Archive for Sunday, December 5, 2004

Briefly

December 5, 2004

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Washington, D.C.

Kerry gives money to Democratic races

John Kerry is giving $250,000 to support Democrats in disputed elections in Washington state and Louisiana and forming a new fund that could help his future political ambitions.

Kerry is forming a political action committee that will allow him to donate to Democrats in local, congressional and governor's races in the next two years, as well as promote his agenda.

Kerry spokesman David Wade said the Massachusetts senator had wired $200,000 to support another recount in the Washington governor's race. Democrat Republican Dino Rossi was certified as the winner Tuesday, but Democrat Chris Gregoire was only 42 votes behind.


Louisiana

Stun gun kills driver

A man sheriff's deputies had shot twice with a stun gun died Saturday, a day after he was pulled over for driving erratically, officials said.

Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office spokesman John Fortunato said Patrick Fleming died at a hospital. Officers had used a Taser stun gun on him twice when he fought with them -- once after the traffic stop and then later at the jail.

Fortunato said Fleming, 35, was hospitalized after officers zapped him a second time and his breathing became labored.

Fortunato said the office would have no further comment Saturday. There was no immediate word on when an autopsy would be conducted to determine the cause of death.

Guantanamo Bay

Taliban suspect goes before tribunal

A high-ranking Taliban fighter accused of planning attacks on U.S. coalition forces went before a military review tribunal Saturday in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The prisoner, 58, was accused of leading a group of 12 members of the al-Qaida terrorist network and the ousted Taliban regime in planning attacks on U.S. coalition forces, said Lt. Gary Ross, a spokesman for the Combatant Status Review Tribunals.

It was not clear what the detainee said at his hearing. The military has not released transcripts from the review tribunals, which are meant to determine whether some 550 prisoners at the U.S. naval base are correctly held as "enemy combatants" or should be freed.

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