Archive for Saturday, November 2, 1991

All stories

S THE MOTIVE?
November 2, 1991
To the editor: Motives of the city’s handling of a case dealing with preserving its own legacy involving the historic English Lutheran Church at 1040 N.H. have been questionable. In light of recent local support to turn back mall development in the downtown area, preservation of the unique character of Lawrence was seen as vital to the success and heritage of our community.
FALLOUT FROM THE PROCESS
November 2, 1991
We still hear a great deal of talk and analysis about the Supreme Court confirmation process for Clarence Thomas, and the turmoil caused by the Anita Hill episode. When something is that prominent on the immediate scene, there is a tendency to believe it will have great impact at the polls. We’ll see.
MORE ODD BEDFELLOWS
November 2, 1991
Another bizarre development from recent changes in Europe is the fact that France and Germany, legendary enemies with bitter backgrounds, are working to develop a European army corps. The two nations have repeatedly called for a European Community defense policy as economic and political integration continues to spread across the continent. Under the Franco-German plan, a joint military corps of 70,000 to 100,000 men would be located in Strasbourg.
NASA GRANTS AID AVIATION PROGRAMS
November 2, 1991
Kansas University professor David Downing wants the $1 million Kansas Space Grant Consortium to reach new heights. “This is a real opportunity for Kansas,” said Downing, consortium director and chair of KU’s aerospace engineering department. “Although it’s focused on aviation and space, we’re really talking about science and mathematics education for the state.”
DANCER OFFERS REVEALING LOOK AT HER SPIRITUALITY
November 2, 1991
CHARLEY M. GIENAU
November 2, 1991
Services are pending for Charley M. Gienau, 67, Eudora. Mr. Gienau died Friday, Nov. 1, 1991, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
LAWRENCE HIGH CHILLS LEAVENWORTH
November 2, 1991
The Great Equalizer turned into the Great Polarizer on Friday night at Haskell Stadium. Third-ranked Lawrence High, seemingly unaffected by the snow-covered field, brutal cold and biting wind, took advantage of four Leavenworth fumbles and an interception as the Lions won their 33rd straight district football game, 28-0, over the Pioneers in both teams’ regular-season finale.
OFFERS
November 2, 1991
Most recruiters at a job fair Friday at Haskell Indian Junior College said they are experiencing cutbacks at their agencies as a result of the nation’s uncertain economy. Sally Davila, personnel management specialist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s office in Kansas City, Mo., said, “It seems like all agencies are being downsized.”
RUSSIAN PLAYERS COMING AFTER ALL
November 2, 1991
The Russians are coming, but they won’t arrive in time for a basketball game tonight, according to the latest word from the Meeting For Peace Foundation. There will be a game, though, with Kansas University basketball alumni staging an intrasquad contest at 7:30 tonight at Allen Fieldhouse. The organization had scheduled the “Russia-Kansas All-Star Classic,” a game pitting former KU players against former Soviet Olympic stars. However, problems with tickets on the Soviet government-run Aeroflot airline found the Soviet players bumped off their flight in favor of travelers paying with dollars instead of rubles, game organizers said.
LAWSUIT SEEKS SKATING DAMAGES
November 2, 1991
A Lawrence man has filed a lawsuit against a Lawrence skating rink in connection with an injury allegedly suffered at the rink last year. Dennis Grammer filed the lawsuit claiming Fantasyland, 3210 Iowa, was negligent “in not keeping the skating floor in good and safe condition and in allowing the skating floor to become and remain rough and hazardous.” He is seeking damages in excess of $50,000.
CITY COMMISSIONERS FIND COMMON GOALS
November 2, 1991
Lawrence city commissioners returned to the drawing board at this year’s goal-setting retreat, and they took some crayons with them. The five commissioners collaborated on a map of Lawrence, drawn with Crayolas on construction paper, as it could appear in the year 2011.
ESTHER D. KLIEWER
November 2, 1991
Services for Esther Dorothea Kliewer, 90, Topeka, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at First Congregational Church in Topeka. Burial will be in Mount Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Kliewer died Thursday, Oct. 31, 1991, at a Topeka nursing home.
