Lawrence and Douglas County

Lawrence and Douglas county

Public invited to explore plants, wildlife at newly restored Baker Wetlands

Roger Boyd, director of natural resources at Baker University, left, along with students in his wildlife management class and his son Jon Boyd, resident refuge manager of the Baker Wetlands Restoration Site, spread mulch on a trail at the site Thursday. The site, west of Louisiana and south of 31st Street, is Phase 1 of the mitigation for the South Lawrence Trafficway. Phase 1 involves the restoration of 142 acres from agricultural land back into wetlands. A number of American kestrels, eastern bluebirds and tree swallows have been banded in numerous nest boxes on the site.

Roger Boyd, director of natural resources at Baker University, left, along with students in his wildlife management class and his son Jon Boyd, resident refuge manager of the Baker Wetlands Restoration Site, spread mulch on a trail at the site Thursday. The site, west of Louisiana and south of 31st Street, is Phase 1 of the mitigation for the South Lawrence Trafficway. Phase 1 involves the restoration of 142 acres from agricultural land back into wetlands. A number of American kestrels, eastern bluebirds and tree swallows have been banded in numerous nest boxes on the site.

November 5, 2010

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New walking trails and boardwalks are already in place for visitors.

New walking trails and boardwalks are already in place for visitors.

The Baker wetlands restoration site west of Louisiana Street and south of 31st Street is Phase 1 of the mitigation for the South Lawrence Trafficway. Phase 1 involved the restoration of 142 acres from agricultural land back into wetlands. New walking trails and boardwalks are already in place for visitors.

The Baker wetlands restoration site west of Louisiana Street and south of 31st Street is Phase 1 of the mitigation for the South Lawrence Trafficway. Phase 1 involved the restoration of 142 acres from agricultural land back into wetlands. New walking trails and boardwalks are already in place for visitors.

On a chilly morning this week, Roger Boyd walked through the newly restored Baker Wetlands pointing out raccoon tracks, favorite sunbathing spots for turtles and the presence of goldfinches, American avocets and quail.

Since Baker University began transforming 142 acres of cornfields into wetlands two years ago, an estimated 130 different plants, as well as deer, coyotes, beavers, opossums and birds, have laid claim to the land.

However, there’s one species Boyd would like to see more of: humans.

With walking trails, a boardwalk, picnic tables and a gravel parking lot, the freshly mitigated wetlands are open to the public, even if few people seem to know about them.

“Everything we need for wetland restoration is physically done,” said Boyd, who is the director of natural resources at Baker University. “What we are doing now is maintaining it. We don’t want it all to be cattails.”

The wetlands, which aren’t exactly new since the land probably held similar vegetation and habitat before it became cropland a 150 years ago, sits south of town, west of Louisiana Street. The entrance is off North 1250 Road and marked by a bright orange sign welcoming visitors. The parking area is next door to a white farm house that is owned by the Kansas Department of Transportation and lived in by Boyd’s son Jon, who is the residential refuge manager at the site.

“You’re free to walk around. You don’t need to knock on the door or anything. It’s opened to the public,” Jon Boyd said. “We’d rather you not litter, and dogs are welcomed.”

While the management of restored wetlands is a job never finished, Roger Boyd has declared the transformation from cornfield to wetlands to be a successful one.

The project is tied to the controversial proposed expansion of the South Lawrence Trafficway, which would extend the existing four-lane road seven miles east from U.S. Highway 59 to Kansas Highway 10.

If funded, the new highway would align along 32nd Street. That route would destroy 60 acres in the north section of the original Baker Wetlands.

To make up for the loss of wetlands, KDOT agreed to restore 142 acres on the west side of the original Baker Wetlands and 160 acres on the east side.

KDOT’s plans for building the $188 million highway continue to wait on state funding and the resolution of a lawsuit filed by people wanting to save the existing wetlands. Despite those delays, the state agency went ahead with a $975,000 contract with Baker University to build new wetlands.

The 142-acre tract began its transformation in fall 2008 when cornstalks were mowed down. During the past two years, more than 56,000 cubic yards of dirt were moved as excavators dug crescent-shaped swales and a stream channel.

Millions of seeds from 108 species in the original wetlands were gathered and dispersed throughout the new wetlands on a windy day.

This summer, the 1,100-foot boardwalk and 1,800-foot walking trail leading to the boardwalk opened. The trail takes visitors to a four-acre lake, a favorite spot for water fowl.

Last week, Boyd said the site caused a stir among local bird watchers when a flock of sandhill cranes landed at the lake, a bird that is typically spotted in Douglas County about once a decade.

Work remains at the wetlands, including a diagonal path to cut through the property and an old silo to be turned into an observation deck.

Once KDOT finishes the last leg of the trafficway, Boyd said a visitor’s center will go up and restoration will start on the 162 acres of floodplain on the other side of the original wetlands.

In the meantime, Boyd said people should continue to see the new wetlands evolve.

“There’s a lot of changes going on here,” he said.

Comments

Ken Lassman 4 years, 8 months ago

You know, I was a bit of a skeptic when I watched that field transform from a corn and beans crop field into an extension of the wetlands that lie east of Louisiana St., but I've taken a stop there and what the Boyds have done really speaks for itself. I don't care whether you are for or against the trafficway, this place is being accepted by the wildlife in the area better than jayhawks lining up to the Oread Hotel. One of the cool things about it is that where the silo/lookout is, you are higher up so you can see across the wetlands and get a great view, better than the wetlands to the east.

Bottom line: the wildlife in the area win hands-down.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

Actually, it's planned to be 10 lanes of traffic. The new 32nd street probably at 45 mph, and the SLT itself will probably be 65-70 mph.

Ken Lassman 4 years, 8 months ago

Yes, that could be a problem if it ever gets built, which is still an open question that could easily go to the never-being-built answer. But two additional points: 1) Improving wildlife habitat is a worthy goal regardless of whether a trafficway is built, and this is an excellent location for habitat restoration. 2) Wildlife use the Wakarusa as their highway, since it is a water source and connects up with Clinton wildlife areas, so the thing to do to avoid wildlife-highway interactions is to create a continuous green corridor all along the Wakarusa, giving wildlife their own highway, so to speak.

kernal 4 years, 7 months ago

I've been wondering about that myself. And why the fence in the middle of the swamp?

Richard Heckler 4 years, 8 months ago

No matter this does not grant the right of destruction of the Haskell-Baker Wetlands. Haskell-Baker wetlands provides Lawrence with tons of natural flood control and wildlife habitat that MIGHT could be replaced by man blowing millions upon millions upon millions of big government tax dollars that which is reckless spending. Many homes downstream are potential victims means leave it alone.

There can be no guarantee that man made flood control will be effective in which plenty of Lawrence,Kansas locations clearly demonstrate.

conservative 4 years, 8 months ago

What natural flood control? The wetlands only stay wet because of the manmade dikes along the wakarusa river. Get rid of those and the water still flows perfectly just doesn't create the wetlands which are not natural.

sourpuss 4 years, 8 months ago

I should think a conservative would want to protect nature and keep the world as it was made. What is more conservative than that? Humans are part of the world and letting different creatures live near and around us makes for a more pleasant world. Unless you'd rather see everything paved over?

