Entries from blogs tagged with “Tale of the Tait”

Has the fog lifted around KU football?

Kansas defensive coordinator Clint Bowen will take over as interim head coach until a replacement for Charlie Weis is found.

Kansas defensive coordinator Clint Bowen will take over as interim head coach until a replacement for Charlie Weis is found. by Nick Krug

It's a risky proposition to make too much of an introductory press conference, but the one that went down at the KU football complex today was at least enough different than all the others that came before to make me wonder if this day will go down as a turning point for Kansas football.

KU defensive coordinator Clint Bowen was introduced as the interim head coach this morning in Mrkonic Auditorium, and you could tell in 2 seconds what the moment meant to him.

Bowen was equal parts emotional, entertaining, witty and serious during the 20 minutes he spoke to the media, and he left many in the room believing that, at least for the next nine weeks, KU football was in pretty good hands.

Bowen's team — and make no mistake about it, this is Bowen's team for the rest of the 2014 season — will play tough, smart, energetic football and they'll have fun doing it. They'll represent KU the way Bowen has since he was a young boy sneaking into games at Memorial Stadium to watch some of his childhood idols, and Bowen will give everything he has to the program during his audition for the real deal. If he wins at all, he'll have a great chance at getting the interim tag removed. If not, well, he'll rest easy knowing he got his shot and gave it all he had.

Maybe that's what KU needs right now — a guy like Bowen, who will vow not to rest until things get better. Charlie Weis worked hard. And KU fans should forever be thankful for that, regardless of how things went on the field. But he wasn't a Kansas guy. KU didn't mean to Weis what it means to Bowen, and the same can be said about Turner Gill as well, save for the working hard part.

When Mark Mangino was forced out after one of the most successful stints in KU football history after the 2009 season, the Jayhawks paid a heavy price for the administration making the wrong move. Mangino did not deserve to be dismissed and, if you're one that believes in karma, it's easy to say that struggles and shellackings of the past four-plus seasons have been exactly that.

Maybe KU football was a little bit cursed. Maybe the Curse of the Mangino was to Kansas what the Curse of the Bambino was to the Boston Red Sox. But, instead of having to wait 86 years for the fog to be lifted, maybe Kansas only had to wait five.

Even if Bowen doesn't win and even if he's not the next full-time head coach at Kansas, it's possible that what he does during the next nine weeks will be enough to put the KU football train back on the right track.

In some ways, it seems like that's already happened. There's a different vibe around the building. Doors that were closed are now open. A larger portion of practice will be open to the media and the access to the players and coaches will be greater.

Beyond that, Bowen said he wanted to give the program back to the KU football family and emphasized that all former players are welcome in the building and at practice, no questions asked.

Those are all good first steps. Now all Bowen has to do is make the product on the field match the mood in the building and the vibe of the people close to the program. Only then will people entertain the idea that things might finally be different.

Reply

Let the search begin: KU football set to look for yet another head football coach

Kansas University director of athletics Sheahon Zenger, left, watches from the sideline next to deputy athletics director Sean Lester during the final minutes on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas University director of athletics Sheahon Zenger, left, watches from the sideline next to deputy athletics director Sean Lester during the final minutes on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

With Charlie Weis officially out as the Kansas University head coach after a little over two seasons in which the Jayhawks struggled to a 6-22 record, it's time to turn our attention to yet another coaching search, the program's third since 2009.

During the past two searches, bigger names and hot candidates dominated the days and weeks leading up to the hires of Weis and Turner Gill before him.

KU was oh-so-close to hiring Jim Harbaugh before former athletic director Lew Perkins handed Gill the job. And, when Perkins' successor, Sheahon Zenger, hit the trail to find Gill's replacement, Zenger criss-crossed the country and talked with dozens of candidates, known and unknown, before settling on Weis.

Don't expect the same type of high-profile names to dominate this search. In fact, don't be surprised if this one has a significant KU flare to it, both in the form of several of the top candidates to replace Weis having ties to Kansas, and, in the form of Zenger using all of his Kansas football resources, from current staff members, both in the administration and on the coaching staff, to Jayhawk legends, a la John Hadl, and former Jayhawks, like Darrell Stuckey and Banks Floodman.

That's not to say Zenger won't reach out and at least talk to some of the hotter up-and-coming coaches out there — particularly younger guys with great energy — but all signs point to the initial list being packed with names very familiar to KU fans.

With that in mind, here's our first stab at a list of possible Weis replacements. If you're looking for the Chris Petersens, Kevin Sumlins and Jim Harbaughs of the world, you might be better served to follow a coaching search at a different school.

The Strong Contenders:

• DAVID BEATY, 43, Texas A&M University wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Made $359,500 in 2013

Why it makes sense: A Texas native and former high school coach in the Lone Star State, Beaty's ties to recruiting in Texas are as good as any coach in America and he's worked under and learned from some big-time coaches, including former KU coach Mark Mangino and current A&M coach Kevin Sumlin. His previous stints at Kansas (2008-09 and 2011) made him very familiar with what it takes to succeed at Kansas and his relationships with several current members of the KU staff would present an opportunity for Kansas to maintain some stability while making a transition at the top.

Why it might not happen: Beaty's name will come up elsewhere, with the open job at SMU potentially being the biggest competitor for his services. It's possible that he'd like his first stab at being the head coach to be at a place where winning is more manageable than it is right now at Kansas in the ultra-tough Big 12 Conference.

• ED WARINNER, 53, Ohio State University co-offensive coordinator and offensive line coach
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Made $370,800 in 2013

Why it makes sense: Warinner is ready. After working for Mark Mangino (Kansas), Brian Kelly (Notre Dame) and Urban Meyer (Ohio State) at his past three stops, the Strasburg, Ohio, native who, in 2012, was named by Rivals.com as one of the nation's 20 hottest assistants, is ready to take a stab at running his own program. In addition, a return to Kansas likely would energize a fan base that associates Warinner with KU's recent glory days led by Todd Reesing and KU's high-powered offense.

Why it might not happen: Although he's worked at some big-time programs and for some big-time head coaches, Warinner does not have head coaching experience and some believe that could hurt him given the magnitude of the rebuilding project at KU.

• JOHN REAGAN, 43, KU offensive coordinator
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: $250,000-$275,000 per year

Why it makes sense: It's only a matter of time before Reagan becomes a head coach and there are many people out there who believe part of his return to KU was with that in mind. Well versed in running the spread offense that dominates college football and mentored by a couple of incredibly successful coaches (former KU coach Mark Mangino and Rice's David Baliffe), Reagan has been around winning, knows what it takes at Kansas and has strong recruiting ties in Texas.

