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Kansas legislature

Kansas Legislature

Document passed around Capitol shows long list of conservative causes

January 12, 2011, 12:23 p.m. Updated January 12, 2011, 4:10 p.m.

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— A document making the rounds in the Capitol indicates some freshmen Republicans in the House are considering big changes to the state.

The three-page letter addressed to the “Freshmen Conservative Class” outlines a long list of proposals.

“We acknowledge that we were elected to act as change-agents and carry out the will of our constituents,” the letter states. “Therefore, we must stay true to these objectives while serving in the body as a whole. While we work as change-agents, we have no desire to act as mavericks causing splits and dissention (sic) in the House.”

The letter requests signatures of those committed to the cause.

State Rep. TerriLois Gregory, R-Baldwin City, who is chair of the group of new House Republicans, which calls itself the 150 Caucus, said the document was brought to the caucus as an idea from “one individual” whom she did not identify. She said signatures were not collected because the document is essentially the Kansas Republican Party platform.

The document says:

• Kansas should change its judicial selection process to require legislative confirmation of judges or adopting election of judges statewide.

• Oppose using public revenues for abortion and funding organizations that advocate abortion rights.

• All state documents should be made only in English.

• E-Verify should be required by employers to check on the citizenship status of workers.

• Repeal the law granting in-state tuition to the children of illegal immigrants.

• Passage of Arizona-type immigration law.

• Adoption of law aimed at blocking federal health reform in Kansas.

• Repeal law setting up state-owned casinos.

• The state budget should not increase more than the rate of inflation or population growth.

• Allow school vouchers.

• Require government-issued photo ID to vote.

• Federal constitutional amendment that states marriage can only be between one man and one woman.

• Prohibit government from seizing property for economic development.

• Opposition of legislation imposing limits on carbon dioxide emissions. “Carbon dioxide, one of the most common gases on the earth, should not be declared a pollutant nor used as an excuse to deny the construction of new power plants in Kansas,” the document states.

• Prohibit taxpayer funding of lobbyists and lawsuits against Kansas for additional state funding.

Comments

The_Bends 3 years, 10 months ago

Fan the flames of the culture war, for animus is their "ideology."

blindrabbit 3 years, 10 months ago

Back to the past! Glory, glory Hallealuja. Hitler would be proud!

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

From Wikipedia,

Hitler admired the Italian fascists, and in 1922 presented Nazism as a German form of fascism.

Nazis were more fascists than socialists.

monheim 3 years, 10 months ago

Wow, this thread got Godwin'ed in the SECOND post! That's gotta be a record...

Flap Doodle 3 years, 10 months ago

I've started ordering Godwin flags by the pallet.

kansanjayhawk 3 years, 10 months ago

Just remember that Hitler was the leader of the "National Socialist Party" he was not a conservative... by the way I thought we were trying to use civility in our discourse now...

William Weissbeck 3 years, 10 months ago

Other than the fact that most of these proposals are creating mountains out of mole hills, the two that are the most idiotic are the direct election of judges/legislative confirmation - if the examples from other states like Illinois and the debacle in the federal system aren't proof, then these guys really don't read the papers - they just listen to their "inner voices." And what to do with the "children of illegals?" They can't all forgo college and work in the meat packing plants and the farm fields. I'm guessing that too many of these dim bulbs in the legislature have been drinking the water straight out of the river in Dodge (which is sand by the way for the Eastern folks).

1029 3 years, 10 months ago

As long as they lower my taxes and they stop babies from being murdered, they can do whatever else they want. I really don't care. All this politics stuff is way too complicated for my simple conservative brain to fully understand.

costello 3 years, 10 months ago

Who's going to support all those babies, if not taxpayers?

I'm not being a smart aleck; I'm genuinely puzzled. Who do you imagine is having abortions? These babies will need medical care and food and housing and education, and their parents (or more likely just mothers) won't be able to afford it. And some of them will end up in foster care and need all the special services often required by abused and neglected children who've suffered trauma at a young age.

Honestly your taxes will have to go up.

monheim 3 years, 10 months ago

Have you ever heard of satire? Read the comment again.

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

I like a few of those, but many aren't great, in my opinion.

And, I'd like it a little better if it didn't contain a spelling error, as well.

ksriver2010 3 years, 10 months ago

Wow. This is more extreme than I expected. "All state documents should be made only in English"?! Half the @#$! state is Hispanic! (at least 70% of Western Kansas, at least).