For example, when I was in NYC 20 years ago, hardly any trees had been planted in Manhattan. Now, you go there and not only are there trees everywhere but I saw a whole lane of trees being planted in Brooklyn after a new sidewalk had been put in. People can live in harmony with nature. This shouldn't be a political thing. Why is it okay to build an unnatural freeway but not an unnatural wetland? Can't we have both?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

"KDOT’s plans for building the $188 million highway continue to wait on state funding and the resolution of a lawsuit filed by people wanting to save the existing wetlands. Despite those delays, the state agency went ahead with a $975,000 contract with Baker University to build new wetlands."

Why no mention of the $8 million Baker and Boyd will get for allowing the destruction of the Haskell Wetlands?

riverdrifter 4 years, 8 months ago

Roger doesn't get a nickle of that. Try again.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

You're right-- guaranteed lifetime employment adds up to considerably more than a nickel.

Christine Pennewell Davis 4 years, 8 months ago

Wow turning a positive into a negative, come on this article is about what they have done with the land and no matter if the slt gets done or not the job they have done in just two years. And as of right now looks pretty good and people friendly and look at it this way if you go visit it you do not have to deal with the 31s st. traffic when parking that in its self is a plus.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

This "positive" is only happening as a ruse to justify an extreme negative.

DRsmith 4 years, 8 months ago

I would rather explore a nice 4 lane highway through the wetlands.

Sharon Aikins 4 years, 8 months ago

Great job, Boyd's and Baker! Guess we'd better start building those Arks though.

Fred Whitehead Jr. 4 years, 8 months ago

Yeah, great job. Creating more mosquito breeding grounds for the residents of south Lawrence. City ordnances prohibit standing water as a public nuisance, yet the city government turns a blind eye o this public nuisance caving in to the frog-kissers and tree-huggers with no concern to the problems this political sham creates for residents.

I have never, ever heard of giving kudos to people who actually create violations of public ordnances and public well-being.

George_Braziller 4 years, 8 months ago

Have you actually ever been to the wetlands? I spent several days there over the summer and never saw a single mosquito. Not one.

Fred Whitehead Jr. 4 years, 8 months ago

George, I live out here and in the evenings, you cannot go outside without being ravaged by hordes of mosquitos. Don't try to deny the obvious, I have lived out here for over 30 years and every year it is the same problem. That damned swamp is a breeding ground for disease-carrying insects that attack the residents of this area of south Lawrence.

George_Braziller 4 years, 8 months ago

You sure they're not the mosquitoes living in your lawn? I've been to the wetlands in the evening and never seen a mosquito only to be attacked by them when I returned home.

gatekeeper 4 years, 8 months ago

All of Lawrence has them. All of KS does. Get used to it. At the wetlands, there are tons of little mosquito eating fish. I've sat and watched them in action. They eat the larva. You might have less mosquitos than we have in N. Lawrence.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

George and Gatekeeper are right. Besides the mosquito fish there are many frogs (multiple species) and many species of dragonfly and damselfly larvae as well as other invertebrates that eat mosquitoes in a healthy wetlands. You probably should check all of those stacks of tires in your back yard - everyone is a mosquito breeder. Quit blaming the wetlands - its not the REAL problem.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

ask Mr. boyd how US Code law Title 25 Chapter 7, Section 293 a, or the Federal indian School Surplus Lands Act of 1962 formerly known as Public 47 and Public 87 was violated? Connect the dots.... the 1962 law allows for 50 acres at one time to be granted to a PUBLIC eligible institution, not a private one like Baker University. 572.68 acres were transferred at one time by circumventing the congressional federal decree in essense laundering the land through the Health Education and Welfare Department to avoid the 50 acres at one time federal law decree. If it looks like a duck, it's not a dinosaur, it's a duck. Circumventing the law by bypassing agencies reminds me of the chicanery that allowed most of eastern kansas to be stolen through Manypenny treaties in 1854 and 1855. Non-Indians never steal for profit, never, not even when they get $8 million for lands they were granted for a dollar. Of course I've been stating this point in letters to the editor since 1998 and the road is still not built. I guess we didn't go away, I guess we weren't outside agitators as we were called back then, I know we're right and the court case is probably coming. I drive by there every day and don't see hardly any animals like the ones I see on the other side that reminds me of my former home, Louisiana.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

If there was one scintilla of truth of illegality of transfer of this land Touschy, Bob Eye would be all over it like flies on you know what and into the courthouse in a nanosecond.

You may not like it, but no law was violated. Period. Your view of "circumvention" is a political opinion of yours, but is not supported in law.

In that regard, you are no better than Tom Shewmon relative to truth-telling ability. It's too bad too, because nobody then can trust any other thing you say.

kcwarpony 4 years, 8 months ago

Just because it may have been legal does not make it morally right.

riverdrifter 4 years, 8 months ago

Haskell didn't want it, washed their hands of it. Offered to KU who didn't want it. Baker accepted it.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

The "Haskell" that didn't want it at that time were a bunch of white administrators in Washington, most of whom had likely never even set foot on the Haskell campus.

somedude20 4 years, 8 months ago

Sweet! Hydroponic ditch weed (and you can see some beavers)

ferrislives 4 years, 8 months ago

This is a great story regardless of your point of view on the SLT, although I'm personally ready for it to be built. This mitigation resulted in a nice compromise, and kudos to the Boyd's and others for getting it done in a great way.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

"This mitigation resulted in a nice compromise,"

A "compromise" means that each side gives and takes. Haskell got nothing, and will have nearly everything taken.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

AHHH - but that was clearly the decision made by several individual faculty and administrators at Haskell. They could have "sold their souls" as well and come out with their own compromise which would have benefitted the students for many generations into the future. Be careful what you wish for!!

Clark Coan 4 years, 8 months ago

Roger's father spent years of hard work restoring the wetlands. He would be rolling over in his grave if he knew his son was a party to destroying what he'd worked on for so long.

Funding for completing the SLT is the highest priority for KDOT under the new highway bill. If the lawsuit doesn't stop it, 8-10 lanes of road will be built through the boardwalk and the deepest part of the wetlands (including KU's 20 acres). The new chancellor could stop it (no state agency can condemn the land of another state agency) but she won't.

ferrislives 4 years, 8 months ago

I'm seriously curious: where do you see that they plan to build an "8-10 lane" highway?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

4 lanes for 32nd street, and 4-6 lanes for the SLT.

mr_right_wing 4 years, 8 months ago

So you could draw a parallel; you make improvements to Allen Field House so the fans can enjoy it more.

You 'restore' the wetlands-which are man-made, so the animals can enjoy it more. (...and humans on a secondary level.)

