Advertisement

Archive for Monday, March 31, 2003

Briefly

March 31, 2003

Advertisement

Afghanistan: Rockets fired into capital

A rocket slammed into the headquarters of the international peacekeeping force late Sunday in Kabul. There were no reports of injuries.

The compound, consisting of several buildings surrounded by high stone walls, is located across the street from the heavily fortified U.S. Embassy. Few peacekeepers were present at the time.

"At this point it appears that a building may have been damaged," German peacekeeping spokesman Lt. Col. Thomas Lobbering said.

A second rocket hit the Pul-e-Charkhi area, on the eastern edge of the Afghan capital. There were no reports of injuries there either.

Police said the rockets were fired from several miles east of Kabul.

The city is patrolled by nearly 5,000 peacekeepers, a 22-nation force under the command of Germany and the Netherlands.

Michigan: Gunman ends feud at church

A gunman stood up during a church service Sunday and repeatedly shot a man with whom he had been feuding, killing him, police said.

At least seven people were injured trying to flee the building in Rochester Hills, some by leaping out windows, authorities said.

The priest at St. Paul's Albanian Church was preparing to distribute the sacrament when the attacker stood up, yelled, "Yes, I am here" and shot the victim in the back of the head and several more times after that, a witness said.

The shooter, whose identity was not released, was in custody Sunday evening, but had not yet been charged, police said.

Virginia: Airline out of bankruptcy

US Airways leaves bankruptcy today to test whether its reorganization was sufficient to help it survive a time of unprecedented financial turbulence in the airline industry.

The airline will maintain its focus on the eastern United States, with a slightly expanded presence in the Caribbean, said US Airways spokesman Chris Chiames, in Arlington.

In its business plan, the nation's seventh-largest airline projects a profit of more than $100 million next year based on revenue growth of 13 percent, although the forecast was formulated before the Iraq war's start. The company has lost more than $3.8 billion during the last two years.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.