Archive for Tuesday, February 28, 2006

Work zone?

February 28, 2006

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To the editor:

In reference to your recent article about the speed limit on West Sixth Street, Wakarusa to Kansas Highway 10, I would like to offer my opinion.

I use this street twice a day, five days a week. Leaving in the afternoon and returning around 11:30 p.m.

Let's keep in mind this is a newly constructed, very wide, nice, safe road. Directly adjacent to this street there are no schools, residences or businesses. The one thing conspicuously absent as well is construction, i.e. "work zone." I haven't seen a contractor there in months!

The speed limit signs (40 mph) are not your average everyday signs you're accustomed to seeing. They are about two-thirds the average size with a small orange tab on top titled "work zone." Are we to understand that KDOT has designated this street as a "permanent" work zone or what?

Why doesn't the contractor, when present and working, just put out the temporary caution signs we're all accustomed to and remove them when done.

I think the speed limit on this street should be 45 mph at the minimum and remove the infamous double-your-fine "work zone" signs. It's very disconcerting to see three patrol cars lurking in the dark at 11:30 p.m. waiting to pounce on the unsuspecting when they should be out in the neighborhoods suppressing crime.

Gary S. Gill,

Lawrence

Comments

b_asinbeer 9 years, 2 months ago

Mr. Gill: I concur.

It's all kinda like the work zones in highways. They close 18 miles just to work on 1/4 of a mile at a time (that is, if they decide to work that day). Very interesting how work zones operate.

Ragingbear 9 years, 2 months ago

They HAVE determined that Sixth Street is a permanant work zone. They convinced some local yokel that it is better to make a cruddy road, and resurface it every year, than to make a decent road and only have to do some work on it every 5-10 years.

But get this. The ancient Romans made many roads, and there are many that are still in use today. They did not anticipate heavily vehicles like cars and trucks. Nor did they anticipate the sheer volume of traffic. Yet they are still in use, after 2000 or more years. Still in use.

So why, oh why can't we make a friggin road last more than 3 years in America?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 9 years, 2 months ago

While I agree that roads could and should be better constructed, I believe you overestimate considerably how much old Roman roads are in use today.

craigers 9 years, 2 months ago

Just obey the traffic laws and they won't have to line their pockets with YOUR money. Seems pretty simple to me.

craigers 9 years, 2 months ago

I will agree with that wolfmn but so many people are mad at speed traps when it really shouldn't matter where the cops are located if you are driving lawfully.

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