Archive for Thursday, June 2, 2011

Kansas will not appeal ruling on Jehovah’s Witness’ liver transplant

June 2, 2011

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— Kansas health officials say the state will drop its objections to allowing a woman to have a bloodless liver transplant in Nebraska.

Mary Stinemetz of Hill City is seeking the transplant because she says her Jehovah's Witness religion forbids blood transfusions. Medicaid will pay the costs of the operation.

Andrew Allison, executive director of The Kansas Health Policy Authority, said Wednesday that it authority will not appeal a court ruling ordering it to grant Stinemetz's request to have the transplant in Nebraska. The authority had objected to having the Kansas Medicaid fund pay for a procedure performed in Nebraska.

The Kansas City Star reports that Stinemetz suffers from primary biliary cirrhosis, which causes the liver to deteriorate. No hospitals in Kansas perform bloodless transplants.

Comments

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 11 months ago

I have a personal prejudice concerning this, and that is that the taxpayers of Kansas are going to have to pay extra for someone's religious opinion that I believe to be baseless. The Jehovah’s Witness' objections to blood are from a single Biblical verse:

Acts.15 [20] but should write to them to abstain from the pollutions of idols and from unchastity and from what is strangled and from blood.

Anyone that is familiar with Jewish dietary law (kashrut) will know that blood is not to be consumed as food in order to remain kosher. To extend this to a life saving procedure is anathema to Jewish halakha, which was commonly adhered to by early Christians at that time. After all, at first Christianity was only a movement within Judaisam itself.

However, many religious movements are based upon sources that cannot be proved one way or another. For instance, the transliteration resulting in the spelling "Jehovah" is laughable to anyone who knows any Hebrew or the history of HaShem.

And for another example, someone claimed to have dug up some plates of solid gold from a hill in New York state in the 1820s that obviously must have weighed hundreds of pounds, but there is no reliable evidence that they ever existed in the first place.

And then, instead of melting them down and becoming the richest man in the world, he founded a major movement that I believe is the largest growing religion in the world today.

Well, maybe the government should stay out of it and go ahead and pay for it, and maybe I should keep my opinions to myself.

After all, I wasn't actually there hundreds of years ago to know for myself anyway.

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 11 months ago

Whoops! Sorry about that double posting!

And, just in case anyone is wondering what happened to the plates of solid gold:

An Angel came and took them away.

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 11 months ago

I have a personal prejudice concerning this, and that is that the taxpayers of Kansas are going to have to pay extra for someone's religious opinion that I believe to be baseless. The Jehovah’s Witness' objections to blood are from a single Biblical verse:

Acts.15 [20] but should write to them to abstain from the pollutions of idols and from unchastity and from what is strangled and from blood.

Anyone that is familiar with Jewish dietary law (kashrut) will know that blood is not to be consumed as food in order to remain kosher. To extend this to a life saving procedure is anathema to Jewish halakha, which was commonly adhered to by early Christians at that time. After all, at first Christianity was only a movement within Judaisam itself.

However, many religious movements are based upon sources that cannot be proved one way or another. For instance, the transliteration resulting in the spelling "Jehovah" is laughable to anyone who knows any Hebrew or the history of HaShem.

And for another example, someone claimed to have dug up some plates of solid gold from a hill in New York state in the 1820s that obviously must have weighed hundreds of pounds, but there is no reliable evidence that they ever existed in the first place.

And then, instead of melting them down and becoming the richest man in the world, he founded a major movement that I believe is the largest growing religion in the world today.

Well, maybe the government should stay out of it and go ahead and pay for it, and maybe I should keep my opinions to myself.

After all, I wasn't actually there hundreds of years ago to know for myself anyway.

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