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Archive for Sunday, March 29, 1998

Also from March 29

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ULA LOUISE LASTER
March 29, 1998
Services for Ula Louise Laster, 81, Ottawa, formerly of Wellsville and McLouth, will be at 1 p.m. Monday at the Wilson and Son Funeral Home, Wellsville. Burial will be at the McLouth Cemetery. Mrs. Laster died Saturday, March 28, 1998, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
KANSAS COUNCIL TO BEGIN PLAN ON PROMOTING TOURISM
March 29, 1998
The Kansas Council on Travel and Tourism will begin a series of events aimed a promoting a new tourism strategy for the state. The Kansas Tourism Strategic Plan will have its first public show Monday at the Lawrence Holidome. The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 9 a.m. Additional meetings will be held in Hays, Dodge City, Wichita and Overland Park. For more information or to make reservations, call 865-4411.
FAIR TO LINK WORKERSEMPLOYERS
March 29, 1998
An employment fair is set for Saturday at the Lawrence Riverfront Plaza Factory Outlet.
CAN CORPORATIONS MAKE DONATIONS DIRECTLY TO POLITICIANS? IF SO, HOW MUCH? AND ARE THE DONATIONS TAX DEDUCTIBLE?
March 29, 1998
According to the Federal Election Commission, corporations may not contribute directly to candidates for federal office or to influence the outcome of a federal election. They may however contribute to political action committees, which may contribute to candidates. The prohibition against direct corporate campaign contributions does not apply to state or local elections. But corporations should abide by legal state spending limits. The maximum amount corporations may donate to candidates for statewide office, such as governor or attorney general, is $2,000 per election. The maximum allowable amount to candidates for Kansas Senate is $1,000 per election. And the maximum allowable amount to candidates for Kansas House or local elected office is $500 per election. Corporations may contribute up to $15,000 a year to Kansas state political parties and up to $5,000 a year to each of their county affiliates.
ROLLOVER ACCIDENT CAUSES SERIOUS INJURY
March 29, 1998
At least one person was seriously injured in a rollover accident Saturday night near the Douglas-Jefferson county line. Medical crews were called to the accident scene on U.S. Highway 24-40 in Jefferson County about 11:10 p.m. Saturday. The vehicle had rolled several times and was about 15 feet from the highway in a field near Hamm Quarry Inc.
PAINTER PLACES THIRD AT NCAAS
March 29, 1998
Kansas sophomore Tyler Painter placed third in the 1,650-yard freestyle Saturday at the NCAA men’s swimming championship. Painter of Greeley, Colo., finished the event in 14 minutes, 54.31 seconds — a school record. Arizona’s Ryk Neethling won in 14:32.50, followed by Chris Thompson in 14:46.29.
LAWRENCE GYMNASTS TUMBLE TO CHAMPIONSHIP
March 29, 1998
The coach of a Lawrence gymnastics team took some good-natured ribbing from her students when she broke out in tears when the standings were announced.
STATE ISSUES REMINDER ON HEPATITISVACCINATIONS
March 29, 1998
The Kansas Department of Health and Environment is reminding parents about new immunization guidelines for children starting school. The department is recommending that children entering kindergarten this fall should be in the process of completing the Hepatitis B vaccination series. When the 1999-2000 school year starts, all children will be required to have the vaccinations.
SAVAGE ACT
March 29, 1998
To the editor: I have always enjoyed the pictures in the “Friends and Neighbors” section of the Journal-World. However, it was all I could do to look at the picture on March 23.
COMMISSION NOTES
March 29, 1998
Lawrence city commissioners already have a pretty good idea about how they want to move ahead to ease a perceived parking crunch in downtown Lawrence, but they will get a chance to make their feelings official — and hear public comment — Tuesday night. Staffers have compiled a list of ideas commissioners discussed or endorsed during a March 18 study session at city hall. Here’s what they came up with:
IN 1898
March 29, 1998
On March 29, 1898, the Lawrence World reported: “The department of Paleontology at the university has just received an order from the National Museum, Washington, DC for a lot of duplicate fossil reptile material from Western Kansas now in the museum. The funds received from this sale will enable the department to make an extended expedition to the fossil field of the west next summer.” — Courtesy Watkins Community Museum
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
March 29, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * Stereo equipment was stolen from a car between midnight and 8 a.m. Monday in the 1800 block of West 25th. Total loss and damage was $1,995.
S PARKING SITUATION FOR SEVERAL MONTHS BEFORE ISSUING ITS REPORT EARLIER THIS MONTH.
March 29, 1998
The ideas up for endorsement Tuesday do not specifically reflect one of the task force’s primary suggestions: Building a 375-space garage along the west side of Vermont Street, between the Lawrence Public Library and the Lawrence Senior Center. The garage would be across the street from Lawrence Aquatic Center, 727 Ky., as well as the chamber’s offices, 734 Vt. Officials also have discussed the possibility of building a bridge across Kentucky Street, between the garage and the aquatic center.
