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Archive for Sunday, August 22, 2010

Iran says peaceful intent behind reactor

August 22, 2010

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An Iranian security guard directs media Saturday at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, with the reactor building seen in the background, just outside the southern city of Bushehr, Iran.

An Iranian security guard directs media Saturday at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, with the reactor building seen in the background, just outside the southern city of Bushehr, Iran.

— Trucks rumbled into Iran’s first reactor Saturday to begin loading tons of uranium fuel in a long-delayed startup touted by officials as both a symbol of the country’s peaceful intentions to produce nuclear energy as well as a triumph over Western pressure to rein in its nuclear ambitions.

The Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant will be internationally supervised, including a pledge by Russia to safeguard it against materials being diverted for any possible use in creating nuclear weapons. Iran’s agreement to allow the oversight was a rare compromise by the Islamic state over its atomic program.

Western powers have cautiously accepted the deal as a way to keep spent nuclear fuel from crossing over to any military use. They say it illustrates their primary struggle: to block Iran’s drive to create material that could be used for nuclear weapons and not its pursuit of peaceful nuclear power.

Iran has long declared it has a right like other nations to produce nuclear energy. The country’s nuclear chief described the startup as a “symbol of Iranian resistance and patience.”

“Despite all pressure, sanctions and hardships imposed by Western nations, we are now witnessing the startup of the largest symbol of Iran’s peaceful nuclear activities,” Ali Akbar Salehi told reporters inside the plant with its cream-colored dome overlooking the Persian Gulf in southern Iran.

In several significant ways, the Bushehr plant stands apart from the showdowns over Iranian uranium enrichment, a process that can be used both to produce nuclear energy or nuclear weapons. It also could offer a possible test run for proposals to ease the impasse.

The Russian agreement to control the supply of nuclear fuel at Bushehr eased opposition by Washington and allies. Bushehr’s operations are not covered by U.N. sanctions imposed after Iran refused to stop uranium enrichment. And last week, State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said the Russian oversight at Bushehr is the “very model” offered Tehran under a U.N.-drafted plan unveiled last year.

That proposal — so far snubbed by Iran — called for Iran to halt uranium enrichment and get its supplies of reactor-ready material from abroad.

Western leaders fear Iran’s enrichment labs could one day churn out weapons-grade material. Iran claims it has no interest in nuclear arms, but refuses to give up the right to make its own fuel.

Iran has some of the world’s biggest oil reserves, but lacks refinery capacity to meet domestic demand and must repurchase fuel on international markets. Nuclear power is seen as both a goal to meet power needs and an important technological achievement for the Islamic government.

The French Foreign Ministry said the Russian deal shows Iran does not need to enrich uranium to benefit from civilian nuclear power.

“This clearly shows that the sanctions do not aim to deprive Iran of its right to develop nuclear energy for peaceful uses,” said the French statement.

After years of delays in completing the plant, Moscow now claims that the project is essential to persuading Iran to cooperate with international efforts to ensure it does not develop the bomb.

Iran has said that monitors from the U.N. nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, will have access to the fuel shipments at Bushehr, about 745 miles south of Tehran. Spent fuel contains plutonium, which can be used to make atomic weapons.

U.N. nuclear inspectors were on hand Saturday as the first truckloads of fuel were taken from a storage site to a “pool” inside the reactor. Over the next two weeks, 163 fuel assemblies — equal to 80 tons of uranium fuel — will be moved inside the building and then into the reactor core.

It will be another two months before the 1,000-megawatt light-water reactor — heavily guarded by soldiers and anti-aircraft batteries — is pumping electricity to Iranian cities.

Comments

beatrice 3 years, 8 months ago

The Russians helped them, so perhaps we need to go to war with Russia.

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Centerville 3 years, 8 months ago

"What right do western leaders have to intervene?" You forgot the /sarcasm tag.

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Liberty_One 3 years, 8 months ago

"Western leaders fear Iran’s enrichment labs could one day churn out weapons-grade material."

Whether they fear it or not, what right do western leaders have to intervene?

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 8 months ago

If we had a president that wasn't frenetically "fundamentally transforming" America, maybe he'd have a spare minute or two to assess this gathering storm.

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Snodgrass 3 years, 8 months ago

Democrats have hated Nuclear Reactors since the China Syndrome. Nuclear Reactors kill. Even though Iran has one of the largest oil reserves on the planet, they need Nuclear Reactors for energy? Their manufacturing industry is very busy you know. Where is the outcry from Democrats? Are they not afraid of the Iran Syndrome? What about the Iranian babies?

Why is Obama and his Democrats not upset with the Iran Syndrome?

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