Why it might not happen: A lack of head coaching experience could hurt given the timing of this hire and, with KU's offense struggling so far this season — even though blame for that goes well beyond Reagan — naming Reagan the head coach could be a tougher sell than it would have been if the Jayhawks were flying high and lighting up scoreboards.

• CLINT BOWEN, 42, KU defensive coordinator
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: $200,000

Why it makes sense: There are few people on the planet who care as much about this program as Bowen, who grew up cheering for the Jayhawks, later played safety at Memorial Stadium and has coached at KU under four different head coaches. There's no question that he'd be willing to put the time, effort and energy into rebuilding the program and his familiarity with the Big 12 would be huge. The fact that he inherited the interim tag for the rest of the season could be viewed as a first step in an audition for the real thing.

Why it might not happen: No head coaching experience hurts and Bowen's still a little young for such a position. There's some belief that his turn in the head coach's office at KU might still be a hire away.

The Under-The-Radar Guys:

• TIM BECK, 48, Nebraska offensive coordinator
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Made $700,000 in 2013

Why it makes sense: Beck’s Nebraska offense ranks fifth in the country with 594.3 yards per game. When Ed Warinner was brought back to Kansas by Mark Mangino to run a spread offense, Tim Beck, then the wide receivers coach for Mangino, played a key role in helping Warinner to install it because Beck had more experience with the offense. He worked two years as a graduate assistant under Bill Snyder, so he has known the Kansas landscape for a long time. He grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, a famous coaching cradle on the opposite side of the state line from Mangino. Beck knows offense, knows Kansas and knows the Big 12. He also knows how to bring a football program back from the depths. In his first assignment as a head coach, at Saguaro High in Scottsdale, Arizona, Beck inherited a program that had gone 5-43 in the previous five years. In his third year at Saguaro, the school won the state title and his record at the school was 23-4.

Why it might not happen: Beck’s only head-coaching experience has come at the high school level. He does not have high name recognition with the average KU football fan, so his teams will have to draw crowds the old-fashioned way, by steadily improving and playing competitive football, even in losses.

• ERIC KIESAU, 41, KU wide receivers coach
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Made $400,004 in 2013 at Washington, likely makes between $150,000 and $200,000 at KU.

Why it makes sense: Although he is in just his first season with the Jayhawks, Kiesau's past experience make him a viable candidate for just about any opening in the country. His time at offensive coordinator at Colorado and Washington make him familiar with two very important regions — Big 12 and Pac-12 country — and his track record of developing top-notch wide receivers everywhere he's been speaks for itself. Kiesau, who by all accounts is as humble as they come, is highly intelligent, loves to study the game and knows how to motivate his athletes to perform at their peak ability.

Why it might not happen: One season at Kansas — under Weis, no less — might not have enough juice behind it to get him the job. Had he still been the offensive coordinator at Washington or Colorado, Kiesau would likely be a sought-after commodity for several openings. But does his handful of months in Kansas as a position coach position him well enough for a jump to the top of the ladder?

The Forget-Me-Not Guys:

• DAVE DOEREN, 42, North Carolina State University head coach
Record at school: 3-9 in first season, 4-1 this season
Current salary: $2.55 million

Why it makes sense: Doeren spent time at KU under Mangino and grew up in Kansas City. He knows what it takes to win at Kansas and he understands the culture. Was a huge player in recruiting a good chunk of KU’s 2007 Orange Bowl team and also has been praised by many as one of the bright, young defensive minds in the game based on his highly successful stint as Wisconsin’s co-defensive coordinator.

Why it might not happen: Because it won't.

• JIM LEAVITT, 57, Linebackers coach San Francisco 49ers
Record at school: 95-57 in 13 seasons at South Florida
Current salary: Not available

Why it makes sense: Leavitt and Zenger are close, having spent time at Kansas State and South Florida together and Zenger has long been a fan of Leavitt's toughness and ability to build a program. With the future of 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh on unstable ground, Leavitt could be looking to make a move sooner rather than later.

Why it might not happen: Dismissed from USF for improper treatment of players, Leavitt's past may be too closely tied to Mangino's for the KU administration to pull the trigger. It's also probably worth noting that Leavitt played his college football and started his coaching career at Missouri.

The What-If-They-Look-Somewhere-Else guys:

• JIM HARBAUGH, 50, Head coach San Francisco 49ers
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: $5 million per season

Why it makes sense: Depending upon what you believe, Harbaugh was this close to becoming KU's coach before the Jayhawks hired Turner Gill. Things fell apart at the last minute and he moved on to San Francisco, where, despite making an appearance in the 2013 Super Bowl, Harbaugh and the 49ers are no longer in such bliss. Disagreements exist between the head coach and front office over Harbaugh's decisions and the way the team is being run and there are plenty who believe that Harbaugh will not return to the Bay Area after this season. Beyond that, a big selling point last team was the ability to return his wife and family to the Kansas City area, where his wife grew up. Maybe the timing is right this time?

Why it might not happen: All of the rumors and speculation out there surrounding how close Harbaugh came to being hired the last time could be a major distraction and it's possible that even if he were interested the fit just would not seem right. In addition, there's always the Michigan angle and there are web sites out there that already are tracking Harbaugh Watch and the former Wolverine quarterback's potential return to his alma mater.

• CHAD MORRIS, 46, Clemson University offensive coordinator
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Made $1.3 million in 2013

Why it makes sense: Clemson's offenses have been one of the most explosive attacks in the country under Morris, who took over in 2011 after one season as the offensive coordinator at Tulsa. Before that, Morris coached high school football in Texas for 15 seasons, including a stint at Lake Travis High, which produced former Jayhawk great Todd Reesing. The ties to Texas and his college success make him as good a candidate as exists for just about any job in the country. The pluses beyond that include his age, energy and huger to prove himself as a head coach.

Why it might not happen: Morris entered 2013 as the highest paid college football assistant in the country and there is talk that the Jayhawks are not looking to pay nearly as much as they have with the past two guys this time around. Would Morris take the same money he makes now to take over the risky position of being the KU head coach or would he wait for a better, higher-paying opportunity?

• BUTCH DAVIS, 62, Former NFL and college football coach
Record at school: N/A
Current salary: Not available

Why it makes sense: With strong ties to important KU recruiting territories of Oklahoma and Texas, Davis would bring instant credibility and a big name to the position. His track record — college head coach at Miami (Florida) and North Carolina and NFL head coach with Cleveland — gives him more experience than anybody on this list and his time prior to becoming a head coach was spent at the high school and college ranks in Big 12 country. Davis' name surfaced briefly during each of the past two searches at Kansas, so maybe the third time would be the charm?

