Sports

Sports

KU athletes set academic record

January 28, 2009

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Kansas University’s student-athletes set an athletic department fall semester record with a combined 2.99 grade point average, it was announced Tuesday.

Ten of KU’s 16 teams posted better than a 3.0 grade point average last semester. KU’s women’s golf team led the way with a new team record 3.46 grade-point average.

The Jayhawk volleyball team posted a 3.35 grade-point average, while the swimming and diving team produced a 3.32 GPA. Other sports posting better than a combined 3.0 GPA were tennis (3.18), soccer (3.17), rowing (3.14), women’s track and field (3.11), softball (3.10), women’s basketball (3.04), and men’s golf (3.04).

Other team GPAs included men’s cross country (2.98), men’s track and field (2.97), women’s cross country (2.90O), baseball (2.85), spirit squad (2.84), men’s basketball (2.63) and football (2.62).

For the second straight semester 53 percent of KU’s student-athletes (282 total) were named to the athletic director’s Honor Roll by achieving a 3.0 grade-point average or better. Thirty-nine student-athletes posted a perfect 4.0 GPA last fall.

Comments

cthulhu_4_president 6 years, 3 months ago

To anyone who constantly says that student atheletes are atheletes first and students second, and do not deserve to be at a University because they're just "jocks" I have two suggesstions that should be followed in the order given:1) Read the article.2) Wake up!!Student atheletes show every semester how dedicated they are, both academically and atheletically. They continue to record a higher GPA and a lower drop-out rate than the undergraduate sutdent-body. Congratulations, guys (and gals).

hail2oldku 6 years, 3 months ago

Not to mention that these young men and women graduate at a higher rate than the general student population (and that takes into account those that leave early for professional careers).Of course athletics is meaningless and exclusionary.

rachaelisacancer 6 years, 3 months ago

Yeah, the fact that cross country runners and football players don't have to put any effort in their work (if they have to do it at all) doesn't have any effect on that GPA at all.2.99. Not exactly fridge-worthy.

cthulhu_4_president 6 years, 3 months ago

Rachel, you are sadly, pathetically, misinformed. You obviously didn't take my suggestion number 2. Get your head out of the rumor mill and take a minute to find out if you're spewing the truth (let me save you some suspense: you're not.)

rachaelisacancer 6 years, 3 months ago

You're right, cthulhu. Experience means nothing. Your statements are the absolute truth we've all been searching for. Once again, 2.99 isn't anything to write home about.

cthulhu_4_president 6 years, 3 months ago

Rachel, you can call me biased, but I actually do have experience. I work with these kids almost every day in my second job, and I see firsthand how hard they work. I began my position with much skepticism bordering on cynacism with regards to collegiate atheletics, and seeing how hard they actually work has caused me to do a 180 on my views. I never said experience was nothing. The only reason I chose to speak on this issue was BECAUSE of my experience (4 years of it). Now, please tell me why your "facts" are the absolute truth. Here they are if you don't remember: ----------"Yeah, the fact that cross country runners and football players don't have to put any effort in their work (if they have to do it at all) doesn't have any effect on that GPA at all.2.99. Not exactly fridge-worthy.------------And as for the 2.99 comment, it is fridge-worthy if you are an student with the following schedule:6:00-8:00 weights8:00-9:00 workout9:00- 1:00 class2:00- 5:00 weights or practice5:00-10:00 meetings with staff/tutors/free timeNot to mention that some students choose to have a job (somehow) on top of all that, and the fact that some atheletes come from substandard school systems where they were basically pushed through with insufficient academic skills so that they could remain eligible to play, and that 2.99 becomes very fridge worthy. These are just FACTS that I have gained through years of EXPERIENCE.

DonnieDarko 6 years, 3 months ago

cthulhu_4_president: Maybe they could push that collective GPA over 3.0 if they were working with someone who can spell "suggestions", "athletes" and "cynicism".That being said, I agree with your posts. :-)

cthulhu_4_president 6 years, 3 months ago

Donnie: Guilty as charged. Good thing I'm not an English, tutor, though! I'm a science guy. We dun't kneed to now how to spelll, rite?

rachaelisacancer 6 years, 3 months ago

ct- So I guess with the fact that I worked with these kids for three years and had a completely different experience than you (i.e instead of being met with hard-working, time-stressed individuals trying to succeed I was met with only a handful of individuals who didn't think someone else should be doing the work for them in return for their athletic "greatness"), my experience cancels out your experience. Higher education isn't measured in how grueling your schedule is, it's measured in how you prioritize and manage that schedule and accomplish the things that matter (the education) in the meantime. You quote the schedule, but don't take into consideration the leeway athletes are given with regard to it. Missed classes, late assignments, etc. When Johnny "non-athlete" has a similar schedule that doesn't include playing ball, the professors give little consideration to how Johnny's schedule might make it hard for him to complete his homework. To add to his disadvantage, there aren't any coaches talking to Johnny's professors after class about how he deserves any leeway. When all the excuses are gone - we're still left looking at a 2.99 GPA. And it still sucks. I'm not hating on athletes on either an individual or collective basis. I'm just not going to pat anyone on the back for that kind of mediocre "success." I think anyone who does is foolish and will regret it when that guy who never received better than a D on a history paper (that someone else practically wrote and proofread for him) will be teaching your kid in history class.

