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Archive for Monday, September 18, 2006

Pope’s explanation insufficient to satisfy all Muslim leaders

September 18, 2006

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— Pope Benedict XVI said Sunday that he is "deeply sorry" his remarks on Islam and violence offended Muslims, but the unusual expression of papal regret drew a mixed reaction from Islamic leaders as the Vatican worried about a backlash of violence.

Some Muslim leaders accepted the statement. Others said it wasn't enough, but urged Muslims to avoid violence after attacks on churches in Palestinian areas and the slaying of a nun in Somalia.

Benedict said he regretted causing offense with his speech last week in Germany, particularly his quoting of a medieval text that characterized some of the teachings of Islam's founder as "evil and inhuman" and referred to spreading Islam "by the sword."

He said those words did not reflect his own opinions.

"I hope that this serves to appease hearts and to clarify the true meaning of my address, which in its totality was and is an invitation to frank and sincere dialogue, with great mutual respect," the pope said during his weekly Sunday appearance before pilgrims.

It was an unusual step for a leader of the Roman Catholic Church. Benedict's predecessor, Pope John Paul II, issued a number of apologies during his papacy, but they dealt with abuses and other missteps by the church in the past rather than errors on his own part.

Vatican officials had earlier sought to placate spreading Muslim anger by saying Benedict held Islam in high esteem and stressed that the central thrust of his speech was to condemn the use of any religious motivation for violence, whatever the religion.

While Benedict expressed regret his speech caused hurt, he did not retract what he said or say he was sorry he uttered what proved to be explosive words.

Pope Benedict XVI addresses the faithful in his summer palace in Castel Gandolfo, on the outskirts of Rome. The pontiff said Sunday that he was "deeply sorry" about the angry reaction sparked by his speech about Islam and holy war and said the text did not reflect his personal opinion. "These (words) were in fact a quotation from a Medieval text which do not in any way express my personal thought," Benedict told pilgrims at Castel Gandolfo.

Pope Benedict XVI addresses the faithful in his summer palace in Castel Gandolfo, on the outskirts of Rome. The pontiff said Sunday that he was "deeply sorry" about the angry reaction sparked by his speech about Islam and holy war and said the text did not reflect his personal opinion. "These (words) were in fact a quotation from a Medieval text which do not in any way express my personal thought," Benedict told pilgrims at Castel Gandolfo.

Backlash against Christians

Anger was still intense in Muslim lands.

Two churches were set on fire in the West Bank, raising to at least seven the number of church attacks in Palestinian areas over the weekend blamed on outrage sparked by the speech.

There was also concern that the furor was behind the shooting death of an Italian missionary nun at the hospital where she worked for years in the Horn of Africa nation of Somalia. The killing came just hours after a Somali cleric condemned the pope's speech.

"Let's hope that it will be an isolated fact," the Rev. Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, was quoted as saying by the Italian news agency ANSA.

He said the Vatican was "following with concern the consequences of this wave of hate, hoping that it does not lead to grave consequences for the church in the world."

Police across Italy were ordered to step up security out of concern that the anger could cause Roman Catholic sites to become terrorist targets. Police outside the pope's summer palace confiscated metal-tipped umbrellas and bottles of liquids from faithful.

Mixed reaction

Benedict's expression of sorrow for the offense he caused satisfied some Islamic leaders.

The head of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, a banned group but still the largest Islamic movement in that country, said the outrage was justified but predicted it would subside quickly.

"Our relations with Christians should remain good, civilized and cooperative," Mohammed Mahdi Akef told The Associated Press in Cairo.

Germany's Central Council of Muslims welcomed the pope's comments Sunday as "the most important step to calm the protest" and urged the Vatican to seek discussion with Muslim representatives to avoid lasting damage.

But others were still demanding an apology for the words, including in Turkey, where questions have been raised about whether Benedict should go ahead with a visit scheduled for November as the first trip of his papacy to a Muslim nation.

"It is very saddening. The Islamic world is expecting an explanation from the pope himself," Turkish State Minister Mehmet Aydin told reporters in Istanbul. "You either have to say this 'I'm sorry' in a proper way or not say it at all. Are you sorry for saying such a thing or because of its consequences?"

Comments

Kelly Powell 8 years, 3 months ago

and they show their outrage of being called violent by burning churches and shooting a nun....irony.

Sigmund 8 years, 3 months ago

A notorious Muslim extremist told a demonstration in London yesterday that the Pope should face execution. Anjem Choudary said those who insulted Islam would be "subject to capital punishment".

That should teach the world to call us violent...

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23367232-details/The+Pope+must+die%2C+says+Muslim/article.do

Sadly this link is not to The Onion

kristyj 8 years, 3 months ago

From an Islamic extremist group '"[the pope] and the West are doomed as you can see from the defeat in Iraq, Afghanistan, Chechnya and elsewhere. ... We will break up the cross, spill the liquor and impose head tax, then the only thing acceptable is a conversion (to Islam) or (killed by) the sword."

Islam forbids drinking alcohol and requires non-Muslims to pay a head tax to safeguard their lives if conquered by Muslims. They are exempt if they convert to Islam.'

from- http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/europe/09/18/pope.islam.ap/index.html

For all that the Muslims want religious tolerance for themselves, I don't think a head tax on non-Muslims is very religiously tolerant. Maybe it's just me though.

bjamnjm 8 years, 3 months ago

Nothing but hypocrisy in the outrage shown by "the Muslim world". I am so sick of every time someone says something, reads something outloud or draws something deemed offensive that obligatory and childish rape and pillage must occur. While I have no respect for this I do pay attention. We are undoubtedly in a fight to the death and they are very committed. Good posts so far and refreshing. I expected to read this article and see demands for the Pope to apologize some more or better or something. These Muslims... they really need to develop an ability to laugh at themselves.

Lepanto1571 8 years, 3 months ago

'"[the pope] and the West are doomed as you can see from the defeat in Iraq, Afghanistan, Chechnya and elsewhere. ... We will break up the cross, spill the liquor and impose head tax, then the only thing acceptable is a conversion (to Islam) or (killed by) the sword."

Yep, definitely an argument one should use against a man who has just brought into question the relationship of your religion to violence!

as_I_live_and_breathe 8 years, 3 months ago

Germany's Central Council of Muslims welcomed the pope's comments Sunday as "the most important step to calm the protest" and urged the Vatican to seek discussion with Muslim representatives to avoid lasting damage.

Oh sure, the Pope should JUMP at the chance to meet with these guys. They are so peace loving, trustworthy and kind. Every one KNOWS the muslims excell at peacefull discourse.

I would recommend he wear his metal collar to deflect the sword during his beheading.

as_I_live_and_breathe 8 years, 3 months ago

wouldn't it be funny if one the virgins they get in heaven is the nun they just killed.....oopps

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