Got it.

sweatybutcher 4 years, 8 months ago

Job well done! Thanks for the article, JW. I'll put the wetlands on my local outdoor destination list. Thanks to everyone for all their hard work. Keep thinking and building.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

§ 293a. Conveyance of school properties to local school districts or public agencies

The Secretary of the Interior, or his authorized representative, is authorized to convey to State or local governmental agencies or to local school authorities all the right, title, and interest of the United States in any land and improvements thereon and personal property used in connection therewith heretofore or hereafter used for Federal Indian school purposes and no longer needed for such purposes: Provided, That the consent of the beneficial owner shall be obtained before the conveyance of title to land held by the United States in trust for an individual Indian or Indian tribe: Provided further, That no more than fifty acres of land shall be transferred under the terms of this section in connection with any single school property conveyed to State or local governmental agencies or to local school authorities. Any conveyance under this section shall reserve all mineral deposits in the land and the right to prospect for and remove such deposits under rules and regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior, shall require the property to be used for school or other public purposes, and shall require the property to be available to Indians and non-Indians on the same terms unless otherwise approved by the Secretary of the Interior. If at any time the Secretary of the Interior determines that the grantee of any such lands, improvements, and personal property has failed to observe the provisions of the transfer agreement and that the failure has continued for at least one year, he may declare a forfeiture of the conveyance and the title conveyed shall thereupon revert to the United States. Such determination by the Secretary of the Interior shall be final. If the grantee of such land fails for a period of one year to observe the provisions of the transfer agreement and the Secretary of the Interior fails to declare a forfeiture of the conveyance, the former beneficial owner, if an individual Indian or an Indian tribe, may petition the United States District Court for the district where the land is located to declare a forfeiture of the conveyance and to vest the title in the United States, in the same trust status as previously existed.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

This regulation was violated from the get go, and Baker has clearly violated in selling it to KDOT. Will the courts agree?

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

Good try Tuschie, but no cigar.

Bozo and Tuschie, call up Bob Eye and get the lawsuit filed. But it won't be, because you two don't understand the law you are citing. There is no defect in the land transfers, or it would have been litigated long long ago.

You both should thank your lucky stars that E. Raymond Hall convinced his buddies in DC to hold onto this land, or it would have been sold back to the farmers in the county at the time. Of course E. Raymond Hall was a naturalist, he recognized the benefits of preserving natural area.....but he also conceived it as a place where recreational duck hunting, fishing, and other hunting and trapping. Not exactly "green" by your standards, I presume. He spent years working on this dream, for naught.

Regardless, the federal transfer laws, which have changed over time, were all scrupulously followed, and for the two of you to complain on this forum just make you both exactly like Tom Shewmon and Rush Limbaugh.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

"There is no defect in the land transfers, or it would have been litigated long long ago."

As long the wetlands are maintained, and Haskell and the general public have open access, there is really no reason to litigate. Once its destruction is actually set in motion, there will be a strong basis for litigation, and that litigation will happen.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

OMG - you must be smoking the same delusional stuff that Tuschie is! Wow - what an idle threat. The only legal requirements for Baker Univ were spelled out in the 30 yr quit claim deed. Baker Univ received a clear title with no strings attached in 1998. But if you want to go there - I am assuming you are implying that "selling" - actually "deeding" the land to KDOT is not in the interest of education? What do you think the visitor center is going to be used for? Please - hold your breath until you win that one!

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

that is complete insanity, and denial of the real legal world, bozo. And you know it. And it also ignores the fact that your position has no claim. You lie.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Boston - the scary/sad thing is, I do not believe BOZO does know that. He is in denial so deep that he is unable to comprehend truth and reality, even when it hits him up the side of the head.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Tuschie and Bozo - I think Missunderestimate has both of you nailed. Just because you believe it and shout it on the blog ad nauseum does not make it FACT. Baker Univ. obtained the property from GSA through the Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare, not the DOI and so the law that you so graciously copied for us is irrelevant. But go ahead and try telling us over and over because I can use a good laugh every so often!!! One other thing - Tuschie - you shot yourself in the foot by writing out the law because in your earlier "testimony" the land could only go to public schools - yet in the very first sentence it states it can be transferred to "local school authorities". By any definition I believe Baker Univ. would fit into this. Bozo - if either you or Tuschie knew what you were talking about I think I would choke. The process that the gov. used in transferring the property was called a 30 year quit claim deed from GSA. It was free of charge - it didn't even cost $1 as Tuschie keeps saying. The 30 yr was up in 1998 - that's 12 years ago. Baker Univ has a clear title so they can do ANYTHING with the land. For them to transfer title of 56 acres is not a violation any more than for any of the other landowners that have ROW that KDOT will negotiate for.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

And the law Tuschie repeatedly types for us was similar, but not the same law in place when earlier transfers from this land were made to the Township, the school district, KU, and KS wildlife. And I reiterate that without the intervention of E. Raymond Hall, all of the remaining land that people now refer to as the Baker wetlands would have been sold off in parcels to farmers, as all other excess BIA lands at the time were. Only because E. Raymond Hall had seen other "game preserves" and believed that Lawrence would benefit economically from a preserve that attracted hoards of hunters and fishermen, does the parcel of land known as the "Baker Wetlands" exist.

The earlier transfer of this larger parcel, which went to the federal wildlife department, was totally legal under the law then applicable.
.... You may choose to call the white man a devil, and call these land transfers immoral, but you can not call them illegal. And if they are immoral, we will need to transfer the land for SWJH, Broken Arrow elementary, Broken Arrow park, and the township fire station back to someone too. (Perhaps to the farmers whose land was purchased under threat of condemnation by the feds for Haskell's use years earlier, since they were the most recent legally recognized owners prior to BIA acquisition) .....

As a postscript, when Bozo signs over clear title to his house to Tuschie, I will accept his oft-volunteered assertions of white man's guilt on this issue as being genuine, but not before.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

So you want your pavement, and you'll screw Haskell to get it. And you'll go through long-winded rationalizations to get it. I get that.

But what else do you (and IdahoWinds) get out of it? Enquiring minds want to know.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

Pretty funny Bozo. You obviously don't know about my views on that road or transportation issues.

I just believe in truth in discussion about the topic. And although you may probably do believe it, I don't find this discussion about native American or Haskell "rights" to the "(you name it) Wetlands" to be particularly accurate or meaningful. This thread proves it.

One of your favorite words is "strawman" and I would suggest the same to this line of logic by you.

But if you want to label my suggestion of examining actual facts instead of opinion as "screwing Haskell" continue to do so. But that should demonstrate to you why most of this community perceives you as a wing-nut, and not a person with any intellectual gravitas, as your father was so perceived.

You are so much like Glenn Beck and Rush. And that is not a compliment.

Want to stop "screwing Haskell?" Give them the deed to your house.

Until then, you are just a white hypocrite.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

"You obviously don't know about my views on that road or transportation issues."

It's pretty clear. You want pavement, and you want it at Haskell's expense.

"I just believe in truth in discussion about the topic.'

And you follow that with this--

"Want to stop "screwing Haskell?" Give them the deed to your house.

Until then, you are just a white hypocrite."

