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Archive for Friday, September 9, 2011

Reorganization to create 4 new vice provost positions at KU

September 9, 2011

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Kansas University has announced a reorganization that will abolish the Office of the Vice Provost for Student Success and will align that office’s functions under four new vice provost positions.

Gavin Young, a KU spokesman, said no one would be laid off with the new changes.

Marlesa Roney, who had been serving as vice provost for student success making $186,000, will become a professor of practice in the School of Education. Her position will not be replaced.

At least three other positions will be unfilled as a result of the changes: an associate vice provost for academic and student life, an assistant vice provost position and the business manager for the provost’s office.

The four new vice provost positions are: a vice provost for student affairs, a vice provost for enrollment management, a vice provost for diversity and equity, and a future vice provost for undergraduate education. Fred Rodriguez already has been named as vice provost for diversity and equity.

Several leadership changes have been announced:

• Matt Melvin, who had been working as an associate vice provost, will become the new vice provost for enrollment management. His salary will increase from $152,000 to $175,000.

• Kathryn Nemeth Tuttle, who had been an assistant vice provost, will become a special adviser to the provost, joining Chris Haufler. Her salary will increase from $88,889 to $130,000. Those two positions will eventually be replaced by a vice provost for undergraduate education, which Young said could happen a year from now.

• Tammara Durham, who had been an associate vice provost, will serve as interim vice provost for student affairs. A search to find a permanent replacement will occur later. Her salary will increase from $112,000 to $130,000.

Young said no one else would receive a salary increase based on the reorganizations announced Friday.

Comments

Jean Robart 3 years, 3 months ago

huh--more bureaucracy, and the lemmings get laid off or organized out

Commentor 3 years, 3 months ago

The highest paid state workers are those in universities. They have been held harmless by the state budget cuts, frozen salaries, reduced pensions and increased worker costs of health insurance. WHY? It's not fair, and not right. The universities are top-heavy with highly paid administrators who add no value to the learning experience in the classroom.

question4u 3 years, 3 months ago

University workers have had "frozen salaries" for three years. How have they been "held harmless" "by frozen salaries"?

The contributions to their health insurance have gone up over those same three years. How have they been "held harmless" "by... increased worker costs of health insurance"?

Staff will be affected by reduced pensions, but faculty aren't even eligible for pensions. They already have the less attractive 401k plan that will replace KPERS. How much sense does it make to say that they have been "held harmless" in that case?

Administrators add no value to the classroom in the same way that Boeing CEOs add no value to designing or manufacturing of aircraft. Who in their right mind really thinks that any multimillion dollar budget can manage itself? Who in their right mind would want that multi-million dollar budget managed by people hired at a below competitive salaries? Do tax payers really want state funds at universities to be administered by people who are being paid well below administrators who handle comparable sums of money in private corporations?

crimsonlaugh 3 years, 3 months ago

Late to the game on this article but salaraies have not been frozen. For some (including some advisors) it has, but many have definitely been getting raises.

Commentor 3 years, 3 months ago

The highest paid state workers are those in universities. They have been held harmless by the state budget cuts, frozen salaries, reduced pensions and increased worker costs of health insurance. WHY? It's not fair, and not right. The universities are top-heavy with highly paid administrators who add no value to the learning experience in the classroom.

gl0ck0wn3r 3 years, 3 months ago

What a fantastic idea. KU needs more provosts about as much as a five-assed monkey needs another ass.

Grump 3 years, 3 months ago

Wow! Does the KU administration and Regents really not see the political reality KU is facing? The Legislature and Brownback would love to sell it off or change it to the "Lawrence Bible College."

heath 3 years, 3 months ago

Did any of you actually read the article or just the headline? Four positions are becoming "unfilled" and 4 new positions are being created. That is a net increase of zero. KU is restructuring not adding position.

Phillbert 3 years, 3 months ago

And they're cutting a $186,000 a year position. Sounds like a net savings to me.

yourworstnightmare 3 years, 3 months ago

Jealous of salaries at KU? You had as much a chance as anyone at KU in excelling in your studies, working your butts off for 10 years for little or no money, and working your way through the university ranks.

I agree that KU has too many administrators that are paid too much, but that's not what the folks on this site are complaining about. It is about high salaries at KU overall.

Instead of working hard in school and succeeding, these folks likely didn't take their studies serious and didn't work hard in high school. They likely got entry level jobs in trades or sales, and now, after 20 years post-high school, are making less money than KU employees.

What happened to the idea that success and hard work should be rewarded?

Instead of being jealous, you should admire people at KU for their hard work and success.

oakfarm 3 years, 3 months ago

Show me the hard work and success and I will admire it. For now, all I see are appointments, promotions and raises. There was no mention of hard work or success in the article.

yourworstnightmare 3 years, 3 months ago

How do you think these people got in a position for these? Do you think it was random? Luck? No, appointments, promotions, and raises are merit based. Have you never had a professional job?

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