What about the economy? You were elected because of the economy. It's the economy stupid!

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

So you support that platform? This may be the first time I've heard you say what you're for, rather than against.

tomatogrower 3 years, 10 months ago

They are dictating who employers hire They are dictating that women must have children. They are dictating that we have no right to clean air. They are dictating that people can't gamble. They are dictating that Mexican Americans or anyone who might look Mexican American must carry around their birth certificate. They will have to dictate that all private schools take anyone with a voucher, or be sued for unfair spending of tax dollars. No dictatorship style government here.

ivalueamerica 3 years, 10 months ago

and here you show your extreme failure to Kansas and the USA.

You think it is bad when they do it and good when you do it.

If you have morals and values you would do what is right, not what it takes for your side to win, right or wrong.

And you and those like you are the failure of the USA, no matter what side of the aisle.

wmathews 3 years, 10 months ago

I take this to be Alf calling only elected leaders morons, which is political speech. His comment won't be removed.

chalice2 3 years, 10 months ago

I hope your Spanish is better than your English.

question4u 3 years, 10 months ago

At a location where Esperanto is spoken they might understand that you're trying to pay with ancient Roman coins. You'll be better understood in most places if you use the Latin (denarius) or the Spanish (denario) to refer to those ancient coins, but wouldn't it be better to take them to a coin dealer rather than trying to spend them at a store?

George_Braziller 3 years, 10 months ago

OK, let's just ignore that whole "separation of powers" thing. Maybe she flunked government class in high school.

-- Kansas should change its judicial selection process to require legislative confirmation of judges or adopting election of judges statewide.

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

Well, legislative confirmation might be ok - we do it with SC judges at the national level, don't we?

Direct election is another story though.

William Weissbeck 3 years, 10 months ago

The federal confirmation of judges is a big mess - it's called the filibuster. The GOP would rather have no judges, than judges they don't like. There is no independence if a judge has to toe a political line to get confirmation.

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

I thought it was intended as one of the checks and balances, without which the executive branch can simply appoint them - not much independence there either.

But I agree it's problematic in practice.

A particularly troubling part is that they can simply say whatever they need to say to get confirmed, and then once on the bench, there's little to no recourse if they go against it.

I take each case on an individual basis, and can't comment on generalities.

That issue might come before the court, and so I can't comment on it.

I have great respect for precedent.

Etc.

MyName 3 years, 10 months ago

Legislative confirmation does work, but rather slowly. But with basically a single party legislature and a third or move of those devoted to red meat politics, the only reason why the legislature wants this is so they can neuter any moderate Democrat or Republican that manages to be elected governor.

The process right now works and is non-political, so why scrap it?

blindrabbit 3 years, 10 months ago

Herr's Brownback and Kobach: Please don't thrown out us Brownshirts without a couple of right-wing events Night of Long Knives, Kristalnacht , Book Burning, and ghetto formation; and what about a aryan youth movement to fit in with your anglo-only leanings.

thebigspoon 3 years, 10 months ago

Because it wasn't Brownback and company. Because it didn't try to run roughshod over the Constitution. Because it didn't try to reinvent the wheel. Because it held itself accountable to the ENTIRE population of the state. Because it did not try to pretend it was the be-all and endall of politics. Because it cared for the entire population and its races and creeds. Because.

That's why, and a whole lot more.

guesswho 3 years, 10 months ago

Require government-issued photo ID to vote? that sounds like creating a whole new level of government bureaucracy.

All state documents only in English? OK, so let's not try to attract any non-English speaking tourists to KS.

E-Verifty sounts pretty nifty to me (OK, that was probably an LJW typo - but being as our newly elected representatives can't spell dissension, this is all a bit worrisome)

Public revenues could mean just about anything. Is fixing a street near a clinic included in this?

Repeal the law granting in-state tuition to the children of illegal immigrants. Right, because we would hate for a child to pay for the sins of their parents and not try to get an education to improve/his or her life. Much better to be a drop-out.

Federal constitutional amendment that states marriage can only be between one man and one woman. - ummm, they are going to propose a federal constitutional amendment? I think we should look towards Virginia's Racial Integrity Act of 1924 as a fine example of government intruding in marriage.

passing an Arizona-type immigration law? Really? Why? What $ will it save? Will we get the prison industry to back it as they did in AZ?

sigh.

monkeyhawk 3 years, 10 months ago

"Require government-issued photo ID to vote? that sounds like creating a whole new level of government bureaucracy."