That's quite a "discussion" you got going there.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Tuschie, I see you changed your statement from seeing "migrating geese" in a blog earlier in the week to "I don't see hardly any animals like the other side". That must mean you may have seen something other than geese? And how do you know those geese were migrating? They are here all year round. Maybe you were wrong the first time? My friend Harold visits the original wetlands almost twice weekly and lately he has been visiting the restoration site. I asked him what he saw the last time he was there. He said he was there Wed morning for an hour and walked on the Boardwalk, several mowed trails, and thru the yard back to the parking lot (Nov 3rd) and saw: 2 Great Blue Herons; 18 Canada Geese; 4 Gadwall; 2 Mallards; 2 Northern Harriers; 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk; 1 Cooper's Hawk; 2 Reds-tailed Hawks; 1 Amer. Kestrel; 18 N. Bobwhite; 1 Virginia Rail; 5 Killdeer; 2 Amer. Avocets; 3 Greater Yellowlegs; 1 Common Snipe; 1 Ring-billed Gull; 11 Mourning Doves; 1 Belted Kingfisher; 1 N. Flicker; 5 Bluejays; 3 Amer Crows; 6 Horned Larks; 8 E. Bluebirds; 2 Amer. Robins; 56 Eur. Starlings; 5 Amer. Tree Sparrows; 2 Chipping Sparrows; 60+ Savannah Sparrows; 2 LeConte's Sparrows; 1 Fox Sparrow; 3 Song Sparrows; 1 Lincoln's Sparrow; 1 Swamp Sparrow; 1 Harris' Sparrow; 3 White-crowned Sparrow; 4 Dark-eyed Junco; 250 Red-winged Blackbird; 7 Eastern Meadowlark; 30+ Western Meadowlarks; 350 Common Grackle; 16 Amer. Goldfinch. I believe that's 41 species - not too bad for 1 hour. So - Tuschie - if I was you...I would drop the false hope you cling onto that the restoration area doesn't have any wildlife there.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Quivira Trail - I'm curious, did/do you know either Ivan or Roger Boyd? It sounds like a pseudo-guilt trip you are trying to lay on the younger Dr. Boyd. But let's look at your assumptions. According to the younger Dr. Boyd's Wetland website (just Google Baker Wetlands) his father, Ivan, managed the wetlands from 1968 when Baker received the land until his death in a tragic accident while conducting a prescribed burn with his class in March 1982. A search of his obituary indicates he was 77 when he died. Not too bad to still be teaching and conducting prescribed burns! Very similar to Aldo Leopold (another story). But that would mean the elder Dr. Boyd managed the wetlands for almost 14 years all of which time the area was still drained. In fact, according to the website, the elder Dr. Boyd never believed they would ever be wetlands again (except for the 45 acres of untouched wet meadow) mainly because of Clinton Reservoir. Ivan's son Roger then became director in 1982 until present which is 28 years - about twice as long as his father. Baker Univ. was not involved in the SLT until 1985 - 3 years after the elder Dr. Boyd's death. It wasn't until the early 1990's (again the website) that the younger Dr. Boyd started to manipulate the drainage structures so they would quit draining the wetlands....and actually revert to wetlands again after around 140 years of cultivation. I think most people would see the loss of 56 acres to the SLT traded for 304 acres of more wetlands, 40ac of prairie, 16 acres of riparian habitat, thousands of dollars for equipment, and millions of dollars for a visitor center and an endowment to staff and manage the area into the future as an over-all triumph instead of causing his father to roll-over in his grave - more likely he would be doing cartwheels! Try putting your guilt trip on Haskell for not using the SLT to their advantage to benefit the school instead of bringing pity on their school as a hindrance to progress in this fine city.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

Idahowinds, you sound like a brainwashed homer, that's okay, I've dealt with them for over a decade now. I was in Baldwin City at my grandparents when the elder Boyd passed in that accident. My father attended Baker and graduated around the time Mr. Boyd attended Baker. What no one besides me has referenced here is the indigenous view of the wetlands. I've gone through many cycles of educating people for a decade now. The first peoples in this area were from the Dalton phase over 6000 years ago. Then the Pomona phase peoples were here almost a thousand years ago. The ancestors of the Caddo peoples were here, then the ancestors of the Kaw and Osage people were here. In historic times, the Kaw and Shawnee peoples lived in this area. Like other indigenous peoples in the Americas, these people had a profound sense of botany when it came to medicinal and consumption uses of plants. All of this predates anything done in a Euro-American classroom. Indian boarding schools are another subject no denying caucasian wants to acknowledge. Sorry, indigenous people acknowledge it. All Mr. Boyd does is dress his boy scouts up like us. In the early years of the federal Indian boarding school system, kids were gathered together without being immunized on these campuses where european diseases ran rampant. Indigenous kids back then died constantly due to white diseases at all of the many Indian boarding schools. Seen the cemetery at Carlisle in PA? at the Genoa Pawnee School in Nebraska, the historical markers admit that kids died and were buried all over that campus. It happended here and kids were dumped in the wetlands by the white overseers back then. As many of you rant without historical knowldege, what do you really know.... as I've witnessed and felt the need to fill in the blanks... nothing... so keep talking about nothing.

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

Tushkie, you express some great issues of history to be examined, and much which needs repeating, but you "way over-reach."

When you inaccurately can even quote the law, you blow your authenticity and authority. When you state the law inaccurately, you are a "giver of untruth." When you put all these issues into a blender and hit the "high-speed" button, you really do nothing but hurt your cause.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

misunderestimate, I have a copy of the land transfer map, the 20 acre parcels looked to be doled out following the public law decree of 20 acres. Why wasn't this public law decree followed with the wetlands transfer? Mr. Eye deals with environmental law, thta's why this whole land transfer thing hasn't been pursued further. If you read the last part about following the tenets of the transfer, I wouldn't think that destroying a wildlife refuge area and indigenous grave area would set well with a judge...would you? there's a stink test legally, and this definitely stinks of underhandedness.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

tushchie; Years ago, for purposes unrelated to the SLT, I happened to examine the land transfer documents involved in the purchase of these lands for BIA from farmers on behalf of Haskell.

I also examined the correspondence involved in the land transfers back to, the Lawrence School Board, the city and county, the township,to KU, and the state. I have also read the real federal laws that existed at the time, instead of the inaccurate one you regurgitate online, which was, quite frankly, non operative at the time. Go back and read the law as it existed at that time.....but you may have been too stupid to figure that out. ..... Lie all you want. These documents and laws are not deep secrets. Yet you spew so many mistruths.

You and Bozo are both either mis-informed, stupid, or liars. I will let you guys choose which. .... Mr Eye is a smart guy. And you know that. If anything was done illegally relative to these land transfers, he could and would easily file a law suit based on it.. Surely you are not suggesting Mr. Eye has insufficient legal ability to understand property law or land transfers. That is kind of lawyer #101. I do not think he would enjoy being characterized as that.

If he is only an "environmental" lawyer, could you file an action against him if he had represented you in a criminal case? I guess you are suggesting if he did that he is practicing as a fraud and should be sued himself?

