Posts tagged with City Hall

Another urgent care medical clinic slated for Sixth Street; big announcements from Free State Festival; items of note from City Commission elections

If turkey-on-pita or that wonderfully catchy Spangles jingle was medicine for your body, you’re still out of luck in Lawrence. But soon you will be able to go see a doctor in the Sixth Street location that formerly housed the Spangles restaurant. (And, you can always ask the doctor to sing the jingle. You never know.)

Plans have been filed at Lawrence City Hall for MedExpress to locate in the former Spangles building at 3420 W. Sixth St. If you remember, the fast-food restaurant closed down in late 2013. MedExpress is a West Virgina-based walk-in health clinic that treats everything from broken bones, cuts and scrapes, colds and flus, and a host of other nonlife-threatening ailments.

According to its website, the walk-in clinics are open seven days a week from 8 a.m to 8 p.m. The company has locations in seven states, but it looks like the Lawrence clinic will be its first in Kansas.

It certainly won’t be the first to start the trend of walk-in health clinics coming to Lawrence. West Lawrence residents, I don’t know what you have been doing — but perhaps we can talk in private later — but doctors certainly have been interested in serving you lately. Just a couple of weeks ago we reported that another walk-in clinic company — XpressWellness Urgent Care — had filed plans to build near the corner of Sixth and Folks Road. That’s just a couple of blocks away from this site. Interestingly, Lawrence developer Doug Compton played a hand in both projects. XpressWellness is going into the Bauer Farm development that Compton is a part of, and the paperwork for MedExpress shows that Compton’s First Management now owns the Spangles building.

No word yet on when MedExpress plans to open. The site will undergo a significant renovation. For some reason, it appears the medical office will not be keeping all the 1950s diner-style neon that exists at the Spangles buildings. Plans call for most of the existing building to be demolished. A new structure that is about 2,000 square feet bigger will be built. All told, the clinic will be about 5,000 square feet.


In other news and notes from around town:


• This news is just in: For those of you who didn’t get enough funk in the recently completed election season, one of the masters of funk will be performing a live concert in Lawrence this summer as part of the Free State Festival. The Lawrence Arts Center announced this morning that George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic will be a headliner of the festival, which runs June 22-28.

Noted comedian Bobcat Goldthwait also will be in town for the festival. He’ll be screening a documentary that he directed about comedian Barry Crimmins. Look for more information about the complete festival lineup and more details about showtimes soon.


• My french fry habits alone put me much closer to Bill Clinton than George Clinton, so you should find it as no surprise that I’m better versed on politics than funk. Even though I suspect there are many of you sick of the political season, we should do a quick wrap-up of some items from last night’s City Commission elections. Here are some things I think we learned:

— It was an odd year for money in Lawrence politics. The top three vote winners in the election were the candidates who raised the least amount of money. Leslie Soden, the top vote-winner, raised just less than $7,000 for the entire campaign, according to the most recent filings. The top fundraiser, Stan Rasmussen, raised just more than $25,000. He finished fifth in the six candidate field. The second-highest fundraiser, Bob Schumm, finished sixth. Couple this with the fact that supporters of the police headquarters sales tax greatly outspent opponents in November but still lost. Perhaps the role of money is changing in local politics. Perhaps social media is making it easier to run grassroots campaigns. Perhaps we just caught voters in a particular mood. Likely, it is a bit of all three.

— Any money that even looks like it may have touched the Koch brothers, Americans for Prosperity or other such conservative causes is poison to the touch in Lawrence. That seems to be the most likely explanation for why Rasmussen fell from second-place in the March primary to fifth place in the general election. Rasmussen had to deal with a controversy in the final week of the campaign as some voters expressed concern about $4,500 in donations that he took — and then later returned — from a prominent southeast Kansas family involved in conservative political causes. Rasmussen tried to explain that the money from the Crossland family came to him because he was a classmate with the elder Crossland in Leadership Kansas, not because the two shared political philosophies. For what it is worth, several people have come forward and said Rasmussen really isn’t a conservative in the ilk of Crossland. But Lawrence voters, it appears, take no chances on that front.

— This may be the last April election we have. One of the items that got a bit of talk in political circles last night is whether the Kansas Legislature will approve a law that would move the city and school board elections to even numbered years in November. County Clerk Jamie Shew told me he thinks the bill has a real chance of approval. City and school elections would still be nonpartisan but they would be on the ballot with partisan races such as governor and presidential races. Now that the campaigning is done, I’m going to look at that bill more, and I’ll report back. The implication could be large though. For one, some members of the City Commission will have to have their terms adjusted, if elections move to even numbered years. The bigger implication, though, may be how it changes the voter mix in Lawrence. Generally, KU students don’t come out to vote in City Commission elections. Generally, they do for presidential elections. If there are City Commission names on the ballot, will they vote in that race as well? It has the potential to be a game-changer.

