Advertisement

Archive for Saturday, November 19, 2011

House says no to mandating balanced federal budget

November 19, 2011

Advertisement

— Rejecting the idea Congress can’t control its spending impulses, the House turned back a Republican proposal Friday to amend the Constitution to dam the rising flood of federal red ink. Democrats — and a few GOP lawmakers — said damage from the balanced-budget mandate would outweigh any benefits.

The first House vote in 16 years on making federal deficits unconstitutional came as the separate bipartisan “supercommittee” appeared to be sputtering in its attempt to find at least $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions to head off major automatic cuts. The lead Republican on that panel said members were “painfully, painfully aware” of its Wednesday deadline for action and would work through the weekend.

The House voted 261-165 in favor of the measure to require annual balanced budgets, but that was 23 short of the two-thirds majority needed to advance a constitutional amendment.

Democrats overwhelmingly opposed the proposal, arguing that such a requirement would force Congress to make devastating cuts to social programs.

Most Republicans favored the measure, but there were prominent exceptions.

Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the party’s point man on budgetary matters, agreed with GOP colleagues that “spending is the problem.” But he added that “this version of the balanced budget amendment makes it more likely taxes will be raised, government will grow and economic freedom will be diminished.”

Likewise, Rules Committee Chairman David Dreier, R-Calif., said lawmakers should be able to find common ground without changing the Constitution, and he expressed concern that lawsuits filed if Congress failed to balance the budget could result in courts making decisions on cutting spending or raising taxes.

In all, 235 Republicans and 25 Democrats voted for the amendment, four Republicans and 161 Democrats opposed it. The other two Republicans voting no were Justin Amash of Michigan and Louie Gohmert of Texas.

Later in the day, the top Republican on the deficit-reduction supercommittee indicated no deal was near but efforts would continue through the last weekend before Wednesday’s deadline.

“We are painfully, painfully aware of the deadline that is staring us in the face,” said Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas. “When we have something more to report, we will report.”

With the national debt now topping $15 trillion and the deficit for the just-ended fiscal year passing $1 trillion, supporters of the constitutional amendment declared it the only way to stop out-of-control spending. The government now must borrow 36 cents for every dollar it spends.

“It is our last line of defense against Congress’ unending desire to overspend and overtax,” Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, said as the House debated the measure.

But Democratic leaders worked aggressively to defeat it, saying that such a requirement could force Congress to cut billions from social programs during times of economic downturn and that disputes over what to cut could result in Congress ceding its power of the purse to the courts.

Comments

Getaroom 3 years, 1 month ago

Oh! Remember, at the insistence of the Tea Party, the reading outloud of the Constitution on the floor as if it were the sacred Holy Bible, and that no one should ever question the intent of the Founding Fathers? The interpretation police front and forward please! Guess it's OK now to switch things around to suit the fundamentalist agenda.

Fundamentalism, the death of rational thought and discourse.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.