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Archive for Monday, April 5, 2010

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Tips to tune out negative energy

April 5, 2010

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Swallow that pill

Many people struggle with gagging when they try to take medicine. Here are tips from pharmacists on getting pills down easier:

• Take a sip of water first. Especially if your mouth is dry, drink some water just before putting a pill in your mouth. Then take a few additional gulps to swallow.

• Place pills in the center of your tongue. If you gag easily, try putting the pill on the tip of your tongue rather than further back in your mouth. If a pill is oval, make sure to point it length-wise toward your throat so you don’t swallow it sideways.

• Don’t throw your head back. Instead, tilt it forward with your chin toward your chest. That motion should help move a pill to the back of your throat.

• Try a straw ... The suction created by a straw may help push a pill down your throat.

McClatchy Newspapers

Lately we have noticed an increase in the number of clients experiencing extremely difficult times. We have also noticed an increase in the number of clients who report family members having more difficult times. Although this awareness is strictly anecdotal, there is plenty of environmental stress in our universe that could easily be taking a toll on our spirit causing a variety of mental health issues. One of the most troubling environmental stressors is the apparent divide that exists in our country over a variety of hot-button issues from health care to war.We have also noticed an increase in the number of clients who report family members having more difficult times. Although this awareness is strictly anecdotal, there is plenty of environmental stress in our universe that could easily be taking a toll on our spirit causing a variety of mental health issues. One of the most troubling environmental stressors is the apparent divide that exists in our country over a variety of hot-button issues from health care to war.

We are inundated through our modern media with images of extreme anger and hatred. We seem at such odds with each other that we find ourselves polarized. This apparent polarization is causing many of us to feel very vulnerable and isolated. This vulnerability may increase our reactivity leading to anger, depression, anxiety and a myriad of unhealthy coping strategies.

It is not sufficient to place the current angst on recent political developments and the resulting political divide. We have been experiencing a rise in global stress with economic crises, wars, earthquakes, and other major events over the past few years. A few of our clients have described a sense of being “numb” to it all.

Unfortunately, the relentlessness of stressors can be so overwhelming that a state of “numb” can be the minds way to cope by shutting off. It may seem as if you are numb; however, you are still absorbing the stress in your brain and the rest of your body.

Current conditions on earth represent a unique challenge to us as individuals and collectively. Here are some ideas on how to remain safe and protect your emotional health during these difficult energy times.

• Be clear about what is in our control. You cannot control external events; however, you can manage your response to them.

• You don’t have to read or listen to news reports. Trust us; if there is something you absolutely need to know someone will get in touch with you. If you are bothered by bad news, avoid it.

• Become more of an observer of events and your reactions. Don’t simply go along with the experience as if you are on a slope going downhill. Slow down and take inventory of your physical and mental activity before reacting.

• Remind yourself daily about those things you are grateful for. Share your gratitude with those close to you.

• No matter how much you disagree with someone; developing an, us versus them, mentality is not useful. This is not a time for further separation consciousness. As we hear often, we can disagree, without being disagreeable.

• Avoid automatic negative thoughts like; black and white thinking, mind reading, focusing on negatives, blaming, assuming that if you feel then it must be true, etc.

• Meditation and conscious breathing exercises are critical to staying in the present and avoiding being swept up in drama.

• Good books for these troubling times are Michael Brown’s “The Presence Process” and “Alchemy of the Heart” or Pema Chodron’s “When Things Fall Apart” and “Comfortable With Uncertainty.”

Ed Bloch, LSCSW, and Jena Bloch, LCMFT, are directors of the Life Enrichment Center in Lawrence.

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