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Archive for Tuesday, April 28, 2009

NASCAR won’t make safety changes

Edwards’ crash raises questions about race security

Carl Edwards’ car leaves a trail of debris after it went airborne and hit the catch fencing on the final lap of the Aaron’s 499 on Sunday in Talladega, Ala. Despite the crash injuring several fans, NASCAR said it was satisfied with its current safety standards.

Carl Edwards’ car leaves a trail of debris after it went airborne and hit the catch fencing on the final lap of the Aaron’s 499 on Sunday in Talladega, Ala. Despite the crash injuring several fans, NASCAR said it was satisfied with its current safety standards.

April 28, 2009

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— Despite injuries to fans from flying debris, NASCAR is satisfied with its safety standards, saying the fence at Talladega Superspeedway did what it was supposed to do — keep Carl Edwards’ car out of the grandstands.

In a spectacular last-lap accident, Edwards’ car sailed upside-down into the frontstretch fence, which bowed but held, before the battered vehicle returned to the track. Blake Bobbitt, one of seven injured by debris, remained hospitalized Monday with a broken jaw.

“One of our primary goals over the years is to build a retaining fence that keeps the cars and parts and pieces out of the spectator areas. Nothing is bullet-proof,” NASCAR spokesman Jim Hunter said Monday. “The retaining fence did what it’s supposed to do. There was some debris that went into the grandstand, that fortunately did not invoke serious injury. If there is something we come up with as we analyze this accident ... we’ll make it as safe as we humanly can.”

The frightening ending marred what was easily NASCAR’s best race of the season. There were 57 lead changes among 25 different drivers and a nail-biting last-lap charge from Edwards and Brad Keselowski, who teamed together to run down Ryan Newman and Dale Earnhardt Jr.

NASCAR vice president Robin Pemberton acknowledged the fine line between creating exciting racing and keeping the competitors safe.

“It’s tough to balance out,” he said. “Our series is 22 different race tracks ... with speeds from 100 mph to well over 200 mph, and not every driver likes every race track that we run on. That’s part of our season, and that’s part of what makes it work.”

Comments

lionheart72661 4 years, 11 months ago

That's racin' baby! Nascar fans know what it's all about and the risks involved by both driver and fan. Especially at Talladega the race notorious for the "BIG ONE". Had it not been for the fence as stated in the article it would have been worse. I really don't think any fan was upset or at least they shouldn't because like it or not, take a poll and ask this question, "Other than seeing your favorite driver win what did you come to see"? My guess they will say a crash. NO! NASCAR fans do not want to see anyone hurt but the crashes can be spectacular just like Carl Edwards crash was. And by him walking, no, jogging away to cross the finish line tells you exactly how safe NASCAR really is.. NASCAR is an awesome sport.

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