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Archive for Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Army Corps wants thorough review of dredging impact on Kansas River

January 22, 2013

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Federal officials have extended five sand dredging permits from the Kansas River for one year while a thorough evaluation of potential impacts continues.

Since the extended permits — covering 10 locations — include previous conditions, three dredging locations will cease in May between Eudora and Bowersock Dam in Lawrence because of elevation drops in the riverbed that exceed more than two feet, according to a news release from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The current dredging permits, which expired at the end of 2012, authorized five companies to dredge 2.2 million tons annually from 10 sites. In seeking reauthorization of their permits, the companies had proposed an increase in the tonnage dredged to 3.2 million. The companies applying for reauthorization were Kaw Valley Companies, Holliday Sand & Gravel, Penny's Aggregates, Master's Dredging and Meier's Ready Mix.

The dredging companies have hired the environmental consulting firm Habitat Architects to prepare a report, which is expected to be finished by early March, according to the Corps.

Friends of the Kaw, a conservation group that works on protecting the Kansas River, applauded the Corps' decision to stop three dredging locations but expressed concern over allowing the seven other locations to continue operating.

"We are pleased that the Corps, due to unacceptable bed degradation is moving three of 10 dredge operations off the river," said Laura Calwell, Kansas Riverkeeper for Friends of the Kaw. "We are also grateful that they are making such efforts to keep the public updated. Still, we think the Corps has plenty of scientific evidence to cease all dredging on the Kaw, right now."

Comments

RaynRavyn 1 year, 11 months ago

I'm not an enviromental expert, but from the amound of sand vs. the amount of moving water I can see in a lot of areas of the river, dredging is a GREAT thing. There are places, especially near Lecompton, that I think I could pi... urinate, a stronger flow than the river has... Same thing is happening in Perry lake. It silts in to just a very narrow channel.

Claire Williams 1 year, 11 months ago

We have been under a drought for almost 2 years. Water levels are very low, exposing sandbars that are normally under water by a considerable margin. There isn't more sand than there was before. There is just less water.

Dredging isn't a solution to the problem; it just causes it's own problems of stirring up silt, contaminants and other things, making the turbidity of the water worsen. That is really bad for fish and wildlife populations.

bearded_gnome 1 year, 11 months ago

"We are pleased that the Corps, due to unacceptable bed degradation is moving three of 10 dredge operations off the river," said Laura Calwell, Kansas Riverkeeper for Friends of the Kaw. "We are also grateful that they are making such efforts to keep the public updated. Still, we think the Corps has plenty of scientific evidence to cease all dredging on the Kaw, right now."

---and where would sand come from then? or do they care?

dinoman 1 year, 11 months ago

ok sooo open pit mining is ok... is that what im getting.... because i believe there were a LOT of open pit mining in southern ks turn of the century that cause a lot of issues later ... What I wonder is does anybody realize that the "sand " replenished it self in the river... and it has done it for thousands of years..or the river will silt up and then change course and can we realy afford that...I mean just look at all the repair that the Corps has done down stream from the dams in Lawrence... just to make the river flow better.. yea moving a couple of feet of sand will make the water dirty for a while... but when its gone you have a great deeper river not some gaping hole in the ground that takes the state money to fill back in when the company cant affored to fill it in... just look in the past and there is your answer. google open pit mining is that a better answer...REALLY

Claire Williams 1 year, 11 months ago

I didn't say it was a better answer, just answering gnome's question about where the sand would likely come from.

bearded_gnome 1 year, 11 months ago

just_ducky
Claire Williams 1 hour, 33 minutes ago

I didn't say it was a better answer, just answering gnome's question about where the sand would likely come from.

---EXACTLY!
seems like river dredging is the best alternative.

once again we see the environuts who care nothing for human misery, cost, etc., as they push their radical environmental agenda.
same people oppose open pit sand mining.

suppose they think we should collect the little grains of sand as they fall in drops of rain and distill them, lol.

Claire Williams 1 year, 11 months ago

You do realize that Lawrence and other communities get their drinking water from the Kaw, right? Dredging affects the quality of that water. Heavy metals, pesticides, and all manner of nasty things settle to the streambed, and dredging disperses all of them into the water again.

This isn't just an issue about protecting recreation or wildlife on the stream.

So much for not caring about human misery.... (misery, really? Because a concrete plant might have to get its sand elsewhere? Oh, the horror!)

bearded_gnome 1 year, 11 months ago

Ducky, you do realize that we do have a water treatment plant on the intake side, where water is taken from the river to supply the city, right? are they insufficient to the task of dealing with these threats?

please stop catastrophizing

bearded_gnome 1 year, 11 months ago

Thank you Ducky for so vividly displaying the very turbid thinking of the environmental crazies.

So much for not caring about human misery.... (misery, really? Because a concrete plant might have to get its sand elsewhere? Oh, the horror!)

---first, sand also is important for street safety in icey conditions but of course since you people view humans as a virus on the planet, if some die in traffic accidents on ice, that just helps the environment.

second, about concrete, so you are in deed antijob, anticapitalism. just what do you think happens when that concrete becomes dramatically more expensive to produce? maybe the concrete plant shuts down, oops people lose their jobs. and various building and road work grinds to a halt, again jobs get stopped.

and just what are the health effects of poverty and joblessness? they're quite serious.

yes, human misery. concrete is important in our world and our economy.

it even helps to prevent erosion, and otherwise prevent harm from water. but if it's too costly, concrete won't be there.

so, you're saying it's really okay to just casually shut down concrete production.

and, otherwise, shut down access to sand.

meanwhile, the kaw rolls on, and as it goes, it seems to be depositing more sand as it rolls along.

bearded_gnome 1 year, 11 months ago

very turbid thinking indeed: oh we just can't dredge the Kaw!

and yet getting sand from open pit is indeed worse.

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