KU_cynic 6 years, 3 months ago

I applaud those athletes among all sports who earned good grades, and those teams with good team GPAs (way to go, women's golf!).That said, average GPAs at KU are about 3.2, so the "all athletes" average of 2.99 is significantly lower than for other students.The football team and men's basketball team averages of 2.62 and 2.63 are shameful. Yes, football QB Todd Reesing has a high GPA according to press reports, as does basketball center Cole Aldrich. All the more shame on their teammates who are earning such dismal GPAs. I can only hope that football players' GPAs will go up in the spring semester as they will be "out-of-season." The fact that the basketball players' GPAs were so dismally low in their mostly out-of-season semester is alarming. This is a team with lots of freshman taking relatively easy introductory courses; this is the best they can do with all the resources devoted to coddling them?

Confrontation 6 years, 3 months ago

I wonder how much of this 2.99 GPA can be attributed to work actually done by the athlete, rather than his/her tutor, girlfriend, etc.?

hail2oldku 6 years, 3 months ago

KU_cynic (Anonymous) says… That said, average GPAs at KU are about 3.2, so the “all athletes” average of 2.99 is significantly lower than for other students.-------------------------------------------------------------------------Please site your source for this "statistic" because the flunk out rate of the general student population is much higher percentage wise than that of the student athlete."The football team and men's basketball team averages of 2.62 and 2.63 are shameful. Yes, football QB Todd Reesing has a high GPA according to press reports, as does basketball center Cole Aldrich. All the more shame on their teammates who are earning such dismal GPAs."All the more shame on those students that flunk out from the general population if your GPA is correct.

rachaelisacancer 6 years, 3 months ago

hail2oldku - Are you aware that it's nearly impossible for an athlete to flunk out? Note my earlier comment regarding the fact that professors don't take into consideration any factors related to a non-student athlete's performance in class. But yes, all the more shame on anyone who flunks out.

hail2oldku 6 years, 3 months ago

rachel yes I am aware that it is difficult for an athlete to flunk out of whatever school they might be attending. Even those that aren't particularly "cut-out" for school are steered towards majors that allow them to experience enough success in the classroom to maintain their eligibility. The point that I was attempting to make though is that there are plenty of "students" athlete or otherwise that maybe aren't the best prepared to be up on the hill. My apologies for inadequately conveying that message.

Kryptenx 6 years, 3 months ago

Scratch 3.0, I'd have a 4.0 if I didn't have to work to pay my way through school and had 5 hours a day to be tutored by some of the best staff available. This doesn't prove anything against being an athlete first, student second. Note that I have nothing against collegiate sports, I just don't think this proves anything about the academic performace of athletes except that they have great tutors.

rachaelisacancer 6 years, 3 months ago

Well on that note hail2oldku, I agree with you completely. The standards just keep getting lower and lower - in high school and higher education.

KU_cynic 6 years, 3 months ago

hail2oldku:Regarding the 3.2 GPA I cited. You are correct in one regard: the figure I cited -- based on internal documents I have seen -- was for graduates, not for all students regardless of progress to graduation. Given that the 5-year attrition rate for students who start KU is somewhere slightly north of 30% -- and presumably many of these students have poor GPAs, the approximately 3.2 GPA earned by graduates is probably higher than the unconditonal GPA given across all KU students.That said, I would bet that the athlete non-degree-earning percentage is somewhere around 20%. Also, non-athletes do not benefit from the intensive academic counseling, tutoring, and other coddling offered to athletes. Finally, and most importantly, football is where the big problem is -- given the large number of players and the low average GPA they earn, many of them in some of the fluffiest academic programs on campus.

kmat 6 years, 3 months ago

thank you Kryptenx!! I worked my butt off to be able to go to school, paid for it all myself (finally knocked out the last of the student loans just a couple years ago). I never had tutors. I rarely slept. Lived on cr*p food for years because I couldn't afford anything beyond Aldi ramen noodles (many of these athletes are fed too). Lived in the worst housing in the student ghetto, managed to still have a social life and graduated with a much higher GPA than what these athletes have. And that was back in the day when you had to go to library and look things up in books (no computers in the library then) and wrote my papers on a typewriter (no spell check or grammer check to help me out - god how I hated that IBM Selectric). These students are lucky now because technology makes it much easier for them.So many of these athletes (in football and BBall) are getting easy degrees too.If they are getting scholarships because of their athletic abilities, then they should be getting great grades. They're getting a free education because of their athletic skills, yet many of them have no respect for that scholarship. There are lots of hard working kids that can't shoot hoops but would kill for the chance these players get.

samrockchalkiam 6 years, 3 months ago

Let's not forget that the athletic programs provide a HUGE amount of income to the University of Kansas... Thus allowing quality instructors to receive a quality wage so that ALL students (athlete or not) receive a quality education. How distinguished would your University of Kansas degree be if not for the year-in year-out excellence of KU athletics over the last several decades? You might as well have attended Mizzou!!!

jonas_opines 6 years, 3 months ago

Pardon me. I don't actually know any student athletes so I can't evaluate their study habits. Can I still have a strong opinion anyway?

KU_cynic 6 years, 3 months ago

samrockchalkiam writes: "Let's not forget that the athletic programs provide a HUGE amount of income to the University of Kansas… Thus allowing quality instructors to receive a quality wage so that ALL students (athlete or not) receive a quality education. "I disagree with this statement. For one, KUAC collects a lot of money because of athletic success, and uses the money primarily to pay coaches more, to pay ADs more, and to pay for Taj Mahal facilities . . . and yes to give scholarships to athletes and pay academic support staff to keep them academically eligible.KUAC does not pay a net dividend back to the academic programs at KU. Furthermore, I can personally attest that KU professors are not paid better -- on average -- than professors at Mizzou.Here's my suggestion going forward: for every $1 that KUAC collects -- from donors, ticket sales, broadcast rights, Big XII revenue sharing, shoe and apparel deals with Adidas, and so forth -- 25 cents go to the general university budget to support non-athletic academic programs. If we're going to be partners in KU's athletic success, let's be real partners.

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