Of course, that is BS. Land transfer issues are basic, and are quite within Mr. Eye's legal abilities. For you to suggest anything else is pretty much total BS and lies.

Which is pretty normal for both of you.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Oh Tuschie - WHAT IS YOUR POINT? Or do you have one? Trying to read your drivel and make any sense out of it is PAINFUL. I'm glad you didn't bother to tell us that you ever attended Baker Univ. - I am sure it is an embarrassment to the Univ to acknowledge that - at least they don't have to acknowledge that you graduated from there. There are several ways your information could be translated - 1) you are desperately trying to say you are connected to everything 2) somehow, magically, you are the only one in the region to have any legitimate knowledge about the past [I would trust KSWarpony's interpretation before yours]. 3) there has been a long parade of different tribes that lived in the area - so what? 4) there has been a long list of people named "Ford" that have lived in the area since 1854 but it is hardly relevant to completing K-10 around Lawrence 5) yes, there were American Indian children that died at Haskell in the early years 6) yes, there was a lot of persecution of those children 7)to your knowledge, none of them were "dumped into the wetlands" - correct? Or were you magically there in th 1890's. I assume you are just saying that because Mike Caron & Chuck Haines think they have had a lot of traction with that myth in the past? 8) If you had any factual evidence that Dr. Boyd dresses up "his scouts" to "look like us" - what is the point. Scouts do that everywhere - it is a sign of respect for Native Americans rather than ridicule, as you imply 9) You last point is taken, however. I think it was that you continue to ramble on about NOTHING of relevance in your posts.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

hating comes in many forms... I attended Baker also... my last name has nothing to do with settlers here which shows how much you draw at the proverbial strawman of nothing. You share the dismissive rascist tone of denial with indigenous history which is nothing new. All of the indigenous groups I mention were on this land way before you and your pointless highway and Mr. Boyd's sellout nature. Scouts are a disgrace in costume and you sound like the typical Chief Illiniwek defender.. oh well.. some people just don't know...

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Tuschie - I suggest you sit down and take several deep breaths. Try to get your pulse rate below 200. Maybe some meds will help. You are becoming ever more irrational. You are embarassing yourself. You missed my point - your last name does have nothing to do with completing K-10 on 32nd st - THAT WAS MY POINT! And neither does any argument about what Indians have lived here in the past or the fact that Section 18 was part of the Old Haskell Farm. USACOE, FHWA, KDOT, KSDW&P, & KSDWR don't care what has happened there in the past. They don't have to. So the real point here is that it doesn't matter how much you rant. The decisions were made according to NEPA guidelines in 2002 and 2008. You need to quit beating yourself up over things you had nothing to do with nor can have any hope of changing. AND your irrational tirades will certainly do nothing but cause others to write you off as delusional. Just as they have already written off Merrill and Bozo.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Tuschie - in regards to land transfers. Let us jump into our time machines and zoom back to 1968. The scenario is that BIA is going to get rid of the land they hold in Section 18 south of the Haskell Indian Junior College. They have no need for it. They no longer teach agriculture. There have been numerous 49ers out there and a series of serious accidents involving intoxicated young Indians. It is a concern to the administration. So BIA is going to get rid of it some how. They now decide that they can not legally transfer the 573 acres to anyone because of the size of the plot. What do you think should happen next? "Giving it back to Haskell" is not an option as they are still part of BIA. It must go off of the government ownership. What next? Try to explain to us, Tuschie (or anyone) how this could have played out in such a way that there would be a wetland to argue about today.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

Your point is quite clear. You want pavement, you want on the Haskell Wetlands, and you don't care what Haskell thinks about it. For you the only important issue if finding a plausible (to you) legal rationalization for getting what you want, at Haskell's expense.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

So if we think Tuschie and you are lying, the response is "we want pavement?"

If you knew me you would know that is a lie.

Why do you resort to FOXTV tactics?

Your father would not be pleased by your honesty of debate.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

I don't care who you are. Your posts here indicate quite clearly that you want pavement, and you want it to come at Haskell's expense.

If that's not what you want, it's you who have been dishonest here. Not me.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

And it's interesting that "property rights" has been one of the main vehicles used to create a legal fiction surrounding the seizure of Indian territories.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

That's extremely naive. In this area in particular, the Delaware and other tribes were very blatantly threatened and intimidated by so-called "market entrepreneurs" (including the first governor of Kansas) into selling their lands, usually for much less than market value. But these entrepreneurs got the deeds, which is all the legal fiction they needed to gain the property rights.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

The particular order in which that land was transferred doesn't change the fact that they were to a very large extent forced off their lands, but because there was a paper trail of the transfer of property rights, that somehow made it all OK.

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

Legal fiction?

Bozo? As others have suggested....why have you not deeded your house to Haskell? Isn't that the cure to the harm?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

Well, I'm the Official History Gods have given only you the One True History on US/Indian relations as well. Sadly, I haven't been thusly blessed.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

That should have read "Well, I'm sure the Official History Gods have given only you..."

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

ha ha. No, the legal gods have provided me the real world of the law, as opposed to that which you make up in your own brain as being just, without regard to others. The benefit is I have real case citations and court cases to defend my view. You do not.

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

Don't worry about Bozo.

This just proves his thesis that the US should have not dropped the atomic bomb on Japan, how racist the US was in bringing WWII to an earlier conclusion, instead of killing a few couple more million US servicemen.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

It's interesting that you feel the need to come to a totally unrelated thread to have an argument with yourself on that particular topic.

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

Unrelated? I would say a person's ability to speak with historic authenticity is related. Especially as it relates to historical notions of racism.

But Bozo, you are probably not honest enough to understand the direct comparison.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

You mischaracterized my arguments on that issue way back when. Why do you feel the need to do so here, on a completely unrelated thread?

And I'm still waiting for you to tell me who the Official History Gods are that make you so certain exactly what the the One True History is of that particular chapter (or any other, for that matter.) Do these Gods speaking only through you, or do you have brother oracles?

Boston_Corbett 4 years, 8 months ago

You misconstrue history, based on your understanding of racism in part. It is clear that you have view which are discordant to mainstream beliefs. This is fine, but they are clearly conjoined and are highly politicized.

There is a connection....you perceive yourself as a person devoid of "racism" and argue things from that perspective.. But you also are a white man with a deed to a house from native American land. You are a white man who benefited because people of your fathers' generation dropped the bomb to end the war, yet you want to reinvent history there.

Just because you are a privileged young man from Lawrence doesn't mean you can re-invent US, Kansas, or Lawrence history.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

It really is a pleasure having a conversation with you, Boston, because without it, I just wouldn't have the slightest idea what I think. Thanks for setting me straight.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

I really invite people to read the comment threads above between Bozo and myself.

Bozo obviously does not know about my work and support for wetlands and wetlands environs laws.

I do not buy into the meme of native american land theft. But I support the principal (not all the specifics) of wetlands laws preservation because of what they are and what they support....biological systems.