Right, let's just abolish the citizenship thing all together (even though they sure can whip something out for welfare entitlements when they need to).

"All state documents only in English? OK, so let's not try to attract any non-English speaking tourists to KS."

As if - Ks is a destination for foreign tourism????

"...we would hate for a child to pay for the sins of their parents..."

No, it is much better for taxpaying suckers to be forced to pay for the sins of the parents.

I hope the coming years will be excruciatingly long for some.

MyName 3 years, 10 months ago

Regarding the voting issue: the system we have now has work just fine for 150 years. What reason do we have to change it besides to make some cowboys out in western KS feel better about a complete non-issue? Same thing with the BS about state documents.

And no one every pays state taxes if they work here legally (or illegally). There's no way that someone who has lived and worked in KS could possibly have paid sales tax or property taxes? I mean clearly the only "taxpaying suckers" in this state are the ones whose ancestors were born here in 1865 and I'm sure 100% of them agree with your misguided views on immigration.

Or maybe we really are a nation of immigrants who give basic rights to everyone who lives here.

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

Gotta say I'm pretty happy about the idea of prohibiting government from seizing property for economic development. Right now the law is almost right - a city can't take your house and sell it to another private entity unless they get the legislature's approval. The legislature should not be able to grant that kind of approval; if NASCAR or Target wants your house, they've got to pony up just like anyone else. http://www.castlecoalition.org/

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

Agreed - eminent domain is often abused.

There was an interesting case in New London, CT - the Kelo case - they lost their property, and apparently after all of the demolition, the proposed development didn't even take place.

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

See, I knew you liked law ;)

Kansas law was changed after Kelo; up to that point we had some of the worst law in the country. The abuse was not as widespread as some other places, but when Merriam can condemn a used car lot just so Aristocrat Motors next door can expand, that's a problem. Now there's just one loophole which, thankfully, has not been used yet. I'll be happy to see that avenue closed.

You want my house, you pay me, not a politician.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

Interestingly, George W. Bush's only business venture that wasn't a complete failure was his tenure as a baseball executive, where his one and only job was to help the team use eminent domain to take over private property so taxpayers could pay for his and his partners' new baseball stadium.

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

At last, something on which we wholly agree.

oklahoma 3 years, 10 months ago

Excellent list. Would make Kansas a much better place to live.

jafs 3 years, 10 months ago

For whom?

Not for gay folks who want to marry. Or those with children in public schools, as vouchers drain the funding from public education.

That last one's interesting too - are they going to prohibit lawsuits, or just the tax funded part? And, if they do, how exactly will we hold them accountable for funding the educational system adequately?

Teachers probably don't have the resources to fund that sort of lawsuit.

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

I can see repealing the state-owned casinos bit as well. Not that I'm opposed to gaming (it's your money, play away) but because it's the Indians' gig. Let them have it.

Kansas is always late to gambling anyway (and dog tracks, and slots, and the lottery), consistently getting in just as the market is saturated by other states and entities. Besides, it's unseemly to take advantage of people who are bad at math.

loveroflarry 3 years, 10 months ago

I didn't know people from India ran casinos in Kansas

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

Feather Indian, of which I am one, not dot Indian, of which I am not. Save your faux-confusion for someone who thinks it's clever, of whom I am definitely not one.

loveroflarry 3 years, 10 months ago

Ah, your preference toward keeping the state out of the casino "game" makes sense, limit competition.

Per your response, should I then assume that all people who use the term Indian are "Feather Indian's"

Fossick 3 years, 10 months ago

Of course it's a matter of limiting competition, especially from government. Not much different than Blockbusters not wanting a government-run video-rental store next door and your local car dealer not being happy with the government selling cars next door, I suspect.

Why would you assume that all Indians use the same terminology to refer to themselves?

echobox 3 years, 10 months ago

What's their stance on illegal immigrants seeking abortions? Is that good or bad?

hujiko 3 years, 10 months ago

If conservatives are wholly against bigger governments then why create additional legislation such as: -- All state documents should be made only in English. -- Passage of Arizona-type immigration law. -- Require government-issued photo ID to vote. -- Federal constitutional amendment that states marriage can only be between one man and one woman.

