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Archive for Monday, May 7, 2007

Disappearing bees

Insect deaths spur fears

A colony of honeybees works at the United States Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md.  An unknown pathogen is pushing the industrious honeybee to the precipice of disaster, and scientists are scurrying to determine the cause. Early results of a study point toward some kind of disease or parasite.

A colony of honeybees works at the United States Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. An unknown pathogen is pushing the industrious honeybee to the precipice of disaster, and scientists are scurrying to determine the cause. Early results of a study point toward some kind of disease or parasite.

May 7, 2007

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Jeff Pettis, the top bee scientist at the USDA's Bee Research Laboratory, is working to track down the mysterious killer that is threatening honeybees. About one-third of the human diet comes from insect-pollinated plants, and honeybees are responsible for handling 80 percent of their pollination, USDA says.

Jeff Pettis, the top bee scientist at the USDA's Bee Research Laboratory, is working to track down the mysterious killer that is threatening honeybees. About one-third of the human diet comes from insect-pollinated plants, and honeybees are responsible for handling 80 percent of their pollination, USDA says.

— Unless someone or something stops it soon, the mysterious killer that is wiping out many of the nation's honeybees could have a devastating effect on America's dinner plate, perhaps even reducing us to a glorified bread-and-water diet.

Honeybees don't just make honey; they pollinate more than 90 of the tastiest flowering crops we have.

Among them: apples, nuts, avocados, soybeans, asparagus, broccoli, celery, squash and cucumbers. And lots of the really sweet and tart stuff, too, including citrus fruit, peaches, kiwi, cherries, blueberries, cranberries, strawberries, cantaloupe and other melons.

In fact, about one-third of the human diet comes from insect-pollinated plants, and the honeybee is responsible for 80 percent of that pollination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Even cattle, which feed on alfalfa, depend on bees. So if the collapse worsens, we could end up being "stuck with grains and water," said Kevin Hackett, the national program leader for USDA's bee and pollination program.

"This is the biggest general threat to our food supply," Hackett said.

While not all scientists foresee a food crisis, noting that large-scale bee die-offs have happened before, this one seems particularly baffling and alarming.

Colony Collapse Disorder

U.S. beekeepers in the past few months have lost one-quarter of their colonies - or about five times the normal winter losses - because of what scientists have dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder. The problem started in November and seems to have spread to 27 states, with similar collapses reported in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.

Scientists are struggling to figure out what is killing the honeybees, and early results of a key study point to some kind of disease or parasite.

Even before this disorder struck, America's honeybees were in trouble. Their numbers were steadily shrinking, because their genes do not equip them to fight poisons and disease very well, and because their gregarious nature exposes them to ailments that afflict thousands of their close cousins.

"Quite frankly, the question is whether the bees can weather this perfect storm," Hackett said. "Do they have the resilience to bounce back? We'll know probably by the end of the summer."

Experts from Brazil and Europe have joined in the detective work at the USDA's bee lab in suburban Washington. In recent weeks, Hackett briefed Vice President Cheney's office on the problem. Congress has held hearings on the matter.

"This crisis threatens to wipe out production of crops dependent on bees for pollination," Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said in a statement.

A congressional study said honeybees add about $15 billion a year in value to our food supply.

Of the 17,000 species of bees that scientists know about, "honeybees are, for many reasons, the pollinator of choice for most North American crops," a National Academy of Sciences study said last year. They pollinate many types of plants, repeatedly visit the same plant, and recruit other honeybees to visit, too.

Pulitzer Prize-winning insect biologist E.O. Wilson of Harvard said the honeybee is nature's "workhorse - and we took it for granted."

"We've hung our own future on a thread," Wilson, author of the book "The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth," told The Associated Press.

Beginning this past fall, beekeepers would open up their hives and find no workers, just newborn bees and the queen. Unlike past bee die-offs, where dead bees would be found near the hive, this time they just disappeared. The die-off takes just one to three weeks.

Top suspects

USDA's top bee scientist, Jeff Pettis, who is coordinating the detective work on this die-off, has more suspected causes than time, people and money to look into them.