Because of this he does not like my factual observations about the issue, and wants to raise th false flag of native American land theft, I am "dishonest," he says. And that I want "pavement at the expense of Haskell, etc"

Well, he is the person who lies. What do the native Americans think about liars?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

My argument isn't about "wetlands." My argument is that that particular tract of land, which happen to be wetlands, is culturally and historically important to Haskell. It used to be part of the Haskell campus, and both its transfer to Baker, and Baker's intended sale of that land for something other than educational purposes violates both the spirit and the letter of the regulations governing such transfers.

Can lawyers find some legal rationalization to allow this highway to be built? Possibly so, but that's for the courts to determine.

But what doesn't take a lawyer or a rocket scientist to understand is that there are alternative routes for this highway, so anyone insisting on the 32nd street route must necessarily have no respect for what Haskell wants on land that it still feels rightly belongs to it.

If you reject that, you are, in fact, being dishonest.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

Bozo, its "cultural" relationship to Haskell was that it was totally owned and operated cropland, in the same sense of all cropland in the totality of Kansas.

It is difficult for you to argue that this tract has any meaningful relationship to Native American rights. It was only a tracts of land acquired, after white-man Congress and Lawrence economic boosters argued in succeeding to locate a Lawrence Haskell Indian Training Center in Lawrence

The purpose of the feds acquiring this land was to locate an training educational facility for native americans where "natural husbandry" was encouraged, i.e. farming. This was not a "holy" transfer to the native American "gods" or anything else.

After being owned and farmed (by the white men), the feds bought this land for the use of Haskell. Haskell farming was discontinued. The feds correctly started the transfer of these lands back to private people. In Lawrence, these actions were complicated by the white-man who wanted to create a fishing/hunting preserve, for Lawrence economic development.

If you believe this land needs to be "transferred" to anyone, it should be to the farmers who sold it. If you believe anything else, all the land, including yours, should be transferred back to the native americans. Your claim to your house, is the same as the farmers who sold their land to Haskell in the early party of the century.

If you believe that there is some special created sanctity of land which was occupied for just a decade of two,(for native american agricultural training, by the white man) I guess I understand your position, but disagree with your conclusion.

My issue has always been the biological systems of the wetlands.....which others have talked about with real knowledge, on this forum. but

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

Well, I'll give you this much. You've sure memorized what white people wanted and intended quite well. Too bad that's about all you know or want to know about it.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

The point is that Bozo knowingly lies, and invokes native American racism in his criticism of others.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

I finally have to agree with Bozo! His argument isn't about wetlands. I suspected this was true but then many Native Americans (Mike Caron especially) claim that it is about wetlands. It has been apparent for years that Bozo knew NOTHING about wetlands and so now I can quit trying to correct his ignorance, it is now obvious that has never and will never care to be informed. The puzzle that remains for me is how he can argue with a straight face or a clear conscious on the behalf of NA if he doesn't even understand what the argument is about? The mantra from Haskell students is "Save the Wetlands". That would make you think it was about wetlands as an ecological entity rather than the mantra "Save the historical and cultural property that just happens to be wetlands". Who knew? If only KDOT had been informed of this years ago in some comprehensible manner then KDOT wouldn't have to spend $10+ mill to mitigate for "destroying" the Baker Wetlands and this could be done by now! If you are not concerned about the wetlands then this makes it even easier - why do you care about a strip 150 yd wide by one mile long the cuts through property that is currently owned by Baker Univ. whether or not you are able to accept that? So what if the 573 acres is historically and culturally significant - More than 90% of it will still be just as it is today - just quieter due to the noise wall.

missunderestimate 4 years, 8 months ago

IdahoWinds just nailed it, from the ecological perspective.

Bozo and others are only into the political/racism issue, which is exactly my point.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

Just because I don't put the wetlands issue front and center doesn't mean I (and students at Haskell) don't think it's an important one. It's estimated that the Wakarusa wetlands once covered 17,000 acres. Restoring as much of that as possible is goal that should be pursued. But creating the tract of restored wetlands featured in this article still doesn't justify the destruction of the Haskell Wetlands.

And for you to attempt to claim some sort of moral higher ground simply because you prefer pavement over both the preservation of wetlands habitat and respect for Native American property and culture is beyond my comprehension.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

idahowinds, ignorance is addressed with aggression, comments about meds are pointless and simply a deflection ploy by people with weak denying arguments that are simply rehashed from the 1990's bunch of denialists. If you're speaking of the BROCKINGTON Report from the early EIS documents, this stuff is pure nonsense. No indigenous people interviewed and speculations by a white anthro outsider that no self respecting indigenous person would give information to be manipulated or misinterpreted in a fraudulent document anyway. Charles Bluejacket, Shawnee Indian operated a crossing at the southwest corner of the wetlands on the Oregon Trail which ran up the west side of the wetlands and through the Haskell campus. A Haskell alum and I followed and marked the trail with a book from the outskirts of Gardner towards the northwest. One of the comments I made that was removed previously years ago implied that Euro-American people have no regards for their own history. You're doing your best to prove that point correct...good job.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

misunderestimate, Palin as a subject header, nice. She's married to an Alaska Native man while they both speak out against indigenous subsistence rights in Alaska and let the daughter's son go on IHS healthcare while their baby daddy in law poses nude and the daughter dances...nice.... Palin shoots animals from helicopters..nice... It's only fitting that Mrs, Murkowski got the write-in support from Yupik and inupiat peoples against your clown avatar dimwit. As for the history land theft bit since you don't know, you will be told... Baker like a couple of other denominational colleges in Kansas was indirectly founded by Methodists whose first intention out here was to convert tribes like the Shawnee, Kaw, and Wyandotte peoples to Methodism, disrupt their cultures and steal their lands. maybe this is why I went to a tree of reconciliation ceremony some years ago at Baker with Kansas Wyandotte and Oklahoma Shawnee peoples present. The American Baptists stole lands from the Ottawa people in an 1862 treaty in section 5 and later the US Government paid for this theft in an ICC settlement in the late 1960's for theft of 20,000 acres of land from the Ottawa people that became Ottawa, KS, and the OU campus. The Moravian or Church of the Bretheren did the same thing to the Munsee or Christian Tribe of Indians between 1864 and 1900. The Presbyterians did the same thing with Iowa, Kickapoo, and Sac and Fox peoples with what was initially Highland College and what is now Highland CC. Without Indians there would be no churches in Kansas before the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. Churches were mostly the cultural and land parisites that pushed for land thefts for white christians and the removal of tribes to Oklahoma. Know you know you why we're angry and you have no leg to stand on.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Tuschie - AGAIN, what is your point? The land that Baker Univ sits on in Baldwin was legally obtained. The Wetlands were legally obtained. There is no land theft here! Just because you and Bozo believe it and scream it does not make it any more true. GOI

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

I'm sorry about the "meds" comment - I didn't know you'd be so sensitive about whether you had taken them lately or you were just up past your bed time. Seriously though, you really need to "preview" your tirades before you hit the "post" button. They hardly ever make any sense to the point of sometimes being incoherent! I have no idea how the Brockington report fits into the most recent blogs. The point of the Brockington Report was that the Old Haskell Farm, in his opinion, did not qualify as a Tribal Cultural Site as it was utilized by individual Indians rather than by organized tribes. To my knowledge, no one ever challenged that in the public comment periods of USACOE or FHWA. In regards to history accounts - which is most likely to stand the test of time oral history or written history. And BTW - who was the author of the book you were using to follow the Oregon trail? Was it written by an American Indian? I think you may have confused several points though. The "Bluejacket Crossing" was about 5-6 miles east of the Baker Wetlands. The Indians' name that operated the crossing in Sec 18 prior to Blandon was not Charles Bluejacket. You're doing your own good job of butchering history. Besides - none of this has any thing to do with the legal fact that Baker Univ. owns the property where K-10 will be completed - so GOI (get over it) !!!!

