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Archive for Wednesday, October 15, 2003

Self attending NABC meeting

Coach taking part in emergency ethics discussion

October 15, 2003

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Kansas University men's basketball coach Bill Self would rather be studying practice plans and chalk-talking with his assistants and players today than attending an emergency meeting of the National Association of Basketball Coaches in Chicago.

"I think the timing is bad. It is not great. I also don't know if there is great timing for this sort of thing," Self said before heading to the O'Hare Airport Hilton for today's meeting with all 327 Division One coaches.

They are gathering to discuss "accountability and ethical conduct of all NCAA coaches" in the wake of offseason scandals at Baylor, Georgia, Fresno State, Iowa State and St. Bonaventure.

"I certainly believe something positive can come out of it," Self said. "I think in order for that to occur, we have to go in with an open mind that this is good for the whole."

Some coaches have been grumbling about heading to Chicago just two days before the start of preseason practice. Coaches were told they either attend the meeting or lose ticket rights to the 2004 Final Four.

"Something some coaches are upset about is they are forcing us to attend with the threat of revoking our ticket privileges," Self said. "Some coaches feel like, 'We have to attend or else,' and that doesn't sit well with everybody.

"I personally do not think this is a bad idea. I think it's unfortunate we've gotten to the point this is necessary. I don't think any coach would disagree our organization can get stronger, and this may be a first step in it becoming stronger."

NABC president Kelvin Sampson, coach at Oklahoma, has high hopes for the meeting.

"We hope that this summit will provide a basis for our coaches and our association to proactively move forward toward greater integrity in our sport," he said.

Self is a believer in the NABC.

"The NABC has been a strong organization, but it needs to get stronger," Self said. "Ninety-seven percent of the things happening in college are positive, but there have been some serious things that have occurred this past year that will be addressed, and we will talk about how we can better handle situations."

The NABC was founded in 1927 and claims more than 5,000 members.

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