Why it might not happen: It's possible that the Oklahoma native just might not be interested. He's been out of the coaching spotlight since 2010 and, at 62, may be on the older side for what KU needs and is looking for.

Reply

Keeping Stats: Where KU football ranks nationally heading into Big 12 play

Kansas head coach Charlie Weis watches the video board after a late fourth-quarter touchdown by Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas head coach Charlie Weis watches the video board after a late fourth-quarter touchdown by Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

The Kansas University football team has navigated its way through the non-conference portion of its schedule — some moments good, some moments bad — and is now headed into Big 12 play for the rest of the season.

With that in mind, let's take a quick look at where the Jayhawks rank nationally in a few dozen different statistical categories.

Keep in mind that, because of their Week 1 bye, the Jayhawks have played just three games while much of the rest of the country already has played four games. That fact impacts most categories in at least some small way and is worth remembering.

I was surprised to see that KU has nearly just as many decent rankings on the offensive side of the ball as on defense, though not all of them are the most critical stats. Overall, KU currently ranks in the Top 50 (of 125 FBS teams) in three offensive categories and six defensive categories.

Here's a look at where the 2-1 Jayhawks stand in the most popular categories on offense defense, special teams and miscellaneous.

Kansas opens Big 12 play at 3 p.m. Saturday against 1-2 Texas at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas running back De'Andre Mann finds a hole against Duke during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas running back De'Andre Mann finds a hole against Duke during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

OFFENSE --->

Total offense – Tied for 90th (374.3 ypg)

Scoring offense – Tied for 107th (20.3 ppg)

Rushing offense – 41st (200.3 ypg)

Passing offense – 106th (174 ypg)

Completion percentage – 99th .552 (48-for-87)

3rd-down conversion percentage – 96th .353 (18-for-51)

4th-down conversion percentage – 101st .250 (1-for-4)

First downs offense – 118th (52 1st downs)

Fumbles lost – Tied for 1st (0)

Interceptions thrown – Tied for 59th (3)

Red zone offense – Tied for 97th .750 (6-for-8)

Sacks allowed – Tied for 66th (2 spg)

Tackles for loss allowed – Tied for 57th (5.3 per game)

Team passing efficiency – 92nd (117.6 rating; Oregon ranks first at 211.3)

Turnovers lost – Tied for 18th (3)

After beating Central Michigan lineman Ramadan Ahmeti (77) around the edge, Kansas senior Michael Reynolds (55) forces CMU quarterback Cooper Rush (10) to fumble during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

After beating Central Michigan lineman Ramadan Ahmeti (77) around the edge, Kansas senior Michael Reynolds (55) forces CMU quarterback Cooper Rush (10) to fumble during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

DEFENSE --->

Total defense – Tied for 78th (403.7 ypg)

Rushing defense – 92nd (185.3 ypg)

Scoring defense – 81st (26.3 ppg)

3rd-down conversion defense – 36th .326 (14-for-43)

4th-down conversion defense – 110th .800 (4-for-5)

First downs defense – Tied for 20th (55 opponent 1st downs)

Fumbles recovered – Tied for 58th (2)

Passes intercepted – Tied for 32nd (4)

Passing yards allowed – Tied for 49th (218.3)

Passing yards per completion – 88th (10.88)

Red zone defense – Tied for 33rd .750 (6-for-8)

Team passing efficiency defense – 79th (130.4; Oregon State ranks first at 67.02)

Team sacks – Tied for 95th (1.33 spg)

Team tackles for loss – Tied for 56th (6 per game)

Turnovers gained – Tied for 47th (6)

KU senior JaCorey Shepherd (24) makes a move for good yards on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

KU senior JaCorey Shepherd (24) makes a move for good yards on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Richard Gwin

SPECIAL TEAMS --->

Blocked kicks – None

Blocked kicks allowed – Tied for 84th (1)

Blocked punts – None

Blocked punts allowed – Tied for 1st (0)

Kickoff return defense – Tied for 86th (22 ypr)

Kickoff returns – 22nd (25.3 ypr)

Net punting – 19th (41.4 ypp)

Punt return defense – 68th (7.9 ypr)

Punt returns – 17th (17.3 ypr)

The Kansas Jayhawks sing to the student section after fending off a late charge by Southeast Missouri State to win 34-28 on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

The Kansas Jayhawks sing to the student section after fending off a late charge by Southeast Missouri State to win 34-28 on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

MISCELLANEOUS --->

Fewest penalties – Tied for 77th (24)

Fewest penalties per game – Tied for 103rd (8)

Fewest penalty yards – 84th (219)

Fewest penalty yards per game – 104th (73)

Time of possession – 50th (30 mpg)

Reply

Three & Out with Texas…

• Kansas Jayhawks (2-1) vs. Texas Longhorns (1-2)
3:00 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, Memorial Stadium, Lawrence, Kansas

Three and out, with the Texas Longhorns...

1st Down

You've probably heard a lot about Texas' stout defense already this week, and with good reason. The Longhorns are among the nation's leaders in several defensive categories, with their 13 sacks in three games (4.3 per game) ranking sixth in the country and their 322 yards against total ranking 26th.

Eleven different Longhorns have recorded a sack – compared with just four for Kansas — and defensive tackle Malcom Brown, whom KU coach Charlie Weis called one of the best players he's seen, period, leads the way with 3.5 sacks. Hassan Ridgeway is right there behind Brown with 3 sacks on the season.

2nd Down

This week will mark the Big 12 opener for first-year UT coach Charlie Strong, who took over for Mack Brown in the offseason. Texas is 15-3 in Big 12 openers, with the only losses coming to Oklahoma State in 1997 and Kansas State in both 1998 and 2007. The first of those K-State losses came on the road, while the 2007 setback came in Austin, Texas.

UT is 6-2 all-time in Big 12 openers on the road.

Kansas, meanwhile, is 5-12 all-time in Big 12 openers, including a 3-4 mark in Big 12 openers at home.

3rd Down

It's interesting to note that Strong was one of several names on the hot list for KU back in 2009 when the Jayhawks were looking for a replacement for Mark Mangino.

Then a defensive coordinator at Florida, Strong became one of the nation's hottest names because of the toughness and production shown by his Gator defenses in the SEC.

KU hired Turner Gill and Strong was hired Louisville that same offseason. With the Cardinals, Strong racked up an impressive 37-15 record, while guiding Louisville to four consecutive winning seasons and four consecutive bowl appearances.

After going 7-6 and 7-6 in his first two seasons, Strong won 23 of his final 26 games with the Cardinals, going 11-2 in 2012 and 12-1 in 2013. He was hired by Texas last January after a long and highly publicize search to replace Brown.