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City estimates it may cost hundreds of thousands of dollars per year to keep concealed weapons out of city buildings

It appears the city soon will have to buy hundreds thousands of dollars worth of security measures. Either that, or the city will have to learn to live with a new state law that would allow concealed-carry permit holders to bring firearms into City Hall and other city buildings.

City commissioners at their Tuesday evening meeting will consider formally asking the Kansas Attorney General for an exemption from the new state law until Jan. 1, 2014. The state law — approved by the legislature and signed by the governor this session — essentially contains an automatic one-year exemption period for local governments. The city also may be able to get three additional one-year exemptions, although that is less certain.

The law no longer allows city or county buildings to be posted with the "no gun" signs that make it illegal for anyone, including concealed-carry permit holders, to bring a concealed weapon into the buildings. Under the new law, governments can only post those signs if the buildings have adequate security measures, such as metal detectors and security officers.

Lawrence city officials have begun calculating the cost to purchase and staff such metal detectors. A memo from City Attorney Toni Wheeler estimates it will cost about $5,000 for each metal detector, plus at least $42,000 a year for a single police officer to staff the metal detector—and the Lawrence Police Department, Wheeler wrote, believes two officers may be necessary for each detector. That would place the annual operating costs for the program at more than $84,000 for each building with a detector. And the cost may be even greater, because the personnel numbers represent starting salaries and don’t factor in benefit costs or other costs to equip a police officer.

Wheeler says at least three city buildings — City Hall, Lawrence Municipal Court and the public access area of the Police Department’s Investigations and Training Center — all warrant consideration for security systems. Beyond those three, city commissioners also would have to decide whether recreation centers and other city offices need the security measures.

New security costs for the city are expected to be addressed in the City Manager’s recommended 2014 budget, which is scheduled to be released in July. The costs could add up. If the city decided to include recreation centers in the program, there would be a total of nine buildings to equip and staff. At a minimum of $42,000 per building, that's almost $400,000 a year, plus the cost of the metal detectors. At $84,000 per building — which would be the case if two officers are required — it would be more than $750,000 a year.

But say you wanted to have security measures in place for every city-owned building that currently prohibits concealed firearms. The city currently has 47 buildings listed in its administrative policy, which means it would cost $3.9 million to provide a two-member security detail at every location. That, of course, is not going to happen. It probably would be a bit odd to have a metal detector at the city’s Landscape Shop or the Wastewater Treatment Plant, for example. Those places probably will become buildings where concealed-carry permit holders can have a weapon.

It will be interesting to see how city commissioners react to the new legislation. The previous City Commission sent a letter to the legislature objecting to the bill while it was under consideration. Whether the city’s objections rise to the level of spending more than a half-million dollars on security each year, I don’t know. The city already spends some money on security: a police officer attends each Lawrence City Commission meeting, and a bailiff is employed by the Lawrence Municipal Court.

If the city gets serious about installing metal detectors, there will be quite a few items to discuss. It probably would require the public entrances at City Hall to be changed significantly, since there are three ways for the public to enter City Hall. The city also could have a discussion about whether security officers — rather than fully sworn police officers — would be appropriate to staff the metal detectors. That may reduce the personnel cost for a security program.

And then there are city buildings such as the Lawrence Public Library and the Lawrence Arts Center that attract large crowds on a regular basis. How would they be secured and staffed?

Of course, the city always could have the discussion of whether any harm would come from allowing licensed individuals to carry a weapon in city buildings. According to the Kansas Attorney General’s office, it already is legal for concealed-carry permit holders to carry a weapon on various pieces of city property. Every city-owned park, for example, is a place where concealed-carry permit holders are entitled to have a weapon. “Parks, parking lots and other open public property" are no longer able to be restricted through signs, according to the Attorney General’s Web site. That didn’t always use to be the case, but the law was changed, I believe, during the 2010 legislative session.

City commissioners won’t be the only ones that get to have this fun. Douglas County also will have to go through the same exercise with its buildings, although it already has a metal detector for the Judicial and Law Enforcement Center. Public schools won’t have to install metal detectors under the new law. School officials can continue to post the "no gun" signs on school buildings, which will make it illegal for concealed-carry permit holders to bring a weapon into the building.

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