The so called party of morality fails to see the injustice of denying fundamental rights to others. Marginalizing any one group because of a specific quality is unconstitutional. Try reading the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for once.

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

hujiko 3 years, 10 months ago

Is that all you have to counter with? Or is the inherent hypocrisy too much for you to handle?

JackMcKee 3 years, 10 months ago

Most of these proposals are going to cause considerably more harm to Kansas than good.

tomatogrower 3 years, 10 months ago

It's the economy stupid!! When are they going to get the message? I see nothing in there that would attract more business, let alone more people to move to Kansas.

Chris Golledge 3 years, 10 months ago

"Carbon dioxide, one of the most common gases on the earth..."

Really? Aren't these the same people who say that CO2 is a trace gas and therefore can not affect the climate?

Anyway, it's nice to see that their understanding of physics and chemistry is as good as their spelling.

hujiko 3 years, 10 months ago

78% is nitrogen 20% is oxygen 1% is argon

0.1% is carbon dioxide

the remaining volume is made of noble gases, ozone, and water vapor

The only reason why carbon dioxide is "one of the most common gases" (and by that it's still only fourth) is that we have continuously pumped emissions into our atmosphere for over a century. The loss of groundwater, the increased airborne pollutants such as mercury or lead, and the fact that the electricity generated will NOT be serving Kansas are all good reasons to not build the Holcomb coal plants.

Chris Golledge 3 years, 10 months ago

Actually, CO2 is about 0.039%, which makes it less than 0.1%, not greater than. Also, you are leaving out water vapor, which is approximately 0.4% overall, but most of it is concentrated near the surface.

Still, it's nice to see that our elected officials think that 0.039% of something is puts it in the category of "most common" things.

hujiko 3 years, 10 months ago

Whoops, I meant to use the less than symbol "<", thanks for catching that. However I didn't neglect water vapor in the equation, it's the last thing I mentioned.

There have been periods in Earth's history where CO2 was at much higher levels than today, but they are removed from today by millions of years. Such a spike in CO2 levels in recent history is a new trend that has no precedent with the current rates of warming we are observing. What long term impacts this may generate are unknown, but the short term impacts seem to be an increasing number of fringe weather events beyond the yearly averages. Hotter summers, colder winters, extreme droughts, or inundating floods could all result at higher frequency, changing the yearly norms. In perhaps lesser time, the climates we enjoy today will be much different tomorrow.

Sorry for the blather.

tomatogrower 3 years, 10 months ago

I say we should pump lots of carbon dioxide into their houses. Maybe some mercury too. Isn't that a "natural" substance?

Steve Jacob 3 years, 10 months ago

The government is trying hard to make the Hard Rock Casino go away. They almost stopped building when they talked about a smoking ban, now this?

ronwell_dobbs 3 years, 10 months ago

Didn't really expect our new "representative" from Baldwin City to embarrass us in the first week, but what did I really expect?

riverdrifter 3 years, 10 months ago

I've lived in Baldwin City all my life and I'd never heard of her until her yard signs popped all over town last fall.

SnakeFist 3 years, 10 months ago

Regressives only want to stop funding abortion but want a federal constitutional amendment prohibiting gay marriage? Apparently, regressives don't want to stop the "murder of children" as much as they want to stop "Adam and Steve" from marrying.

Kirk Larson 3 years, 10 months ago

No, it's Arizona that has the death panels instituted by the republican governor. Two dead and counting.

jonas_opines 3 years, 10 months ago

You really don't know what you're talking about, do you?

tomatogrower 3 years, 10 months ago

Rockchalk - The options for end of life care have nothing to do with anyone cutting off anyone. My mother who had congestive heart failure had a discussion with her doctors when she was getting tired of breathing, 2 years longer than the doctors expected, by the way. The last time she went to the hospital she made it quite clear that there should be no resuscitation. Would you have taken that right away from her? She was hooked up to a machine that would beep every time her blood oxygen would go too low. We would tell her to breath deeper over and over again. She did it for us, but we could see she was tired and wanted to stop. We finally told them to turn off the beeping. She quietly left us. Although we mourned, we knew she was ready to pass on. You would have denied her that peaceful passing by hooking her up to a machine? You would give her no choice over her medical care?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

"which may include advance directives to forgo aggressive life-sustaining treatment."

