league have the right to void his contract for conduct detrimental. Certainly federal conviction on dogfighting and gambling charges would qualify. There are plenty of careers beyond professional sports where personal conduct is punishable in the professional realm.

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

waydownsouth:

"B-O-O

"H-O-O."

--"John Bender"

Thanks

Agnostick agnostick@excite.com http://www.uscentrist.org

0

packrat 6 years, 8 months ago

I quit the NAACP almost 10 years ago. I was called a traitor at the time.

Everytime I read something like this, I am affirmed in my decision.

0

kmat 6 years, 8 months ago

Losing his sports career has nothing to do with being convicted of a felony. It's the fact the he's a sick, sick man that obviously enjoyed hurting animals.

What's the common thread amoungst serial killers? They all started out injurring and killing animals.

How can anyone support a person that enjoys and makes money from killing dogs? This guy was worth millions and had a career that very few can get, but chose to fight and kill dogs. We know it wasn't for the money, so obviously he's a sick, nasty man.

0

Marion Lynn 6 years, 8 months ago

This is typical of the NAACP. Long gone are the days of Roy Wilkins who would have had Vick flogged!

0

Defender 6 years, 8 months ago

Sorry, waydownsouth, I do not believe that anyone would be going to see movies of a movie star that did this, or buying the records of a singer that did this. This is the kind of thing that ruins your career, period.

0

Das_Ubermime 6 years, 8 months ago

Had I committed a felony, I would lose my job. Furthermore, I would probably be unable to find another job in my career. I imagine that such a thing is true for most of the Americans who are not celebrities. Don't you think it is elitist to encourage one set of rules for celebrities and another for the rest of us?

0

waydownsouth 6 years, 8 months ago

Why what he does in his personal life be punishable in his professional life. You would hate to be fired for what you do in your own home. But the rules are always different for the NFL. Had it been a movie star they would still be making movies. And people would still go see them. Same for singers. But a football player or a basketball player and everyone wants to hang them at the stake. Yeah he got caught and he will be charged justice served.

0

Agnostick 6 years, 8 months ago

Speaking of dogs, NAACP National HQ needs to put a muzzle on Mr. White...

Agnostick agnostick@excite.com http://www.uscentrist.org

0

EasyTiger 6 years, 8 months ago

If the only news out of the NAACP since the whole Imus bullsh*t is them coming out to defend Michael Vick, they have truely proven themselves an antiquated institution. They do little these days but reinforce negative stereotypes rather than champoin the heroic advances of civil rights and equality. Just another misguided, back-peddling, special interest group that doesn't give a damn about anyone except themselves.

0

Bubbles 6 years, 8 months ago

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People obviously have a very low social standard for the Blacks that they represent. The rest of society is trying to pull Blacks up out of the gutter but the NAACP keeps beating them back down.

What a bunch of useless self serving low lifes.

0

Crossfire 6 years, 8 months ago

National Association for the Advancement of Criminal People Gambling and racketeering charges pending...?

White said the Falcons quarterback made a mistake... This mistake went on for six years. That is 2190 days making the same mistake.

He did not do this alone. Other players and coaches had to know. After he drops the dime on his team-mates I doubt he will be welcome back to the stadium or the Atlanta Underground.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.