COLLEGES LEND HELP TO STUDENTS
March 29, 1998
Universities across the country are taking steps to assist students suffering through the economic crisis in Southeast Asia, according to the New York-based Institute of International Education. Within the academic year, almost all colleges surveyed by the institute and by NAFSA: Association of International Educators found creative ways to assist students, including delayed tuition plans, tuition waivers, increased on-campus employment, loans and loan referrals.
MIKE YODER/JOURNAL-WORLD PHOTO
March 29, 1998
Rebecca Hinshaw, 8, gets some assistance from her step-sister Sally Jennings, 18, during last year’s Douglas County 4-H Free Fair. Jennings, a member of the Lone Star 4-H Club won overall champion Brangus during the beef show at the fair.
SPOTGARDEN?
March 29, 1998
Spring is here and the flowers are beginning their show. Do you know of a beautiful garden around the Lawrence area or its surrounding communities that could be featured in The Garden Spot? Give us a call or write us to let us know where we can find it. You can call Jill Hummels, features editor of the Journal-World, at 832-7150. Voice mail messages are also welcome.
HISTORY AND MEMORIES: 1948 WAS EVENTFUL
March 29, 1998
If you graduated from high school or college in 1948 you just may be headed this spring for a class reunion. In our case it will be the 50th from college for my wife. I thought you might be interested (in case you didn’t remember) in some of the things going on in ‘48. That was the year Harry Truman gleefully held up a Chicago Tribune front page that read DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN. Some Democrats had deserted Truman. Henry Wallace formed his Progressive Party, and Strom Thurmond and other Dixiecrats walked out of the convention, and most of the pollsters said Truman would lose. Well, he didn’t.
PLACES AND FACES
March 29, 1998
The Kansas Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Topeka named John Myers vice president of marketing and member services. He had been president of the Greater Austin (Texas) Chamber of Commerce. Myers, a native Kansan, received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Kansas University and is a former director of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce Convention and Visitors Bureau. He also has served as director of economic development for the Lawrence chamber. John Reinhart, a former assistant to Gov. Bill Graves, has been named director of communications. The Kansas University graduate also has been director of government relations for the Kansas Press Assn., a Kansas reporter and editor, and a lobbyist and media/community relations consultant. *
ADOPTION INFORMATION
March 29, 1998
People interested in more information about adoption in the local area can call the Kansas Families for Kids adoption hot line at 1-800-210-5387. Local agencies and the Lawrence office of the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services also can offer assistance for parents on both side of the issue.
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FAILS, CUTS POWER IN CITY
March 29, 1998
More than 1,200 businesses and homes were without electricity for more than an hour Saturday when two power outages hit southeast Lawrence. A “lightning arrester,” a device that sits on top of a utility pole and guards against lightning strikes or other power surges, malfunctioned near the East Hills Business Park, causing a power surge at 1:40 p.m. The outage affected 1,282 businesses and homes bordered by 23rd and 31st streets and Louisiana Street and the east city limits.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WILL CONSIDER MONDAY WHETHER TO APPROVE A SPEED LIMIT CHANGE FOR FOLKS ROAD.
March 29, 1998
County staff recommend establishing a 35-mph speed limit for Folks Road from the Lawrence city limits north to North 1700 Road, also known as Peterson Road. The limit change would also apply to Peterson Road from Folks Road east to Kasold Drive. A traffic study counted between 686 and 889 cars per day on those portions of Peterson Road. Folks Road carries approximately 393 cars a day. Speeds on the roads averaged from 44 to 48 mph on the roads, but residents say many drivers seem to travel much faster.
* CONSIDER APPROVAL OF LONE STAR LAKE SKIING DATES FOR 1998.
March 29, 1998
* Consider approval of a memorandum of agreement for a hazardous material planning grant. * Consider approval to advertise for global positioning survey equipment.
ANDERSON, A TEACHER AT CENTRAL JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL, HAS BEEN NAMED A KANSAS MASTER TEACHER FOR 1998.
March 29, 1998
* Proclaim April “Toastmaster Month.” The local Toastmaster Club — which focuses on speech-giving abilities as well as leadership, management, evaluations, effective thinking, listening and conduct of productive meetings — is one of more than 8,300 clubs with more than 180,000 members in 65 countries. * Proclaim April “Fair Housing Month,” marking the 30th anniversary of passage of a federal fair housing law as part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which guaranteed that people cannot be discriminated against in housing. The city’s current law prohibits housing discrimination based upon a person’s race, sex, religion, color, national origin, age, ancestry, familial status, sexual orientation or disability.
BEE SPELLED VICTORY FOR LOCAL RESIDENT
March 29, 1998
Some 40 years ago, Kansas resident Jo Hutson spelled success with big words. This year’s Kansas spellers are gearing up for statewide competition in Topeka next Saturday.
ON THE ONE HAND, GLOVES HAVE THEIR DETRACTORSON THE OTHER HAND, THEIR FANS
March 29, 1998
To glove or not to glove? Gardeners find different gloves are best for different tasks.
ADOPTION FILLS FAMILY VOID
March 29, 1998
The trend in open adoptions is giving more parents a say and help with adoption.
