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Archive for Sunday, January 3, 1993

All stories

BRIAN WILKERSON
January 3, 1993
Local dentist Brian Wilkerson says he learned plenty in school about taking care of teeth but little about business. So Wilkerson, 33, taught himself the ins and outs of investing. “I started getting my hands on everything I could,” he says. That includes a daily reading of the Wall Street Journal and watching CNBC’s “Market Wrap,” which he tapes every day at 3 p.m.
JOHN SCHOTT
January 3, 1993
The 20 years that John Schott, 45, has been buying stocks have taught him the value of buy-and-hold investing. A self-decribed market “fundamentalist,” Schott finds his payoff in picking stocks carefully and then committing to long-term ownership.
OLD BOOKS FIND NEW HOME
January 3, 1993
Old Philip Ernst Sr. probably would be pleased. His family, led by grandson Rod Ernst, recently donated the Lawrence Turnverein’s library to Kansas University’s Max Kade Center for German-American Studies. The late Philip Ernst Sr. was active in the Lawrence Turnverein, an organization for early German settlers, and he purchased the group’s Turn Hall, 900 R.I., when it disbanded in the 1930s. Along with the property came the buildings’ contents, which included the library books.
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
January 3, 1993
To the editor: Like Hilda Enoch, I too believe Lawrence needs public transportation. Without affordable transportation, maybe some stay on welfare rather than working at a low wage. A town the size of Lawrence, Kansas, shouldn’t “shut down” when the students are gone.
OUTRAGED BY PARDONS
January 3, 1993
To the editor: Your editorial of Dec. 26, 1992, titled “Pardons Justified” is destructive of one of the basic principles upon which the government of this country stands. Although you give lip service to the principle that no man is above the law, you condone it, and then you tell us to forget about it and move on to something else.
DOROTHY COLLISTER
January 3, 1993
Dorothy Collister is a bargain hunter whose investment objectives send her shopping for stocks that have solid histories of paying dividends. “It used to be that I set my goal at 4 percent (return) but lately I’ve lowered it to 2 percent,” she says noting that she has a liking for blue chips and utility stocks. “I seldom go for a stock that pays nothing.”
FABLED HARLEM RELEASES STILL FRESH TODAY
January 3, 1993
One of the more significant recording operations spawned by music-hungry audiences during World War II was the Apollo label. Established by the owners of Harlem’s fabled Rainbow Music Shop, and therefore in direct touch with its primarily black audience, the thriving “indie” brought an array of compelling jazz, blues and gospel artists before its microphones. Though ceasing operations in 1962, Apollo left an archive brimming with goodies. Now, thanks to Delmark, Apollo’s close-to-the-bone vibrations are being reissued with immaculately digitized restorations and spanking-new liner notes by some of the jazz world’s top commentators.
BARBARA BISHOP
January 3, 1993
Barbara Bishop says she and her husband Ken still have the General Motors stock her father gave them as a wedding present. That’s not surprising, given Bishop’s approach to the stock market. “We are investors rather than speculators,” the Lawrence homemaker says.
FOR THE RECORD
January 3, 1993
Law enforcement report Police reports
FIRE CALLS
January 3, 1993
Lawrence firefighters: Investigated a false alarm at 7:43 a.m. Thursday at 2300 Iowa. The alarm was a system malfunction.
GARY KIRK WRAY
January 3, 1993
Funeral services for Gary Kirk Wray, 30, Lawrence, will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at the United Methodist Church, Overbrook, with the Rev. Willard Braker officiating. Burial will be in Overbrook Cemetery. Mr. Wray died Friday, Jan. 1, 1993, in Clay Center.
CHARLES ALLEN KLOPP
January 3, 1993
Services for Charles Allen Klopp, 63, Parkville, Mo., are pending. Mr. Klopp died Friday, Jan. 1, 1993, in St. Luke’s Hospital, Kansas City, Mo. He was born Oct. 27, 1929, in Elgin, Ill., the son of Vernon and Rose Klopp.
CAUTIOUS OPTIMISM GREETS TRADE TREATY
January 3, 1993
1993 could open a new era of free trade in North America with a historic trade agreement designed to smash tariff and quota barriers between the United States, Canada and Mexico and create a pool of consumers comparable to the European Community’s. The North American Free Trade Agreement could lead to more sales of Kansas grain and cattle to Mexico and cheaper fruits and vegetables in Lawrence supermarkets.
S HOME WINNING STREAK ENDS WITH LOSS TO CREIGHTON
January 3, 1993
So much for the 20-game home winning streak. So much for momentum heading into the Big Eight season. Both are down the drain for Kansas’ women’s basketball team.
92 FOULED FISHING, HAMPERED HUNTERS
January 3, 1993
When the Queen of England concluded that 1992 had been an “annus horribulus,” a lot of fishermen and hunters around northeastern Kansas knew what she meant. There were many hardscrabble days in ‘92, and crappie fishermen moaned the most.
HOSPITAL REPORT
January 3, 1993
DISMISSALS Amy Heeter and baby girl, Tonganoxie; Maureen Davidson and baby girl, Tonganoxie.
DEVELOPER MAKES NEW PITCH ON PUBLIC GOLF COURSE
January 3, 1993
Developer Jeff Gazaway is presenting yet another pitch to Lawrence city commissioners for building an 18-hole public golf course east of town. Plans already are in place, he said. Financing is available. Construction can begin by the first week of March.