Like KU coach Charlie Weis when he took over at Kansas, Strong has endured some bumps and bruises in the early going and dismissed nine players from the team while suspending a few others. Weis said earlier this week that, while a coaching transition always has some similarities, the task that Strong is saddled with is significantly different.

“It's always tough to follow a legend,” Weis said. “When you go to Texas, following Mack Brown, what do you do? Are you going to come in and say, here's all the things Mack Brown was doing wrong? I mean, it's kind of tough to do that. I think that Charlie is doing it his way, and I think he feels comfortable doing it his way, and I believe that he believes that that's the only way to get it done the way he wants to get it done.”

Punt

Saturday's meeting will be the 14th all-time between these two programs, with the Longhorns owning an 11-2 advantage.

UT has won 11 straight in the series, a streak that includes every match-up as Big 12 foes and KU's lone victories over UT came in 1901 and 1938.

The Jayhawks had the Longhorns on the ropes two years ago in Lawrence, but a touchdown inside the game's final 20 seconds allowed Texas to escape Lawrence with a victory. It was a cool day in Lawrence that day, but not one anyone other than the Texas football staff would consider overly cold. The Longhorns shipped in their own heated benches for that game and then proceeded to watch James Sims and the Jayhawks run all over them before sneaking out of town with the victory.

In addition to owning a clear advantage in total victories, the Longhorns' average score in games against Kansas has been 43-14, and Texas is 5-2 in games played in Lawrence.

Reply

Monday Report Card: Central Michigan

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes over the top of the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes over the top of the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

Here's a quick look back at a few grades from Saturday's 24-10 victory over Central Michigan....

• Montell Cozart — B

Cozart completed 70 percent of his passes and pretty much did everything that was asked of him. He threw two touchdown passes and one interception (which wasn't his fault) and helped give the KU offense much better flow and rhythm than it had the week before against Duke. His performance didn't wow anybody, but, he executed the game plan well, got multiple receivers involved and made a couple of key throws when he had to. Given the conservative nature of the game plan, he played a solid game.

• Jake Love — A

What can you say about this guy that does him any justice? Quiet. Under the radar. Hard worker. Not interested in headlines. All he does is go out there and play as hard as he can and make plays. Never was that more obvious than when he used his terrific instincts to blow up two CMU screen plays late in the game and, moments earlier, beat the would-be block of a CMU running back on his way to a monster sack. His play was fantastic, but it was his emotion that made the biggest impact. This was merely the latest big game from Love in a long line of them and it was cool to see him get some props for it.

KU's junior linebacker Jake Love puts a big sack on Central Michigan's quarterback  Cooper Rush (10) at Memorial Stadium, as the Hawks came home the winner 24-10.

KU's junior linebacker Jake Love puts a big sack on Central Michigan's quarterback Cooper Rush (10) at Memorial Stadium, as the Hawks came home the winner 24-10. by Richard Gwin

• Nigel King — B

King caught just three balls for 17 yards, with a long gain of 7 yards, but it was one of the most impressive three-catch, 17-yard games I've seen. It wasn't necessarily the stats that made King stand out, it was the way he went about getting them. The guy's a veteran. He's solid. He's where he's supposed to be. He runs good routes, flashes good hands and blocks when he's asked to block. Nothing about him is flashy, but, more important than that, nothing about him radiates anything but a polished player in control of his role and doing what he's asked to do. It's only a matter of time before King breaks through with a touchdown over the top.

• Andrew Bolton — C

The junior-college transfer who missed last season is still trying to adjust to Div. I football continues to look a step or two out of sync. Bolton still looks like he's thinking too much out there instead of playing on instincts and, on one play in the first half, he had CMU quarterback Cooper Rush dead to rights and instead of lowering the boom or wrapping him up, he simply reached out for him and watched the savvy Rush step up in the pocket right past him for a big gain. Bolton's still got time to get there and, he's still pretty raw. But he's definitely not there yet.

Kansas' Michael Reynolds (55) and Courtney Arnick (28) team up to sack Central Michigan quarterback Cooper Rush during the second half of their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas' Michael Reynolds (55) and Courtney Arnick (28) team up to sack Central Michigan quarterback Cooper Rush during the second half of their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

• Courtney Arnick — A

Arnick was everywhere on Saturday, finishing with four tackles, including one of the Jayhawk's three sacks. Known mostly for his speed an athleticism, Arnick showed he can get physical, too. Just a sophomore, the speedy Dallas native could make it hard for coaches to keep him off the field with more efforts like Saturday's. As Weis put it, “Arnick showed up today.”

• Larry Mazyck — C

A couple of false start penalties and one play where he leaked downfield a tick early made for a long afternoon for Mazyck. He was starting his first game in place of right tackle Damon Martin, who was out with an illness, and nobody knew Martin would miss the game until late in the week so Mazyck didn't have a ton of time to work with the knowledge that he would be the guy. Weis said Mazyck's made great progress in terms of his conditioning since his arrival. Now it's time for him to take a step forward in his execution.

UNIT GRADES --- in 10 words or less...

Pass Offense: B- Nothing fancy, but fancy not needed.

Run Offense: C- Line struggled and backs never really got going.

Pass Defense: B- Couple of missed sacks led to big completions.

Run Defense: B+ CMU averaged 2.9 ypc and gained just 101 yards.

Special Teams: C A couple decent returns, but another missed field goal.

Kansas senior Ben Heeney (31) applies preesure to Central Michigan quarterback Cooper Rush (10) during the second half of their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas senior Ben Heeney (31) applies preesure to Central Michigan quarterback Cooper Rush (10) during the second half of their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

Most Impressive Unit: Linebackers – Jake Love, Ben Heeney and Courtney Arnick were among KU's best players on defense on Saturday and, together, they combined for 16 tackles, seven for loss and two sacks.

Least Impressive Unit: Offensive Line – Good thing the gameplan was for Cozart to get rid of the ball quickly, because, if it hadn't been, Cozart might have been on his back a lot. The line was pushed back often, struggled to open holes for the KU running backs and looked a little out of sorts with first-time starters Larry Mazyck and Bryan Peters filling in for Damon Martin and Mike Smithburg, who missed the game with medical issues.

Kansas senior receiever Tony Pierson looks up field after making a catch in the flat during Kansas' game against Central Michigan on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas senior receiever Tony Pierson looks up field after making a catch in the flat during Kansas' game against Central Michigan on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

MVP: WR Tony Pierson. There's no telling what kind of game this would've been if KU didn't jump out to that early lead on the first play of the game. Fortunately for the Jayhawks, they didn't have to find out.

Hidden Heroes: OL Pat Lewandowski and Ngalu Fusimalohi. With the right side of the offensive line being held down by second stringers, the left side stepped up both in protecting Cozart and in opening what few holes there were for KU's backs to run. Never was that more evident than on Pierson's opening TD run and on Lewandowski's freeing block on Corey Avery's game-icing touchdown reception.