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 8 months ago

"Besides - none of this has any thing to do with the legal fact that Baker Univ. owns the property where K-10 will be completed - so GOI (get over it) !!!!"

Which to you means they can be paved over. Your only concern.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

But Bozo, you said yourself you didn't care about the wetlands. All you cared about was that it is open to visitation by Amer Indians and that the area is not destroyed. That has been the point of the EIS - make sure those two things continue to occur through the mitigation so it looks like you win after all!

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 7 months ago

Why, yes, I can just imagine how idyllic the visits to ten lanes of pavement and a gigantic "sound" wall" will be.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

Your world must be miserable. Never being able to see positive in ANYTHING. That is sad. It is unfortunate that you are not able to move to western KS - there is no development going on there. You would be very happy. And if you choose carefully you could find a historical, cultural Indian site that you could improve by what ever definition you want. But, unfortunately for you, staying here is only going to rip more of your heart out as the SLT paves over what apparently you think is the most sacred part of the Baker Wetlands!? Personally, I find that down by the dump is much more serene and peaceful. Ever been there?

gl0ck0wn3r 4 years, 8 months ago

Funny how whenever a story about forward movement on the SLT appears, it is immediately followed by a warm and fuzzy story about the awesome wetlands that reads almost like a visitor guide press release. Coincidence?

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

I'm glad that you were able to figure that out. That's exactly what it was. The point being that wetlands are going to be destroyed and the federal clean water act requires mitigation for that act. So, if it wasn't for the restoration project that the Boyds are doing there would be no completion of K-10. So if you want K-10 you should be glad the restoration is moving ahead.

gl0ck0wn3r 4 years, 8 months ago

Will there be a solar powered monorail?

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

No - its not disneyland. You have to walk on your own power. The plans for the visitor center indicate it will be cooled by geothermal and have solar panels and a wind generator.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 7 months ago

There's a rare bit of honesty from you-- the new wetlands mediation project is only being done to justify the destruction planned immediately to the east.

Mike Ford 4 years, 8 months ago

actually chucklehead, it was the bicenntennial book checked out from the public library in lawrence and yes the Bluejacket crossing came through the wetlands. Then WPO president Nick Luna and a person from the National Historic trails group within the US Park Service had their picture taken below the Wakarusa River bridge just north of the Meers farmstead in the LJWorld about seven years ago where the crossing was. I guess you're wrong and you're racist for implying that if the source was an indigenous author it was wrong. Nothing to do with meds.. just replying to the same nonsense I've heard for a decade and if there is no case on land transfer, why haven't the theives started their work yet? they must be afraid of something?

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

More nonsense - more delusion. The Bluejacket crossing was indeed 5.5 miles east of E 1500 rd - check your facts. There was indeed an indian crossing approximately 350 yards east of the Blandon Crossing but it was not the Bluejacket crossing. And the article you refer to was a ruse. The NPS gentleman knew no more where to look than Nick Luna or Chuck Haines. His suggestion of the wagons coming down stream from the south has absolutely no basis in fact and is probably physically impossible. He apparently was blowing smoke at the time as well as being on private property without permission (it does not belong to Baker U). And besides - I didn't think you ever believed anything that was printed in the LJW unless it is one of your LTE.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

...and so in conclusion - what do we know? This old prayer seems to be extremely fitting: "God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I can not change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference." When the trafficway opponents became organized back in the early 1990's this was all about whether or not K-10 could be completed down the existing ROW of 31st St. Their were many overtures made to the Administration at HINU. None of these were accepted and few were even considered. In my mind the real problem was that the Administration didn't represent the opponents anyway - there was never any scenario in which a compromise could ever be reached. Mainly because the parties involved weren't even communicating, let alone that each entity believed they had sole authority to make decisions. At that time the opponents were of three voices: "No More Pavement"; "Save the Wetlands"; "Not another Inch". Because of FHWA inability to reach any compromise, and the loss of a lawsuit, the project was abandoned and FHWA concluded "No Build". When KDOT returned with a new proposal - this time building it on ROW from a willing seller, things changed. The three heads of the same cause were still there but in addition was the voice of "Respect Native American Cultural & Spiritual Rights". From a historical perspective I think it was a masterful plan by Mike Rees, lead counsel at KDOT. Mr. Rees knew something that neither Tuschie or Bozo have the serenity to accept - that the property rights of Baker Univ. trump the claims of land theft. Baker President Dr. Lambert also knew several things- the younger Boyd was a reasonable man and that his father had already compromised with the county to get N1250 rd abandoned. Apparently Pres. Lambert was willing to let the younger Boyd propose a mitigation plan that could be negotiated with KDOT. It is possible that Dr. Boyd knew what he could or couldn't change and decided to go with compromise. Or it is also possible that he was simply greedy and saw "life-time employment" as Bozo claims. By KDOT allowing a portion of the mitigation to be performed this has given many of those that believed mitigation wouldn't work an opportunity to see that it does. What we have remaining are a few believers in "No more pavement" (Merrill & Quivira) and a few "Respect NA Cultural & Spiritual Rights" (Tuschie, Bozo, KCwarpony) or perhaps they are "Not another Inch? Hard to tell. ...to be continued.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 8 months ago

Part 2 - It appears that most of the "No pavers" have accepted that the time to protest has passed. I understand that for those that believe the land was illegally obtained by Baker Univ (or what ever villain you want) this issue is likely to never be resolved. They will forever believe they and their people have been wronged and nothing can change that. As far as I can tell if it wasn't for the Boyds, including the third generation - there would be NO wetlands to be fighting over. It would still be drained and cultivated just like the ground to the east and west (before restoration) of the current Baker Wetlands. Based on Boyd's Website (& the EIS) once the SLT is completed - the public will still have access to the Baker Wetlands and at more locations than present; the wetland acreage will be expanded by several hundred acres; there will be a visitor center that will educate thousands of kids a year about the value of wetlands - perhaps even about NA spirituality and the sanctity of wetlands to NA peoples. I think most of us can accept that nothing will ever get Tuschie and Bozo to see the "other side" mainly because we understand that to them there is only one side - it is only right or wrong (and we all know who is on which side). What I also accept is that belief and fact are not necessarily the same, and that BOTH can change. I also understand there is always two (or more) sides to a story. However, I intend to continue to stick with the facts - at least as how I understand them to currently exist.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 7 months ago

"I think most of us can accept that nothing will ever get Tuschie and Bozo to see the "other side" mainly because we understand that to them there is only one side - it is only right or wrong"

Oh, spare the sermonizing. For you there is only one "right way," and that's to make sure that pavement is placed where the lords of pavement deem it should be placed.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

Prior to the 1850's all floodplains in Eastern Kansas were wetlands. So yes both sides of the current Baker Wetlands were also wetlands before the settlement by white people. There are many types of wetlands. Just because Kansas wetlands look different does not mean they aren't wetland. Almost all wetlands in Kansas have been drained at some time in the past so for them to be a wetland today they have to have been manipulated by man in some way in order to hold water again. This does not diminish their ability to function the same as virgin, untouched wetlands...whatever that might be.