Directives from whom? You conveniently leave that out, but that's because it's directives from the patient, not the doctor, and providing that bit of information would completely destroy the fearmongering title of "death panel."

Kirk Larson 3 years, 10 months ago

I found that book to be terrifying just because something like could actually happen. /shiver

bearded_gnome 3 years, 10 months ago

and the problem is ... what?

I vote yes oneach item.
thanks, you boys and girls in the state legislature, go and do these points!

move it along!

oldvet 3 years, 10 months ago

Well, in the words of the great obama when discussing his refusal to listen to bipartisan ideas for his stimulus package...

"I won!"

Suck it up, boys...

tomatogrower 3 years, 10 months ago

It's been a long time now, but I did have to show my birth certificate to get my license. I remember, because my mother couldn't find it, and we had to send off to Topeka for a new one. Oh,oh maybe I was really born in Kenya.

Ralph Reed 3 years, 10 months ago

Outside of the obvious faults with the letter (I would call it a manifesto) of misspelling and anonymity because of no signatures (failure to and inability to take responsibility for what they say), I several things wrong with the points. Points, I might add, for which there will be no debate. In fact, they dictate what people can and cannot do, even down to their bedroom and personal lives. @Tom: You said at 1312 that the above points will be a relief after "tyrannical dictatorial style governing" for the past 2 and 4 years. The GOP has held the KS legislature for years. Go back and check your facts again; they might actually be in conflict with your bullet points.

As a note, I have no doubt that I will be called a loony-lefty (or some version of that) by several who post here. But that's OK; I'm not poking fingers, I would like a discussion. Somehow though, I don't think that will happen. In any event, here goes...


First two points:

  1. Kansas should change its judicial selection process to require legislative confirmation of judges or adopting election of judges statewide.

This will either bind up the selection process as it is in the US Senate (see secret holds on nominations) and/or politicize the judicial process and make judges beholden to a specific political party. The current system really isn't broken, so why try and fix it? Retention votes are on almost every general election ballot. If you don't like a judge's ruling because of your ideological beliefs, then start a movement and vote her or him out. The process is already there, so use it.

  1. Oppose using public revenues for abortion and funding organizations that advocate abortion rights.

The first part isn't done as far as I know, so it's simply there to ideologically placate constituents. Please provide references if I'm wrong. The second part makes no sense. What organizations advocate abortion (be specific, please and let everyone know)? I know many that advocate birth control and safe sex of all sorts, but I don't know of any that advocate abortions. Again, if you know of some, let us know and please be specific. I won't go into my personal views on abortion as I stated them before several times - go look for them.

Ralph Reed 3 years, 10 months ago

My comments on points 3 thru 6:

  1. All state documents should be made only in English.

This will increase the cost to the state to redesign and reprint existing forms. In light of the Governor’s desire to decrease the budge, how can the anonymous ones really advocate doing this? Also, will this preclude Federal forms from being used in Kansas? They printed in multiple languages. The extreme is that this might also result in there being no state foreign language tests. They would be state forms and necessarily printed in a language other than English.

  1. E-Verify should be required by employers to check on the citizenship status of workers.

This implies that someone who is not a citizen cannot work. The point says nothing about those holding green cards. They’re not citizens and according to this point they can’t be hired. If the anonymous ones change the point to comply with the Federal Law it might be palatable.

  1. Repeal the law granting in-state tuition to the children of illegal immigrants.

Think about how much this is actually costing the state, next to nothing in the grand scheme of things. This is another ideological talking point. Take this example. A high school graduate grows up in the same town his entire life. Speaks only English and doesn’t know anything about Mexico, Canada, or any other country. His parents are illegal immigrants who brought him here as an infant of less than one year old. He graduates with a 4.0 GPA and is denied access to college for something that was not his fault. Well done. (Why not do that for everyone with blond hair and green eyes? That makes just as much sense.) Instead, allow him to stay here, attend college with in-state tuition and earn a good degree, becoming a tax-paying member of society. Then, let him apply for and earn citizenship which is a lengthy process. After that he can apply to bring his parents to the US – this will be at least 10 to 12 years after he started college. What’s wrong with that?

  1. Passage of Arizona-type immigration law.

Where’s the money to pay for it? Will there be a special police for to enforce it? There are many unintended consequences for doing this. Federal laws are already on the books, and the Governor can mandate that the local and state law enforcement agencies enforce them.