Better Luck Next Time: PK Matthew Wyman. The sophomore missed yet another field goal. His misses in the first two games were excusable. One was blocked from 50-plus and the other, also from 50-plus, was a desperation try just before halftime. Saturday's miss came from 35 yards out at a critical moment late in the third quarter. Wyman's been OK so far this year, but KU can't afford for its kicker to miss much, particularly now that Big 12 play is upon us.

Reply

The Day After: Surviving Central Michigan

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes over the top of the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes over the top of the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

There were plenty of mixed reactions to Saturday's 24-10 KU victory over Central Michigan at Memorial Stadium, but there's no questioning how much the win meant to the players.

Whether it was their jubilation on the field after big plays — Michael Reynolds' strip fumble of the quarterback, Jake Love's monster fourth quarter and JaCorey Shepherd's game-clinching interception come to mind first — or their celebration in front of the fans or in the locker room after the game, these guys got exactly what they needed yesterday, regardless of how pretty or ugly it was at times.

Several Jayhawks said after the game that the goal was to be 2-1 by the end of the day and they got there. Now the real work begins and the Jayhawks are in big-time need of taking some major steps forward in a hurry.

Quick takeaway

KU coach Charlie Weis said he liked the way Saturday's game was a “slugfest” because he knows the Jayhawks are going to have to get into a few more games like it the rest of the way if they hope to pick up another victory during ultra-tough Big 12 Conference play. KU started fast, finished strong and, regardless of how good or bad you think Central Michigan is, the Jayhawks found a way to make some plays to truly earn a victory, something that could do wonders for their confidence and overall vibe for the near future. It was far from perfect and there were still several of areas of concern, but the outcome is all that matters today, especially because these guys know it wasn't their best effort and they realize that they still have a ton of work to do. You can't blame them for celebrating a win. As wide receiver Justin McCay said, “wins are tough to come by.”

From left, KU Senior Ben Heeney (31) and junior Ben Goodman (93) go after a fumble against Central Michigan's Anthony Garland (44) on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

From left, KU Senior Ben Heeney (31) and junior Ben Goodman (93) go after a fumble against Central Michigan's Anthony Garland (44) on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Richard Gwin

Three reasons to smile

1 – It was a make-or-break week for QB Montell Cozart and he did enough to keep hope alive. By no means did Cozart look like an All-American out there, but he made the throws he was asked to make, looked pretty comfortable doing it and even made a couple of bigger, tougher throws in the second half. It was exactly the kind of performance Cozart needed — much closer to the first half vs. SEMO than last week vs. Duke — and it seemed exactly like the kind of game plan KU's offense should employ week in and week out with Cozart as the trigger man.

Kansas wasted no time getting on the board as senior Tony Pierson takes the ball 74 yards for a touchdown on the opening play from scrimmage during Kansas' game against Central Michigan on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas wasted no time getting on the board as senior Tony Pierson takes the ball 74 yards for a touchdown on the opening play from scrimmage during Kansas' game against Central Michigan on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

2 – Tony Pierson, man. He didn't do much after the opening touch of the game (mostly because he wasn't given a ton of opportunities after that), but boy was that 74-yard touchdown run significant. I talked to Tony after the game about his desire to try to hit that home run every time he touches it and he said that's the case more than ever now that he's playing wide receiver. He said they really emphasized taking the three- or four-yard gains and being OK with that when he was a running back, but it seems as if everyone's more than comfortable with him trying to take it to the house at his current position. Saturday showed why, yet again.

After beating Central Michigan lineman Ramadan Ahmeti (77) around the edge, Kansas senior Michael Reynolds (55) forces CMU quarterback Cooper Rush (10) to fumble during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

After beating Central Michigan lineman Ramadan Ahmeti (77) around the edge, Kansas senior Michael Reynolds (55) forces CMU quarterback Cooper Rush (10) to fumble during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

3 – The Jayhawks' defense got good pressure from their front seven. Forget the opponent for a minute, this team needed to see some positive things happen on defense from somewhere other than the secondary. Thanks to Michael Reynolds, Courtney Arnick and Jake Love, who all recorded sacks, they got just that. KU finished with those three sacks and a whopping 10 tackles for losses along with two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. It didn't shock the world and it won't scare the Big 12, but it came at just the right time for these guys who needed a breakthrough to believe that their hard work and effort were worth it and to take some confidence into the weeks ahead.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – KU's conservative offense limited Nick Harwell. The senior wide receiver who is oh so dangerous with the ball in his hands was limited to just three catches for 11 yards, this just one week after catching two balls for eight yards at Duke. Right now, it's understandable for KU to try to limit Cozart's load and make the game easy for him. But they're going to need Harwell if they want to have a chance in the Big 12. KU OC John Reagan did show some creativity by giving the ball to Harwell on a reverse that gained five yards, and, if they're going to have to keep being careful with Cozart, they're also going to have to keep thinking of different ways to get Harwell involved.

Kansas junior running back De'Andre Mann (23) fights for extra yardage against the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas junior running back De'Andre Mann (23) fights for extra yardage against the Central Michigan defense during their game on Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

2 – KU's running game showed very little in this one. Beyond the 74-yard run by Pierson on the game's opening play, the Jayhawks gained just 64 rushing yards the rest of the way. Take away the long runs by the team's top two backs — De'Andre Mann had a 14-yard burst and Corey Avery topped out at 10 yards — and you're looking at just 40 yards on 33 carries. Sure, the entire right side of the offensive line missed this one because of medical issues, but you'd still like to see the Jayhawks be good enough running left to be able to put together a better effort, particularly against Central Michigan.

3 – It's the little things that matter. The Jayhawks missed a field goal for the third game in a row and also committed eight penalties, several of which were simply mental errors like false starts or holding on a fair catch. Neither of those things can happen if the Jayhawks hope to have any chance in the Big 12.

One thought for the road

KU's victory over the Chippewas that improved the Jayhawks to 2-1...

• Pushed KU's advantage in the KU-CMU series to 2-0.

• Improved Kansas to 578-590-58 all-time.

• Featured the Jayhawks converting a season-high 47 percent of their third downs (9-for-19).

• Marked the second time this season that the KU defense held its opponent to three-and-out on its opening drive.

Next up

The Jayhawks will welcome Big 12 foe Texas to town for Homecoming on Saturday at 3 p.m. to kickoff conference play. The Longhorns (1-2) have struggled so far under first-year coach Charlie Strong and are coming off of their first bye of the season.