Mike Ford 4 years, 7 months ago

I was involved in the contacting of the tribes consultation part that all of the other parties tried to circumvent until the lawsuit by stan and thomasine ross made them have to do the job they should of done in the first place...contact all affected tribes in the scoping process, Inspite of many tribal statements against the road being submitted, the federal people took the rascist way out and ignored them. The white officials tried and succeeded in denigrating indigenous religion using essentially the same language of dismissal that was used when boarding schools started in the 1880's against indigenous religions. What none of them and probably you don't realize is that there were and are some 500 to 700 indigenous nations with diverse religious beliefs tied to the lands they came from or are still on. Physical natural sites are religious to us. Remember our ancestors were here before you or your ,buildings. The first amendment applies to us also in spite of the Lyng ruling of 1989 that was made in a rascist dismissive way. The Native American Religious Freedom Act of 1978 applies to us. Executive Order #13007 applies to us. I've prayed in my Choctaw language in the wetlands. I go to Wabaunsee County to pray there. Here's something for your dismissive tone to acknowledge: Sa Aba Inki ut hoke, Sa yakni ut hoke, sa chahta okla ut hoke, neshoba holitopa, issi holitopa, onsi holitopa, luksi holitopa, oka holitopa, iti holitopa, shutik holitopa, okla laua holitopa, amen. One last thing for thought, Idaho winds, I'm related by marriage to Marvin Schwilling who has a statue in his honor for his work at Cheyenne Bottoms. He trained Mr. Boyd many years ago. What would he think of the desecration Mr. Boyd is attempting?

tomatogrower 4 years, 7 months ago

So all of you who want the road built seem to also be the people who don't want wasteful government spending and are concerned about paying taxes. Yet, how much has the state and federal government spent on defending this route? How much could they have saved by just moving the route south of the Wakarusa? They complained about having to build a couple of bridges, but I'll bet they could have built 4 bridges for what they have spent on shoving it down our throats. Are these the real conservative values you all seem to espouse? This is an example of your fiscal responsibility?

Mike Ford 4 years, 7 months ago

tomatogrower, five years ago, the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation in Kansas did a ghost study side by side with the figures submitted for the 32nd street route and discovered that the numbers for south of the river had been inflated unexplainedly to make north of the river seem more financially responsible to the public. Nevermind the amount they stated in the first place wasn't accurate. It reminds me of all of the deal rigging on 19th century railroads in Kansas that were done to take Delaware, Kickapoo, and Osage lands for railroads.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

What everyone needs to understand is that the engineer was asked to look at ways the road could be built so that it would cost the same or less than the 32nd St alignment. The engineer used TX highway standards which are completely different than KS for a variety of reasons not the least of which is the type of winters we have which are harder on roads than in TX. He also used steeper banking in curves than KS guidelines and finally, among other infractions, he ignored the fact that the river approach on either end had to past thru a legal floodway. No fill can be added to the floodway in KS or TX but the engineer did. That eliminated the cost of an elevated highway of 1/2 mile on the West and about 3/4 mile on the East. This alone accounts for most of the cost difference. Nice try Prairie Band and Tuschie.

Mike Ford 4 years, 7 months ago

if it smells like theft, it's theft, explain that one away. transportation interests in eastern kansas have a long history to distance themselves from. I suggest idahowinds should read the End of Indian Kansas by Craig Miner and William Unrau. Every dirty trick used by land speculators, politicians, the Santa Fe, Lawrence, Leavenworth, & Galveston, Union Pacific Eastern Division, and Leavenworth Pawnee & Western railroads are currently being recycled. MAYBE idahowinds should understand the lies and theft in the history of this area concerning transportation and realize they're fighting an uphill battle. We know the history of white kansas settlement and the thefts involved, why don't they?

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

Tuschie - That's an interesting concept. Good luck pushing that up-hill. You smell theft...but then you smell theft, underhandedness, lies, cheating everywhere. It just comes easy for you, I guess. What I smell is Baker Univ saving your wetlands for you. Try giving them some credit sometime. For sure, it is difficult for them to work with you when you keep calling them cheats and thieves. Go figure.

Mike Ford 4 years, 7 months ago

the oregon california trail came up through the wetlands. Monette Terry, Oklahoma Cherokee Haskell alum got the markers put up on 31st street to mark the trial crossing. the state of kansas put up the signs marking the oregon trail crossing area on the west side of the wetlands after Ms. Terry lobbied them to do so. A crossing ford was under that bridge on the Wakarusa River. Wakarusa is an Algonquian and possibly Shawnee word, go figure.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

Unfortunately I must not have been very clear about my blog. I wasn't saying that the trail didn't cross the wetlands, I was saying that the Bluejacket Crossing was not on the wetlands - it was further east. There were AT LEAST three crossings on the Wakarusa. Perhaps you were also unaware that Baker had three Oregon/California trail marker signs on the wetlands 2-3 years before those on 31st Street. Go figure.

Mike Ford 4 years, 7 months ago

.

From left, Jere Krakow, Nick Luna and Chuck Haines stand on the northern bank of the Wakarusa River on the edge of the Baker Wetlands. Krakow, superintendent of the National Trails System, an agency within the National Park Service, scouted the site Friday where the Oregon Trail likely crossed the Wakarusa.

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

So what is your point? I didn't deny that this was in the paper nor did I deny that the trail crossed the Wakarusa somewhere around where they were standing. My point with Jere Krakow and Nick and Chuck was that they had no idea what or where they were looking. They also were assuming that the banks hadn't changed in the past 150 years. Doh!

IdahoWinds 4 years, 7 months ago

After 4 days and 122 blogs it finally comes to an end… we can move on to the next article that Fed Judge clears way for 32nd St. There were 132 posts on it overnight! Bozo and Tuschie take offense when they are called voices of the minority – or whatever, but the numbers do speak fairly loudly. There were a total of 22 “names” blogging 70 times in favor of completing K-10 on 32nd St. alignment. There were 4 “names” apparently neutral – at least not saying anything relevant one way or the other. And then we have only 8 “names” in the minority opinion of building the road south of the river with a total of 48 blogs, 85% of which were sent by Bozo and Tuschie. Next….!

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