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Archive for Monday, March 19, 2012

Kansas House passes $14B budget; cuts $600M

March 19, 2012, 1:45 p.m. Updated March 19, 2012, 3:07 p.m.

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— The Kansas House on Monday overwhelmingly approved a $14.1 billion state budget that cuts overall spending by about $600 million, or 4 percent.

House members voted 87-36 on the bill containing the spending plan for the fiscal year that begins July 1. The measure now moves to the Senate, which is working out its version of the budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1.

Under the House-approved bill, the House would spend $600 million less than in the current year but expand expenditures by the Legislature by $1 million.

The House legislation also contains a provision to prohibit state employees from being involved in abortions, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. The ban, championed in the House by Rep. Joe Patton, R-Topeka, includes University of Kansas Medical Center physicians-in-training.

Patton's amendment has raised concern at KUMC that education accreditation could be jeopardized by the limitation.

House members also added $29 million to help K-12 public schools deal with higher-than-expected student enrollment. A House floor amendment restored the school aid by taking $25 million from a Kansas Department of Transportation's highway program.

Rep. Don Hineman, R-Dighton, who spoke for a bipartisan group of 10 House members, said they considered the budget bill flawed but that they would vote for it.

"We shouldn't have to choose between adequately funding K-12 and fully supporting KDOT's T-Works," he said.

The House bill also provided to community mental health centers $5 million more than the $10 million requested by Brownback and retained a ban enacted last fall by the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services to deny food stamp benefits to some U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants. The Brownback administration changed state policy on the food stamp program to include in eligibility calculations the income of all adults, including undocumented workers.

The measure pushed some families above the maximum monthly net income level to receive the government benefit.

Comments

Crazy_Larry 2 years ago

"Governor, I am experiencing mid-cycle cramping. Is this a punishment from god for not getting pregnant this month?"

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2012/03/21/149056892/women-continue-to-fill-rick-perrys-facebook-wall-with-mock-questions?ft=1&f=

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Crazy_Larry 2 years ago

If you are a corporate "person" the Republicans want government to get out of your life, but if you are a person "person" they are all about controlling every aspect of your life.

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Crazy_Larry 2 years ago

If I were a woman, I'd incorporate my uterus. Maybe then the republicans wouldn't be so interested in regulating it.

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WilburNether 2 years, 1 month ago

It's always entertaining to watch the little piggies in the People's Republic of Lawrence squeal when it appears that lower quantities of other people's money will be poured into the public trough at which they feed.

Squeal, piggies, squeal!

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JM Andy 2 years, 1 month ago

And I'll be leaving Kansas very soon, to secure a decent education for my daughter and to ensure our civil rights remain intact. Welcome to 1950...er Kansas...

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Michael LoBurgio 2 years, 1 month ago

The House 2013 budget puts no new money per child into Kansas public schools. Not providing some kind of cost of living increase for schools puts pressure on local school boards to raise property taxes to cover the cost of inflation and improving schools.

Public schools have endured more than their fair share of budget cuts over the last few years.

Last year alone, Gov. Brownback asked for a $104 million cut to public schools - the largest cut to public schools - the largest cut to public education in Kansas history.

In total, public education has been cut nearly $270 million since fiscal year 2009.

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Michael LoBurgio 2 years, 1 month ago

House Republican 2013 fiscal year budget

Here are some funding areas that were recommended for cuts in the House 2013 budget:

· Community Health Centers were cut $1.8 million for screenings for non-Medicaid patients. Right now, even if you are not Medicaid eligible, you can go to a local community mental health center and talk to someone for an initial screening. Now those people will be turned away.

· Family Centered Systems of Care was eliminated. This provides mental health services for families with children with serious emotional disturbances.

· Family Preservation Reduction was cut by $654,000. This program helps families stay together and cuts about 600 families from the program.

· Children’s Initiatives Funds were cut about $15 million. This includes a number of early childhood education programs.

· $157,000 was cut from Addiction and Prevention Services grants, cutting services to about 100 Kansans.

· Cut foster care contract rates by $2.3 million and foster care reimbursement rates by $3.4 million.

· Cut child support enforcement contracts by $1.4 million.

· Cut funding by $2.1 million for children over the age of 13 in SRS custody. This will mean more kids over the age of 13 who were in foster care due to out-of-control behavior, truancy, overwhelmed parents, etc., will not be covered. They will have to stay at home.

· Cut support for Centers for Independent Living by 18%. This supports Kansans with developmental disabilities.

· Reduce foster parent training by 13 percent or $111,000.

· State employees get no raises and their longevity pay (for employees with 10 years or more service) is reduced.

· The budget had a provision that would not allow new patients into KNI. Rep Annie Kuether made an amendment to keep the doors open for new patients and it passed.

· In asking for your priorities in spending, you told me that your number one priority was to put some money back into K12 education.

The House 2013 budget puts no new money per child into Kansas public schools. Not providing some kind of cost of living increase for schools puts pressure on local school boards to raise property taxes to cover the cost of inflation and improving schools.

Public schools have endured more than their fair share of budget cuts over the last few years.

Last year alone, Gov. Brownback asked for a $104 million cut to public schools - the largest cut to public schools - the largest cut to public education in Kansas history.

In total, public education has been cut nearly $270 million since fiscal year 2009.

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question4u 2 years, 1 month ago

It's hardly worth reporting this information, since most of what the clowns in the Kansas House have done will be rejected by the adults in the Senate anyway. It's the same every year. We can expect to see Mike O'Neal with a bloated red face, indignant over the fact that House extremism seems foolish to all those in the Senate who possess foresight and a conscience.

It's the principal reason that we have a bicameral legislature. The House can be stuffed with Anthony Browns, Virgil Pecks, and Mickey Mouses, but Senate seats are harder to come by. It's not surprising that state senators tend to be brighter. In general, they actually read bills before voting for them.

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Elaine Elliott 2 years, 1 month ago

http://www.kslegislature.org/li/b2011_12/measures/documents/hb2598_00_0000.pdf

Here is a link to the bill. It's pretty sad. Women are having rights taking away from them.

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sierraclub 2 years, 1 month ago

Hey, whinners, the borders are open!!!!!

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Enlightenment 2 years, 1 month ago

"The House legislation also contains a provision to prohibit state employees from being involved in abortions."

Doesn't that read as if state workers are not allowed to have abortions?

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Enlightenment 2 years, 1 month ago

"The House legislation also contains a provision to prohibit state employees from being involved in abortions."

Why don't they just say you must right winged, religious, and anti-choice to work for the state.

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ksjayhawk74 2 years, 1 month ago

Good job Kansas House. Letting children who are citizens go hungry if their parents are illegal takes a lot of cojones. It's exactly what Jesus would, especially if he knew how much money the State of Kansas is saving by letting these kids go hungry.

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