Reply

KU football senior Keon Stowers is sick of double-teams and ready to break out

Kansas defensive lineman Keon Stowers looks up at the scoreboard during the third quarter on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Oklahoma.

Kansas defensive lineman Keon Stowers looks up at the scoreboard during the third quarter on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Oklahoma. by Nick Krug

He entered the season hoping for a monster season, one that would show off the blood, sweat and tears he put into fine-tuning his skills and reshaping his body in the offseason.

Yet, so far, through two games, KU senior Keon Stowers has just seven tackles and a half tackle for a loss.

Not the numbers the former Georgia Military standout was hoping for, but the lack of production has hardly been all Stowers' fault.

See, when you start to make a name for yourself as a disruptive force, particularly on the defensive line, then other teams start to gameplan around you and try to do whatever they can to take you out of the action. In some cases, teams run away from a big-time tackler. Think Green Bay's Clay Matthews or Denver's Von Miller. Other times, teams run right at those same guys in hopes of neutralizing their momentum and making them react to something coming right at them instead of having time to rev up their engines to make a play.

In the case of Stowers, KU's 6-foot-3, 297-pound nose tackle, it's double-teams that have been the weapon of choice for KU's opponents.

Take the Duke game alone. In that one, the Kansas defense was on the field for 77 snaps. Stowers played 47 of those. And of those 47 snaps, he was double-teamed by two Duke offensive linemen 27 times, that's more than half of the plays.

Stowers has handled the extra attention well, even if he has been a little frustrated that it has prevented him from bringing down ball carriers. But even though he knows his occupying blockers is a good thing for the KU defense, he's still grown a little tired of the constant pounding.

“I am. I am,” he said. “But I really just feel like I could be in a tackle position where I'd be matched up with a tackle and get more production there. But I do a lot of things that go unnoticed like holding the double team so (linebacker Ben) Heeney and other guys can get in there. I do get tired of it, but that's my job.”

Duke running back Josh Snead breaks through Kansas defenders Keon Stowers, left, and JaCorey Shepherd during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Duke running back Josh Snead breaks through Kansas defenders Keon Stowers, left, and JaCorey Shepherd during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

Because KU's defensive line is full of unproven players, it makes sense that Stowers would become the focal point of opposing offenses, and he, the KU coaching staff and the rest of the guys next to him in the trenches expected it when the season began.

“We're a little thin at the D-Line,” Stowers said. “We accept that. We know that. We're not gonna be naive to it.”

Stowers said he was hopeful that things would change a little bit this weekend, when the Jayhawks face Central Michigan at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Memorial Stadium. Without divulging any details, the big man from Rock Hill, South Carolina, said the coaches had experimented with moving him around to different spots this week in hopes of freeing him up to make more plays.

“I've been lickin' my chops,” he said. “I really like my chances with this game and I've been studying the guards and the center and the tackle and I'm ready to play end, nose, tackle, wherever they put me at. Anything. I'm ready.”

As unselfish as any player on the roster, Stowers wanted to be sure to emphasize that all of this talk about him being double-teamed (something that I asked him to talk about, he didn't just bring it up on his own) was not even close to the most important thing on his mind right now.

That, he said, was helping Kansas find a way to bounce back from last week's debacle at Duke and getting back on the winning track.

“This is perfect timing,” he said of the expected physical match-up with CMU. “It's gonna give us the chance to not only be physical and not only show what we can do, but also to bounce back from a disappointing loss and not only put (Duke) away but to bury it.”

Clearly, that's the goal, but, because of the way things have gone in the past, there's at least part of these guys that can't help but wonder what things might be like if the outcome does not go that way. Stowers had no problem admitting that.

“If we go out there and lose, then it could be a situation where we start thinking, 'Uh oh, shoot. It's about to start.'”

That's not what anyone in crimson and blue, including Stowers, is expecting to see unfold this weekend, though.

“(This week) was one of our best Tuesday practices,” Stowers said. “We were flying around. Coach (Charlie) Weis was up moving more than usual and he was more involved. Mentally, we're past (Duke) and we're ready to beat Central Michigan.”

Reply

Cozart talks with media about Duke outing

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart is tailed by Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart is tailed by Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

Kansas University sophomore quarterback Montell Cozart on Wednesday met with the media for the first time since his disappointing outing at Duke last weekend in which he completed 11 of 27 passes for 89 yards with two interceptions and no touchdowns in a 41-3 loss.

True to what we've learned Cozart to be, the young QB walked into the chancellor's lounge at the Anderson Family Football Complex just after 1:45 p.m. with a bounce in his step and a smile on his face.

If he's letting last week's outing get to him, he sure isn't showing it.

I asked Cozart the first question of the day, a simple one: "Montell, what have the past few days been like for you?"

But like a seasoned veteran who had been through the ups and downs of playing quarterback dozens of times before, Cozart respectfully put the answer to my question on hold and issued a statement to kick things off.

“Last week, we were disappointed in our performance and I was disappointed in my performance, as well," Cozart said. "Sunday, I came in and talked to Coach Weis and Coach Reagan and Coach Powlus and we addressed the issues. We have no excuses for them, so we're just trying to move past it, look forward to Central Michigan and get ready for this game plan.”

There was nothing phony about it. And I'm sure it helped Cozart to publicly say what he said and take some of the blame for the offense's dismal performance.

I asked the KU media reps if the statement was planned or staged and they said it was not, that it was all Cozart wanting to own up to his part in the meltdown in Durham, North Carolina.

It might not help him complete passes or find open receivers, but the gesture showed that (a) he's a quality young man and (b) he cares. A lesser person would've moved on, let the Duke game die in the past and answered any questions about it with a snarky "I'm not gonna talk about that game any more, it's over." Not Montell. Good for him.

As for my question, he did answer it as soon as he finished his statement.

“They've been pretty good," he said of the past few days. "It's what comes with being the quarterback. Any quarterback goes through it. Started off a little slow, but got off to a great start as practice started to progress and we feel great about things going forward.”

Just for good measure, and to truly emphasize that he's not planning on letting the Duke performance be the one he's remembered for, Cozart threw in one last comment before talking about this week's match-up with Central Michigan.

“I feel good. I feel like that doesn't define me as the quarterback or who I am. I'm just moving forward and not trying to dwell on last week.”

After spending 10 to 20 seconds laughing the way an older brother would about something his younger brother did that he was proud of, senior defensive lineman Keon Stowers said there was nothing about Cozart's decision to get his flop off his chest that surprised him.

“I've been telling people, man," Stowers said. "He is a mature guy. He accepts his responsibility. He comes to work. That doesn't surprise me at all with him. I liked his attitude yesterday and that was encouraging.”

