Advertisement

Archive for Wednesday, January 6, 2010

LiveWell Lawrence announces plan to help residents eat better, move more

LiveWell Lawrence releases proposal to drive policy changes

More than 2,500 people do jumping jacks during Lawrence's first "World's Largest Community Workout" in July 2009 at Shenk Sports Complex, 23rd and Iowa streets. It's back by popular demand and will be Tuesday. Organizers hope to attract 4,000 participants this year.

More than 2,500 people do jumping jacks during Lawrence's first "World's Largest Community Workout" in July 2009 at Shenk Sports Complex, 23rd and Iowa streets. It's back by popular demand and will be Tuesday. Organizers hope to attract 4,000 participants this year.

January 6, 2010

Advertisement

LiveWell Lawrence announces plan to help residents eat better, move more

The coalition has $200,000 in Kansas Health Foundation funding and plans to award it to a group or groups who will help it achieve its goals. Enlarge video

LEARN MORE

LiveWell Lawrence will have two informational meetings about $200,000 in grant money that is available for its community health initiative.

The meetings will be at 4 p.m. Jan. 28 and noon Jan. 29. Both will be in the Lawrence Public Library auditorium, 707 Vt.

The meetings are mandatory for anyone who wants to apply for a grant.

For more information, contact Marilyn Hull, LiveWell Lawrence facilitator, at 843-8727.

The LiveWell Lawrence Coalition has released its plan to make it easier for residents to eat better and move more.

The coalition has $200,000 in Kansas Health Foundation funding and plans to award it to a group or groups who will help it achieve its goals.

Those goals:

• Making healthy foods more available and unhealthy foods less available in public venues such as schools, child care centers and city and county buildings.

• Encouraging county residents to produce and consume more local foods, and expand the number of places where local foods are available.

• Offering all children 30 minutes of quality physical activity during school hours, and 30 additional minutes outside of school hours.

• Designing all streets with safe access for all users: walkers, bicyclists, wheeled-device users, transit riders and drivers.

“We are looking for the community’s ingenuity and creativity on how to implement some of these goals,” said Marilyn Hull, facilitator for LiveWell Lawrence. “These are not things that are going to happen easily or quickly. These are big changes that have to occur.”

Hull said LiveWell Lawrence isn’t looking to provide funding for an exercise program that’s going to benefit 20 people. They are looking at rewarding changes in policy and systems that will affect thousands of people.

For example, she said, the city of Lawrence could adopt new nutrition guidelines for day care centers.

Another example would be to have an after-school fitness program offered at every public school.

And yet another example would be expanding the farmers’ market to other areas of town.

“We focused on four areas where we thought the community work would make the most difference in the lives of people,” Hull said.

LiveWell Lawrence’s ultimate goal is to reduce chronic diseases linked to poor eating and sedentary lifestyles.

According to research, about 50 percent of Lawrence’s adult population is overweight or obese.

“Good health is not achieved in clinical settings,” Hull said. “Instead, it happens in the places we live, work, learn and play — our everyday environments.”

LiveWell Lawrence began in 2008 when the Douglas County Community Foundation received a $300,000 grant from the Kansas Health Foundation. A steering committee of about a dozen people have been meeting since then.

Its first community event was the “world’s largest community workout” on July 8 when about 2,800 people turned out to do sit-ups, push-ups, jumping jacks and a half-mile run at Kansas University’s Shenk Recreational Sports Complex.

It also has held several public forums to seek the community’s input.

LiveWell Lawrence has made a list of 300 residents who are ready to help make a difference.

“We have a lot of everyday citizens who are just interested in health and wellness or have particular interests like bicycling or walking paths or local foods,” Hull said. “We are interested in getting them involved because a lot of times they have the energy and compassion to really drive community change in ways that are helpful to the professionals that do this for a living.”

Comments

TheStonesSuck 4 years, 11 months ago

Here's something that virtually every Lawrence resident could take advantage of- bike lanes! The bike lanes on 9th and 19th street are great. The problem is that there is not enough of them. Tennessee and Kentucky streets are both death traps for cyclists. As are 23rd, 6th, Iowa, and Mass in most places. How awesome would it be if we had an active cycling community? One in which Lawrence residents/KU students could bike not only for fun and exercise but use it as their main source of transportation? Studies have linked many health issues facing americans with our tendency to drive an automobile on even the shortest of trips (those less than a mile). In my opinion, nothing but positive things would result from Lawrence establishing a well recognized and visible bike lane infrastructure.

Marilyn Hull 4 years, 11 months ago

LiveWell's fourth goal is all about making it easier for people to walk and bike to everyday destinations like work, school, and shopping.

thepianoman 4 years, 11 months ago

I'd never bike in Lawrence. The whole town, as far as biking, is a death trap.

Marilyn Hull 4 years, 11 months ago

For the record, the Kansas Health Foundation is a private foundation--no tax dollars involved. Most steering committee members are from the health, wellness and community education professions.

Sherry Warren 4 years, 11 months ago

Marilyn, from searching around it looks like LiveWell Lawrence is part of the LDCHD... true? How can one learn more about its programs and getting involved?

Commenting has been disabled for this item.