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Archive for Sunday, June 26, 2011

Bird watchers flock to Land Trust walk

June 26, 2011

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Casey Wright, Baldwin City, foreground left, and other participants in a Saturday, June 25, Kansas Land Trust Bird Walk, spot an Indigo Bunting in a section of the Baldwin Woods. The walk was through the Earles Easement, a 135-acre wooded area with trails near the southeast corner of Douglas County State Fishing Lake.

Casey Wright, Baldwin City, foreground left, and other participants in a Saturday, June 25, Kansas Land Trust Bird Walk, spot an Indigo Bunting in a section of the Baldwin Woods. The walk was through the Earles Easement, a 135-acre wooded area with trails near the southeast corner of Douglas County State Fishing Lake.

Early morning thunderstorms and an uncomfortably close lightning strike didn’t stop the Kansas Land Trust’s bird walk near Baldwin City from happening Saturday morning.

Steve Roels, KLT member and a graduate student at Kansas University, led participants through the Earles Easement, a 135-acre section of the historic Baldwin Woods. Roels, who has seen almost 900 species of birds, gave bird-watching advice, answered questions and identified birds during the walk. Roels said an array of birds can be seen in Douglas County.

“You do have a good mix of eastern woodland species that reach the edge of their range right here in eastern Kansas,” Roels said.

Tari Hamlin, Lawrence, said she came to see birds she hasn’t seen in her backyard.

“I just wanted to come out and see what it was all about,” she said.

Saturday’s walk was the second KLT hosted in June. Carol Huettner, KLT office manager, said the organization might host another walk in the fall when migratory species return to the state. The walks generally last about two hours and are free to attend.

Comments

Alceste 3 years, 6 months ago

This activity is suspiciously similiar to arts matters. When will Mr. Brownback pounce upon it as a waste of money.....seeking to transfer the work to the "private sector"?

Flap Doodle 3 years, 6 months ago

tweet (in the traditional sense of the word)

Paul Decelles 3 years, 6 months ago

Alceste, Kansas Land Trust is a private non profit already.

http://www.klt.org/index.htm

In fact, I bet Brownback would have to admit this is the type of private action he favors.

BigPrune 3 years, 6 months ago

The modern day fascists are liberal democrats....with their Obama blue shirts, indoctrination of the Obama Youth, the symbolism in his campaign, his glassy eyed followers shouting, "Obama! Obama! Obama!" with arms raised high moving forward in unison everytime his name is mentioned, his total control of the press....the Earth Nazis if you will.

Here's a little ditty to bring it all back.....those poor innocent children! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdPSqL...

Flap Doodle 3 years, 6 months ago

I'm buying Godwin flags by the pallet-load & I'm still running out!

Scott Morgan 3 years, 6 months ago

Alceste, Long long ago the Corp of Engineers seized power over what you and I call lakes and rivers.

Ask yourself Alceste if I were a young full of juice kiddo under 15 how would I access Lake Clinton?

I often joke there will be a sign around Clinton Dam stating.........Do Not Look at Lake.

Clinton Lake should be a beehive of activity, yet only a place for the wealthy to moor boats.

Our young people should be enjoying, for free, the wonders of a lake this size. Why not. Take a peek at the restrictions.

I will always have a heavy heart my generation allowed a group of nincompoops to control our local waters.

Sad thing, those knot heads who tell us we can't do this, can't do that, live on lake or ocean side residences.

We in Kansas have no sack. Table Rock Lake a magnificent example of sharing private and public lands is within a 3 hour drive. Yet we have our mud ponds who can only be used by folks willing to camp in 100 degree weather while launching boats for fishing. Give me Lake of the Ozarks anytime.

BTW............The Corp hates the lake, the most populated and fun lake in the Midwest.

rockchalker52 3 years, 6 months ago

Actually, thuja, I got to thinking about it & one poster did mention the Cedar Crested Brownback species, a migratory specimen whose range extends from Midwest to Coastal areas around Washington DC. The Brownback is noted for taking existing nests & converting them to his liking.

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