Reply

Three & Out with Central Michigan…

• Kansas Jayhawks (1-1) vs. Central Michigan (2-1)
— 2:30 p.m. (central) Saturday, Sept. 20, Memorial Stadium, Lawrence, Kansas —

Three and out, with the Central Michigan Chippewas...

1st Down

There are a couple of KU-CMU connections heading into this week's game but most of them are pretty distant. For starters, KU kicker Matthew Wyman hails from the state of Michigan (Bloomfield Hills) and Central Michigan offensive coordinator Morris Watts, a coaching legend, according to KU defensive coordinator Clint Bowen, held the same job at KU in 1982.

One interesting connection is that CMU head coach Dan Enos and KU running backs coach Reggie Mitchell both have worked at two of the same schools in the past (Western Michigan and Michigan State) but not at the same time. Beyond that, KU defensive line coach Buddy Wyatt and CMU assistant Kyle Nystrom were on the same staff at TCU and KU safeties coach Scott Vestal and Chippewas DC Joe Tumpkin worked on the same staff at SMU.

Finally, CMU wide receiver Anthony Rice hails from the same high school as KU long snapper Reilly Jeffers and grew up with Jeffers, Charlie Weis Jr., and Tre' Parmalee. KU coach Charlie Weis said Rice was over at the Weis house quite a bit growing up.

2nd Down

KU senior receiver Nick Harwell twice played against the Chippewas during his three seasons at Miami (Ohio) and had some pretty memorable days against them. In the 2010 game, Harwell racked up 97 yards and a touchdown on eight receptions. Two years later, in 2012, he racked up a whopping 215 yards and a touchdown on 11 receptions.

Different schools, different systems, different defenses, different quarterback, of course. But you gotta think that Harwell will be more than a little happy to see the CMU colors out there on the field on Saturday.

3rd Down

Dubbed by Charlie Weis as “an old school” football team, Central Michigan's offense enters this weekend averaging 20.3 points per game and with a pretty balanced attack. Of the Chippewas 52 first downs on the season, 24 have come via the pass and 23 have come via the run. (The other five have come via penalties).

CMU has a high success rate in the red zone (7-of-10) and also is averaging more than 30 minutes per game in time of possession. One of the more amazing stats for this offense is that it is averaging a first down every time it completes a pass, at 12.0 yards per completion.

Defensively, CMU has surrendered just 24 points per game (to teams including Purdue and Syracuse) and has been solid against the pass, giving up just 517 passing yards in three games and swiping six interceptions.

Punt

Don't expect the old school CMU defense to be overwhelmed by the idea of facing a quarterback who will be asked to throw and run. CMU coach Dan Enos said this week that KU QB Montell Cozart reminded him a lot of the QB the Chippewas just saw last week in Syracuse's Terrel Hunt.

"He's very similar," Enos said in comparing Cozart to Hunt. "He's big, got a strong arm, and he can move. And I thought the young man from Syracuse played very well and we didn't do enough things to disrupt him. We need to do a better job this week of that."

Enos also noted that several teams in the MAC feature dual-threat type quarterbacks so it's nothing the Chippewas won't have seen many times before.

"A lot of teams in our league are going to have quarterbacks who can move around and run and it's just something we're going to have to deal with every week," Enos said. "We've just got to get better, have a better game plan, and we've got to execute better."

Reply

KU QB Montell Cozart deserves time to show improvement

Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) stay hot on the trail of Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) stay hot on the trail of Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

Don't take this as me being a Montell Cozart or Kansas University football apologist looking for a silver lining during a few dark days.

It's not. Overall, the Jayhawks — and specifically Cozart — have been pretty awful for seven of the eight quarters they've played during this barely begun 2014 season. And there's no apologizing for that.

The Duke debacle was as bad as it's been since head coach Charlie Weis arrived and the more and more you look back at the opener, the more and more you start to realize that the Jayhawks may very well have been lucky to get out of that one alive. Unfortunately for all parties involved, the sluggish finish to the SEMO victory probably should have been viewed as a sign of things to come.

Many people saw that heading into the season. I didn't. In fact, I saw pretty much the exact opposite. I saw a fast start. I saw Cozart sprinting out of the gates with the kind of play that would energize and invigorate the fan base and I expected that on Sept. 16, Jayhawks everywhere would be talking more about the excitement of what's happening instead of dwelling on the uncertainty of what may come and what to do now.

Before we worry too much about the future, be that Central Michigan this weekend, Texas the weekend after that or what the program will look like on Dec. 1, I think it's important to gain a little perspective.

Cozart has been getting killed in the days since the Duke game and, when you're the quarterback, pretty much at any level, that's how it goes. You get the glory in the good days and you're the goat in the bad. That's nothing new and even casual sports fan know that's the way it goes.

So don't hold back on tossing blame at Cozart for the way the KU offense played against Duke. They were bad. He was awful. And Kansas, as we now know, stood no chance.

But do pull back on letting the Duke outing define Cozart as a college quarterback. He's 19 years old. He has started exactly five college football games in his life and barely played in enough to make up half a season. He deserves the chance to redeem himself. He deserves time to grow. He deserves to prove he is both willing to and can get better. Maybe he has it, maybe he doesn't, but a handful of games hardly seems like enough time to make a decision, for better or worse. If nothing else, the hard work and sacrifice he put in during the past 12 months should earn him a fair shake for a few more weeks.

All of this to a point, of course. If his Saturdays continue to look like last week, then the coaches owe it to the rest of the Jayhawks and the program in general to find a better option, perhaps even during the games. But we're not there yet.

If I know Montell at all, I know this is killing him. Weis said Monday morning that Cozart needed a little TLC on Sunday to help get past his poor performance and I've talked to enough people who saw him after the Duke game to know that he took it pretty hard. He's a confident kid. He's had success his entire life. And most of that success has come pretty easy and in pretty exciting fashion. Days like Saturday were not in Cozart's vocabulary.

Maybe that's part of the problem here. During the handful of interviews we did with Cozart throughout the spring and summer, we encountered a confident guy who believed in himself a great deal and believed he was going to hit the ground running and enjoy a solid season. He still might. But too many times his reasoning behind his confidence was that the whole thing reminded him of his path to QB prominence at Bishop Miege High. There's nothing wrong with drawing on past experiences to create confidence, calm the nerves or even fire you up to rise to a challenge. But maybe we should've seen such comments as a little bit of a warning sign that the young man might not quite be ready.

Cozart has all the physical tools you could want. He's fast, long, strong and blessed with incredible quickness and good vision. And he's a likable guy, too, which is important not only for the fan base but also for his teammates. Guys want to follow guys they like.

But simply having the right mind, body and soul for the job does not mean it'll be all aces when you get out there and face a team that's trying to knock your head off. Cozart still has to get used to that. And the only way to do it is by playing more games and succeeding or failing.

