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Archive for Saturday, December 4, 2010

FDA panel moves toward expanding use of stomach bands

December 4, 2010

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— About 12 million more obese Americans could soon qualify for surgery to implant a small, flexible stomach band designed to help them lose weight by dramatically limiting their food intake.

The Food and Drug Administration will make a final decision on the Lap-Band in the coming months.

The device from Allergan Inc. is currently implanted in roughly 100,000 people each year and usually helps patients lose 50 pounds or more. Under federal guidelines, it has been limited to patients who are morbidly obese.

On Friday, a panel of FDA advisers recommended expanding use of the device to include patients who are less obese. The panel voted 8-2 that the benefits of broader approval outweighed the risks.

If approved for wider use, the Lap-Band could be available to patients like Angela Denson, a 37-year-old Indianapolis woman who wants to lose 80 or 85 pounds. She said she has struggled with obesity since she started having children 20 years ago.

“I’ve tried diet pills. I’ve tried Weight Watchers ... all different types of diet plans,” she said.

Denson is not quite obese enough for the surgery under the current standards, but she still wants to pursue the procedure to ward off future health problems and feel better.

But experts stress that the Lap-Band cannot stop deeply ingrained behavior that drives people to overeat. And the high cost of the procedure will remain a barrier for many potential patients.

More than a third of all American adults are obese. About 15 million of them meet criteria for gastric banding surgery under existing guidelines, which say a person should have a body mass index of 40 or higher, or a BMI of 35 or higher if the person suffers from a weight-related medical problem such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

If adopted, the proposal would lower the Lap-Band requirement to a BMI of 35 or higher, or as low as 30 with one related health problem.

Doing so would increase the number of eligible patients to 27 million, according to federal health data.

Comments

Cait McKnelly 4 years ago

As long as insurance companies continue to label bariatric surgery of any kind "plastic surgery" and uncovered this will make no real dent in the obesity epidemic in this country. Insurers would far rather pay for the diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiac care that are the long term effects of obesity rather than do anything to actually keep people, y'know, "healthy".

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