The top suspects are a parasite, an unknown virus, some kind of bacteria, pesticides, or a one-two combination of the top four, with one weakening the honeybee and the second killing it.

An experiment with some devastated hives makes pesticides seem less likely. The parasite hypothesis has history and some new findings to give it a boost: A mite practically wiped out the wild honeybee in the U.S. in the 1990s. And another new one-celled parasitic fungus was found last week in a tiny sample of dead bees.

However, Pettis and others said that while the parasite nosema ceranae may be a factor, it cannot be the sole cause. The fungus has been seen before, sometimes in colonies that were healthy.

Even though experts this year gave what's happening a new name and think this is a new type of die-off, it may have happened before.

University of Montana bee expert Jerry Bromenshenk said he doesn't think a food crisis is looming. He cited die-offs in the 1960s and 1970s that sound somewhat the same.

There were reports of something like this in the United States in spots in 2004, Pettis said. And Germany had something similar in 2004, said Peter Neumann, co-chairman of a 17-country European research group studying the problem.

"The problem is that everyone wants a simple answer," Pettis said. "And it may not be a simple answer."

Comments

pelliott 6 years, 11 months ago

While I am not freaking out, taking the information not to be concerned because someone's boss, neither whom I know says, hey don't worry, is not the research track I think I will mosey,. But thank you. I do think stressing out and worrying about the multitude of all the possibly alarming information is not going to be helpful, especially since so much of it is about stress and it's harmful effects. I am grateful that we do continue the recieve "the bad news" if it was all about attitude and keepig the morale of the people up we would lose the free press, it is precious. if we recieve correct information, there may be things we can do.

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gr 6 years, 11 months ago

Ohhh, the sky is falling.

You are just denying the FACTS! (mind you, I don't need to specify any). It's the cell phones and they are going to wipe out the human race.........

You surely don't think things go through a natural cycle, do you?

;-)

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6 years, 11 months ago

Erm...I was just chastised by my boss for being such an alarmist. Apparently, she's read up on the subject quite a bit and insists that this die-off is part of a natural cycle for the bee population. This was happening long before cell phones existed. All the die-offs appear to be happening on large, corporate unnatural bee farms. They see their bees dissapearing and blow the "Everybody Panic" whistle. Even if cell phones are killing bees, there are other pollinators out there that would likely step up to the plate and keep all those plants in reproduction. And I'm not saying "F@#k the bees" here, but maybe we should take a cue from my boss and not freak out just yet.

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gr 6 years, 11 months ago

"But here's a question: If the American public had to give up cell phones or starve, which do you think we'd choose?"

Most definitely, cell phones would stay!

Alright! Pick something we don't like, associate the most exotic thing with it, and then we have a political agenda = global wa.... that is, global cellphones killing bees!

We must preserve the bees or life as we know it will cease to exist. Whole plant species will die out. Deserts will enlarge. Massive starvations will occur. Cell phones is causing the bee's destruction. (Never mind no one knows for sure, but it's a FACT now - why can't you accept it attitude!) We must eliminate cell phones! We can sell cell phone credits for those who really want to use them anyway. Let's create new branches of government to monitor cell phone usage. Pass legislation to restrict their usage. We can create a whole agenda for school kids with a bee dying next to a cell phone.

This is so exciting. Now we can criticize everyone who doesn't believe it's a verified fact, demean them when they ask for some evidence we are causing bees to die from cell phone usage, say we don't need anymore proof, just become a bunch of bozos. There were bees; cell phones increased, now there are less bees.

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6 years, 11 months ago

I know this sounds a little off-kilter but I've just read an article speculating that it's cell phone towers and the signals they generate that are disorienting the bees and causing them to die off by the millions. The studies cited are vague so I'd appreciate any more info on the subject. But here's a question: If the American public had to give up cell phones or starve, which do you think we'd choose?

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Emily Hadley 6 years, 11 months ago

I have seen several study results that show that cell phone signals cause this exact problem. After placing a cell phone near a hive, the worker bees refused to return to it. While they couldn't say whether it was a perceived threat, disorientation, or an intolerance of the signal, the results were quite clear.

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