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Archive for Sunday, October 9, 2005

More seniors against teaching evolution

Less than half of Kansans 65 or older think Darwinism belongs in schools

October 9, 2005

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The nearer to God, the nearer to God.

At least that is one explanation why older Kansans tend to shy away from evolution.

Less than half of Kansans 65 and older believe evolution should be taught in public schools, as opposed to two-thirds of the rest of Kansans, according to a Lawrence Journal-World and 6News poll.

"One might be more willing to believe in God and the hereafter as one approaches," death, quipped Allan Cigler, a Kansas University political science professor.

Cigler said a more plausible explanation is that older people tend to attend church more than the remaining population.


Bob Cumpton participated in today's Journal-World poll and believes that both creationism and evolution should be taught in school. With him in their Lecompton home is his wife, Jo.

Bob Cumpton participated in today's Journal-World poll and believes that both creationism and evolution should be taught in school. With him in their Lecompton home is his wife, Jo.

Bob Cumpton, 75, of Lecompton, however said he thinks it's a question of fairness when it comes to whether to teach evolution.

"If you believe in Christianity and God, that's one theory, and evolution is the other theory. Everybody should have a choice," said Cumpton, who participated in the poll.

For Cumpton, it's Christianity.

And when asked whether God and evolution can be held together, the older-than-65 group had the lowest percentage - about half - who supported that position.

Cumpton said he didn't believe evolution and God were compatible. "You're talking about riding a fence now and you've got to be one way or the other," he said.

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