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Archive for Sunday, November 5, 2006

Plane crashes near Wellsville; no one injured

Pilot is safe after hard landing

November 5, 2006

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— A Baldwin man was not injured this morning after he landed a single-engine, fixed-wing plane in a field west of Wellsville after the engine lost power.

According to a Kansas Highway Patrol report, Michael Dann, 50, was flying from Ottawa to Gardner in the 1949 Luscombe plane.

At 11 a.m., he heard a loud bang from the engine and then a grinding noise just before the plane lost power. Dann then landed the plane in a field near 4353 Utah Road in Franklin County.

On the ground, the plane continued south across a driveway and struck a line of trees before coming to rest in a field, according to the report.

Comments

Marion Lynn 7 years, 5 months ago

How, true!

I should get over the fear of small planes as driving is really more dangerous!

I think that it may be the illusion of control generatied by the four wheels.

Thanks.

Marion.

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aeroscout17 7 years, 5 months ago

Ah, but Marion, the small aircraft can land in smaller areas!

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Marion Lynn 7 years, 5 months ago

Yes, the guy was obviously very familiar with the First Law Of The Air:

"Maintain thy airspeed lest the ground reach up and smite thee in the a++!"

And one heckuvapilot!

I have ben in a single engine craft whichlost the engine, right outside of Lawrence and it is indeed a harrowing esperience, especially when the real pilot let's go of the stick and says to you, "Here! You fly it!"

It was a dual-control job so I held onto the stick for dear life while the pilot laughed his kiester off!

the plane had a stall speed of around 26 mph so there wasn't a whole lot of danger but that didn't make me feel any better about the whole thing.

he landed it just fine and had a lot of fun telling the guys in the bars about my reaction.

On another occasion years ago, I sat in the co-piot's seat of an old DC-3 while on a "freight run" (Read; rapid, surrepitous and "The Federalis are right behind us!" flight!) when the co-pilot who had drunk the water, became violently ill.

five minutes after I strapped in, the right enigne starved for fuel and stopped.

Well, Gooney Birds WILL fly on one engine but they don't like it and will lose altitude if heavily loaded.

The two guys in the back threw out everything that weighed over five pounds and were starting to look at me when after the mumbling of some incantations, the sprinkling of Holy Water and fiddling with switches and pumjps, the recalcitrant engine came back to life and didn't miss a beat all the way to Texas.

When looking for a place to set down, open fields are good, highways are good and places where there are soft things to run into can be good.

Trees, hills, rocks and cows are bad.

I do not really like small aircraft as you can well imagine.

Thanks.

Marion.

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compmd 7 years, 5 months ago

holygrailale,

Agreed. Although saying he landed "safely" might be stretching it. That aircraft hitting a tree line likely ripped it apart. However, getting a (most likely) minimally instrumented aircraft down after engine failure and being able to walk away is heck of an accomplishment.

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holygrailale 7 years, 5 months ago

Marion is correct.

A loud bang is a "bad thing", a "very bad thing" when flying.

The guy must be a hell of a pilot. He probably had no warning, no power and landed safely.

Hell of a job. His money is no good in any bar I'm in.

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Christine Pennewell Davis 7 years, 5 months ago

glad all is well in this accident, agreed marion.

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spym00se 7 years, 5 months ago

How did he decide which open field to land in?

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Marion Lynn 7 years, 5 months ago

That "bang" is the same "BANG!" which appears in the Road Runner cartoons when Wile E. Coyote gets blown up but in an airplane it is real and always means that somthing very bad has happened.

The guy landed and any landing from which one can walk away is a good landing!

Good for him!

Thanks.

Marion.

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