NIGERIAN SEES THREAT IN RELIGIOUS STRIFE
November 2, 1991
Religious zealotry threatens the future of Nigeria and efforts to return the country to civilian rule, Nigeria’s ambassador to the United Nations said Friday. “Religion has replaced ethnicity as the driving force of Nigeria’s political direction,” said Ibrahim Gambari in a speech at Kansas University.
LIONS NOT FOILED BY ICY CONDITIONS
November 2, 1991
It was a night better suited to huddling by the fireplace than playing football. Yet Lawrence High’s football players insist they didn’t mind braving the outdoors and toiling in near-zero wind chill during Friday’s 28-0 win over Leavenworth at Haskell Stadium.
COLD TEMPERATURE RECORD BROKEN
November 2, 1991
The temperature in Lawrence hit a record low Friday when it dipped to 22 degrees. Until Friday, the lowest recorded temperature for Nov. 1 had been 24 degrees, a record set in 1911. The record low temperature for Nov. 2 also occurred in 1911. That low was 15 degrees. The temperature today is expected to rise to 25 degrees and then sink to 10 degrees tonight.
WISHBONE SPARKS TONGIE
November 2, 1991
Perry-Lecompton choked on a bone Friday night. Tonganoxie’s wishbone. The Chieftains’ three-pronged rushing attack ate up the clock, as well as the Kaws, and propelled Tonganoxie to a 14-0 high school Class 4A distict football win at Beatty Field.
FOR THE RECORD
November 2, 1991
District court Criminal case proceedings Aaron Starkebaum, 20, Carbondale, recently was sentenced to one year imprisonment, but was granted two years probation after pleading guilty earlier this month to one misdemeanor count of theft. Starkebaum orginally was charged with felony theft, but under the terms of an amended complaint the theft charge was reduced to a misdemeanor. The charge stems from a July incident when Starkebaum allegedly took two Suzuki all-terrain vehicles from the parking lot of a West Lawrence mobile home court.
Lions not foiled by icy conditions
November 2, 1991
It was a night better suited to huddling by the fireplace than playing football. Yet Lawrence High’s football players insist they didn’t mind braving the outdoors and toiling in near-zero wind chill during Friday’s 28-0 win over Leavenworth at Haskell Stadium.
Lawrence High chills Leavenworth
November 2, 1991
The Great Equalizer turned into the Great Polarizer on Friday night at Haskell Stadium. Third-ranked Lawrence High, seemingly unaffected by the snow-covered field, brutal cold and biting wind, took advantage of four Leavenworth fumbles and an interception as the Lions won their 33rd straight district football game, 28-0, over the Pioneers in both teams’ regular-season finale.
WETLANDS GRANT HELPS KEEP IT WET
November 2, 1991
Roger Boyd wants to keep the Baker Wetlands wet. And efforts to counter the effects that flood control measures have had on the wetlands recently got a helping hand.
As Lions, they never expected they’d lose
November 2, 1991
Ask former Lawrence High football players what they think of when they recall their playing days, and they’ll give the same answer different ways.
SATURDAY COLUMN
November 2, 1991
Imagination, foresight and a willingness to consider new ideas are important in most every effort. The consequences of living in the past, complacency and an unwillingness to change can be dangerous, if not disastrous. This is true in business, education, banking, farming and/or any other venture. One of the challenges facing Lawrence residents these days is how to plan for a steady increase in the number of students in grades kindergarten through high school. In recent years the “school issue” has triggered hundreds of meetings and countless hours of debate and study by school board members and those interested in education.
MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS
November 2, 1991
To the editor: The month of October was Mental Illness Awareness Month. Just two years ago, our state Legislature passed a “Mental Health Reform Act” that was long on silver-lined words and moth-filled purses. Two separate studies had estimated costs for true reform at between $20 million and $50 million dollars. The state added only slightly over $1 million dollars. The projected state budget for next year has zero dollars budgeted for the continuation of this reform.
HOSPITAL REPORT
November 2, 1991
DISMISSALS Adriane Black, Lawrence; Lisa Peres, Emporia.