HUMORIST BRINGS TALES TO LAWRENCE
January 3, 1993
Church and school are serious business. So why is Hall Duncan, whose titles include missionary and scholar, chuckling while he relates this item from a church newsletter: “Would all young mothers, or those who are trying to be, see the pastor at 10 o’clock in the morning?”
DANGEROUS LIAISONS? FACULTY-STUDENT DATING A THORNY ISSUE IN ACADEMIA
January 3, 1993
No rule at Kansas University prohibits romantic or sexual relationships among faculty and students, but, in the opinion of higher education officials, liaisons that move from classroom to bedroom jeopardize the teaching process. Stanley Koplik, executive director of the Kansas Board of Regents, which has jurisdiction over KU, said student-faculty dating trespasses on the principal relationship among students and faculty teaching.
CORRECTION
January 3, 1993
Because of incorrect information given to the Journal-World, an account of an accident in Thursday’s J-W contained errors. A Kansas Highway Patrol dispatcher said on Saturday night that the accident happened Wednesday 1.2 miles south of Lecompton on Douglas County Road 1029. The dispatcher said a northbound pickup driven by Leslie Schmidt, 30, Perry, hit a patch of ice and entered the southbound lane, where it collided head-on with a pickup driven by Royall Hoffer, 23, no address listed.
ROSS POINTS FINGER AT ANEMIC OFFENSE
January 3, 1993
There’s a prevailing feeling of discontent among Kansas City’s defensive players, and Kevin Ross is more than happy to deliver the message. “They say defense wins championships, but scoring points doesn’t hurt,” said Ross, a Chiefs’ cornerback, after KC’s 17-0 playoff loss to San Diego on Saturday at Jack Murphy Stadium.
CHIEFS ELIMINATED, 17-0
January 3, 1993
With one flash of his backside, Marion Butts gave San Diego the kick in the pants it needed to send Kansas City bouncing out of the NFL playoffs. Butts’ 54-yard touchdown run was the first score in the Chargers’ 17-0 victory over the Chiefs on Saturday before 58,278 fans at rain-slick Jack Murphy Stadium.
FOR THE RECORD
January 3, 1993
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
HARRISON SERVICES
January 3, 1993
Services for Glenn A. Harrison, 74, Baldwin, have been rescheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday at Lamb-Roberts Funeral Home here with Ray M. Jones officiating. Mr. Harrison died Wednesday, Dec. 30, at Lawrence.
S DISMISSAL HEARING
January 3, 1993
The dating game played by U.S. college students and faculty has been brought into focus at Kansas University during a dismissal hearing for a law professor. Since August, Emil Tonkovich has fought charges brought by KU Chancellor Gene Budig that Tonkovich should be fired for violating the Faculty Code of Conduct.
DENNIS KATZFEY
January 3, 1993
Of the five investors participating in the Journal-World’s stock challenge, Dennis Katzfey, a local home builder, is the most active trader in his own portfolio. Katzfey, 39, who has been investing in the stock market for 2 years, says he buys and sells daily. To gain the knowledge and maintain the confidence such active participation in the market requires, Katzfey immerses himself in it. The television in his office is tuned to CNBC while the market is open to keep the “ticker tape” running across the bottom of the screen.
MAIL DELIVERY FALLS VICTIM TO ICE
January 3, 1993
It may well be that rain, hail, sleet, snow or gloom of night won’t keep postal workers from their appointed rounds. But ice-glazed streets and sidewalks are another matter they led Lawrence Postmaster Bill Reynolds to cancel most home mail delivery on Saturday.
NEBRASKANS LIKELY BORED WITH MIAMI
January 3, 1993
It once was said Nebraska’s rabid football fans would follow their beloved Cornhuskers en masse anywhere…probably even to the moon. Now it appears those fervent Nebraska followers would have been more postseason-conscious if the Huskers had played in the Lunar Bowl instead of the Orange Bowl.
BROKERS
January 3, 1993
Interest rates will stay low in 1993, allowing the stock market to continue as an attractive alternative to bank deposits, say local stock brokers. “I don’t expect interest rates to go up,” said Garth Terlizzi of LPL Financial Services. “As a result, stocks are going to be a good place to have money.”
INTRUSIVENESS MAY BE LEGACY OF NEW CRIME REPORTS
January 3, 1993
Beginning Friday, Lawrence police may be delving deeper into the personal lives of crime victims than ever before. Under new crime reporting guidelines mandated by the Legislature, police must determine whether any crime reported to the department is motivated by hate or bias. As part of that requirement, police may have to press harder about victims’ religious affiliations or sexual preferences.
SCHOOL BOARD RACE LACKS CANDIDATES
January 3, 1993
Seven people are considering it. But so far, only one person has committed himself to running for one of the three Lawrence school board positions up for grabs in the spring elections.
TROUBLED COUNTERPARTS
January 3, 1993
Our namesake in Massachusetts would be glad to trade at least one of its problems for ours, and get back to more flexible and free-wheeling times. After months of battling drug dealers, police in Lawrence, Mass., have sealed off one neighborhood to keep “customers” from making illegal and potentially deadly purchases. Officers have set up a roadblock and put checkpoints around the neighborhood. Imagine what that must be like at holiday-time for the law-abiding people who live in the region, their friends and relatives who might want to visit them, and for impressionable children who don’t really need this kind of bad experience.
MASTERS PACK MULVANE
January 3, 1993
Soaking in the William I. Koch Collection at the Mulvane Art Museum is like rambling through a field of white poppies littered with wild tiger lilies. Brilliant signature works by American and European masters Hopper, Renoir, Remington, Monet and Cezanne snap out at the viewer from between comparatively lesser works by artists of the same caliber.