DISMISSALS
March 29, 1998
Mitzi Eisenhauer and infant son, Lawrence, Saturday. Noreena Williams and infant daughter, Lawrence, Saturday
WOODLING COLUMN
March 29, 1998
Maybe this will be the summer the Royals hit rock bottom. Perhaps this is the year the team that won the 1985 World Series will sink to its lowest depths. Then again, maybe not.
BALDWIN, WHICH PROVIDES POWER TO ITS RESIDENTS, IS FACING SEVERAL UNANSWERED QUESTIONS WITH THE POSSIBILITY OF UTILITY DEREGULATION.
March 29, 1998
Cities such as this electricity-producing town south of Lawrence are breaking down the costs associated with making power in anticipation of private competition. But officials in Baldwin — which already has generators and electrical lines — question whether such competition will actually mean lower prices, or just result in deregulation headaches.
BUSY BUSES
March 29, 1998
Bus service is an important link to independence for many local senior citizens. Reports that local bus service is declining need immediate attention. An effort to coordinate three bus services for low-income, elderly and disabled residents in Lawrence seemed like a good idea, but so far, the results seem to be falling short.
VENUS, JUPITER DUE FOR CLOSE ENCOUNTER
March 29, 1998
Here’s a look at significant stellar events this month. Wednesday: Saturn, Mercury and Mars are all so close to the sun that we won’t be able to see them for some weeks. Jupiter and Venus are the only accessible bright planets and only in the morning. Look for Venus low in the southeast before sunrise, with Jupiter even closer to the sun. These two will team up for a spectacular conjunction in about three weeks.
LEAKY PLANS WRECK RETIREMENT DREAMS
March 29, 1998
Here’s how to find out if your plan is a good one, and some things you can do try to change it.
SCULPTURE SHOW TAKES FORM
March 29, 1998
The works of two Lawrence sculptors are among those chosen for this year’s Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition.
STUDENTS FEEL PAIN OF ASIAN ECONOMY
March 29, 1998
Kansas University students from Southeast Asia are facing a difficult battle: surviving the effects of an economic crisis.
OKLAHOMA TOOK THE FIRST GAME, 13-4, THEN THE JAYHAWKS RALLIED FOR A 20-11 VICTORY IN THE SECOND GAME OF A BIG 12 TWINBILL AT HOGLUND-MAUPIN STADIUM.
March 29, 1998
Seven hours. Seventeen innings. Forty-eight hits, 48 runs and seven errors.
DEFINING LIFE
March 29, 1998
To the editor: This is in response to the letter sent in by Mr. Don Marquis in response to the March 12 Journal-World story concerning an effort in the Kansas House to pass a resolution forcing the attorney general “to file a lawsuit challenging Kansas abortion law and assert that life begins at conception.”
FOUR FEMALE MUSICIANS MIX IT UP WHEN THEY TAKE THE STAGE
March 29, 1998
The Uptown String Quartet is unique. No, it’s not that they are women or their devotion to the musical heritage of African Americans. What’s most noteworthy about these string players is that their repertoire includes original works as well as the classics of jazz, blues, ragtime, spirituals and R&B.
NED KEHDE COLUMN
March 29, 1998
Up until March 8 it was the winter that wasn’t, and to that point a few die-hard bass fishermen hereabouts were smugly enjoying the best winter fishing in recorded history. Then a vast storm rumbled across the nation, initially bringing wind and rain to Kansas. That was followed by snow, ice, frigid temperatures and more wind.
SPRING POW WOW SCHEDULED FOR APRIL 11
March 29, 1998
The eighth annual Spring Pow Wow, sponsored by the Kansas University Native American Student Assn. and Student Senate, will be April 11 at Anschutz Pavilion on the KU campus. Events will begin with gourd dancing from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The grand entry will be 6:30 p.m.
JAPANESE SAVINGS HEADING TO U.S.
March 29, 1998
The influx is likely to keep U.S. interest rates down and equity prices up — and to increase opportunities to make money in Japan.
S COMPLETE GAME.
March 29, 1998
It was Opposite Day on Saturday at Jayhawk Field. Kansas University’s softball team received four runs scored from the last three hitters in its lineup, its freshman pitcher pitched like a veteran and No. 23-ranked Texas Tech committed three errors while losing the second game of a doubleheader, 5-0.
COMMISSION NOTES
March 29, 1998
The speed study for Folks and Peterson roads began after residents living in the area complained to county officials in September about excessive speeds and growing traffic on the roads, which some believed were caused by the opening of Free State High School last fall. Peterson Road currently is marked for 40 miles per hour, while Folks Road has no postings.
MAYER COLUMN
March 29, 1998
Women’s college basketball has come a long way along the road to public acceptance and appreciation, but one series of NCAA tournament promotions this year does not aid that cause. I’m referring to the ESPN spots featuring strident, abrasive actress-comedian Sandra Bernhardt babbling on about who-knows-what while in several instances wearing a Tennessee jersey. Anyone know what she’s trying to get across?