Fred Whitehead Jr. 3 years, 10 months ago

Sieg Heil, Seig Heil, Seig Heil!!!!! (Translation: "Hail Victory") Defination: We applaud the means and methods of the Third Reich, We will dictate what is good and evil, We will laude and glorify the "Good" and destroy the (what we say is) Evil. This is the way of the Reich. Seig Heil, Seig Heil, Seig Heil. Support your local gauleiter!!!!!!

Flap Doodle 3 years, 10 months ago

Double Godwin for frwent's usual lameness.

Ralph Reed 3 years, 10 months ago

My comments on points 7 thru 10:

  1. Adoption of law aimed at blocking federal health reform in Kansas.

This is simply ideological, will cost money that state does not have and is pandering to talking points. Why, logically should this be done? What happens when/if the lawsuit fails, will the State start campaigning for a Constitutional Amendment? Also, my taxes will go up because those without health insurance will start going back to the ER for sore throats, colds and so on, the costs of which will be passed on to me when they cannot pay.

  1. Repeal law setting up state-owned casinos.

Why? If the profits go into the state budget, then this might be a good thing. Show me what’s so wrong with it, other than it’s gambling, which is sinful (as everyone knows).

  1. The state budget should not increase more than the rate of inflation or population growth.

Pick one or the other and stick with it. Then, think about costs. The state contracts for a gasoline price six months or a year at a time. Where’s the money going to come from when gas prices go up again, because they’re never going down? What will you cut? This is simply more ideological pandering.

  1. Allow school vouchers.

Only when private schools are required to accept all comers as are public schools, inclusive education in other words, only when they’re required to adhere to the same standards or better than public schools, and only when students must take the same subjects to enter college (the study of evolution as an example). One big downside to this is that public schools will decrease in quality because of lack of funding. This will then create a dual standard of the haves and have nots in schools; much worse than it is now.

cowboy 3 years, 10 months ago

Might want to concentrate on some jobs you morons.

Ralph Reed 3 years, 10 months ago

The rest of the points:

  1. Require government-issued photo ID to vote.

See my comment from 3 Jan 2011 here:

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/jan/03/coalition-fight-photo-voter-id-proposal/#c1470572

  1. Federal constitutional amendment that states marriage can only be between one man and one woman.

Yes, let’s marginalize a portion of our population taking away their rights. It makes perfect sense. Think about it, is that what the Constitution is supposed to be for, taking away rights? I thought it was designed to protect rights. We’ve slowly included everyone under the umbrella of the Constitution and now you want to throw some out simply because your particular faith belief doesn’t like what they are. Where will it stop? Why not just tear it up in small pieces?

See George Orwell’s Animal Farm. “All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.”

  1. Prohibit government from seizing property for economic development.

If enacted, then this must be applied equally. Don’t condemn and seize my property simply to build a road or sell it so a developer can build a big box. I don’t feel the KS Legislature will apply such a law equally, instead it will be applied only to support selected (read as "the right kind of") business interests at the expense of citizens.

  1. Opposition of legislation imposing limits on carbon dioxide emissions. “Carbon dioxide, one of the most common gases on the earth, should not be declared a pollutant nor used as an excuse to deny the construction of new power plants in Kansas.”

This is directed specifically for the coal-fired power plant in western Kansas. As such, it’s pandering to a specific coalition. There’s already a large body of comment on this which I won’t repeat here as I’m sure (hope) you’ve read most of it. Ask yourself this, why didn’t Colorado, Oklahoma and Nebraska want the power plant built in their states.

  1. Prohibit taxpayer funding of lobbyists and lawsuits against Kansas for additional state funding.

I support the first part. The second part is directed solely at the KNEA for suing the State of Kansas because the state did not follow the state constitution when it stipulated that the State must adequately fund public education. What are they trying to do, legislate away a State Constitutional mandate? This is also marginalizing a section of our population.

JustNoticed 3 years, 10 months ago

I hope they at least institute a program for free vaseline for the people.

Kirk Larson 3 years, 10 months ago

• Federal constitutional amendment that states marriage can only be between one man and one woman.

Like former legislator Forrest Swall once said: You're either for Fred Phelps or you're against him.

Notabonehead 3 years, 10 months ago

Agenda in one sentence:

"We support elected judges funding abortions for uninsured gayly married illigal immigrants that vote and refuse to conceal handguns."

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