This is not high school. The path to him becoming KU's starting quarterback might mirror the path he took to taking the snaps at Miege, but that's where the similarities end. Now's the time for Cozart to pound out a new path, one fraught with potential pitfalls and mirages, good moments and bad.

Senior wide receiver Nick Harwell said after Saturday's game that outings like the one Cozart endured against Duke are part of the deal. “This was one of those games he's gonna have to get under his belt,” was how Harwell put it.

Everybody has 'em. Harwell did at Miami (Ohio). Ben Heeney did during his freshman year. Heck, even KU legend Todd Reesing was sent back to the bench after saving the Jayhawks against Colorado in his first ever appearance in 2006.

The question is, will Cozart learn from his early experiences the way those guys learned from theirs? The only way to find out is to give him time and to remember along the way that the young man is doing all of this for the first time.

Reply

Monday Report Card: Duke

Kansas cornerback JaCorey Shepherd jumps on the back of Duke running back Josh Snead after a catch during second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas cornerback JaCorey Shepherd jumps on the back of Duke running back Josh Snead after a catch during second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

We've already covered The Day After so now here's a quick look back at a few grades from Saturday's 41-3 loss at Duke....

• BEN HEENEY — B+

What can you say about an accomplished, all-Big 12 guy who ties his career-high for tackles, with 15, and, once again, seemed to be in on every single play? Heeney was shaken up in the first half but only missed a snap or two and got right back out there to do his job. One of the guys on this team who really shows how much it means to him by how hard he plays.

Kansas linebacker Ben Heeney tackles Duke running back Shaquille Powell during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas linebacker Ben Heeney tackles Duke running back Shaquille Powell during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

• CB DEXTER MCDONALD — C+

Picked on by Duke QB Anthony Boone early, McDonald had a very rough first quarter and that helped Duke set the tone and establish control. Gave up all four completions to Duke receiver Issac Blakeney in the game's first eight minutes and then settled in and started to play the kind of football we've come to expect from him. McDonald said the adjustment to matching up with Blakeney was difficult early because of the receiver's 6-foot-6 frame and physical style and because he expected to be on the smaller, quicker, 5-9 Jamison Crowder. Once he adjusted, he looked like the McDonald we all know. But that was a rough start and it set the tone and forced KU's safeties to think about cheating his way, which allowed slot receiver Max McCaffrey (7 catches, 79 yards, 2 TDs) more room to operate over the middle.

• RB COREY AVERY — B

Avery, a true freshman remember, ran hard for 87 yards on 16 carries and proved, yet again, that he's ready for whatever role the coaching staff wants to give him. Still has some things to learn/improve upon — most notably his route running and pass blocking — but he's young and he's way ahead of where most freshmen would be in thrown into his position. Hard to believe that even with the departure of James Sims and the loss of Brandon Bourbon and Taylor Cox to injury, the KU rushing attack just keeps humming along. If anything, KU should have run it way more than the 47 times they did on Saturday.

Kansas running back Corey Avery cuts between Duke defenders Jonathan Jones (34) and Jeremy Cash during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas running back Corey Avery cuts between Duke defenders Jonathan Jones (34) and Jeremy Cash during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

• CB MATTHEW BOATENG — C

Credit the freshman for going out there and proving he belongs and is able to hang with the big boys. Now he just needs to get more comfortable and polished. Beat deep a handful of times by just a step or two, but he didn't pay for it because the balls were overthrown. If the throws were on the money, he would've had a rough day, as he showed that he's still a few games away from combining his athleticism with his ever-improving understanding of what it takes to cover quality receivers at this level.

• QB MONTELL COZART — D-

Never looked comfortable all afternoon and, worse, looked indecisive and unable to make quick reads. Left plenty of opportunities for completions on the field by not picking up open receivers early, which allowed Duke's defense to get close to him and forced him to scramble or throw it away. One interception was tipped at the line but the ball was late coming out and, on the other, he missed a wide open Tony Pierson sitting in the soft spot of the Duke defense by firing it 7 yards over Pierson's head. Cozart did deliver a couple of nice runs but even those were frustrating because they showed what he should be doing and emphasized what he wasn't.

Kansas tight end Jimmay Mundine has nowhere to go as he is surrounded by several Duke defenders during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas tight end Jimmay Mundine has nowhere to go as he is surrounded by several Duke defenders during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

• TE JIMMAY MUNDINE — C

Caught three balls for 17 yards one week after being held without a catch, but still did not do enough to impact the game. Dropped one of the few catchable balls Cozart threw all day and did very little to help spark KU's struggling offense. The issues of the offense in this one certainly went well beyond what Mundine did or did not do, but as a veteran and a leader, you have to think there's something he could have done.

• UNIT GRADES --- In 10 words or less

Pass Offense: F Receivers got open, Cozart struggled to find or hit them.

Run Offense: C+ Avery, Mann solid; would've been better if Cozart ran more.

Pass Defense: C+ Rough opening drive but shut down top two Duke options.

Run Defense: D- Wilson gained 182 of his 245 yards on three carries.

Special Teams: B- Pardula good again, rest not noteworthy, good or bad.

Most Impressive Unit: Running Backs. For just their second games at the Div. I level, freshman Corey Avery and junior De'Andre Mann sure looked like seasoned veterans. The two combined for 196 of KU's 297 yards of offense and when you throw freshman Joe Dineen's late-but-meaningless 28 yards on top of it, it's clear that you're looking at one of the few position groups that showed up.

Least Impressive Unit: Defensive Line. No sacks. Huge holes for Duke freshman Shaun Wilson to run through en route to breaking a 20-year-old school record for single-game rushing yards. And minimal pressure on Duke quarterback Anthony Boone.

MVP: CB JaCorey Shepherd. After a so-so game in the opener, Shepherd bounced back in a big way in this one. He did not give up a single significant completion, and every time the Blue Devils challenged him deep, he was right on the hip of the man he was covering. All-ACC receiver Jamison Crowder caught just two balls for 14 yards.

Hidden Hero: DL T.J. Semke. The former walk-on turned scholarship and starting defensive lineman was one of the few guys consistently around the ball during this one. He finished with a career-best six tackles and proved, once again, that he's not afraid to tangle with anyone.

Better Luck Next Time: QB Montell Cozart. After starting the season with so much promise, Cozart struggled mightily in this one. He missed guys when they were open, had trouble deciding when to take off and run and looked overwhelmed and lost throughout much of the game. He's still young. So these kinds of growing pains are bound to happen.

Reply

The Day After: Disappointment at Duke

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart reacts after a turnover on downs by the Jayhawks against Duke during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart reacts after a turnover on downs by the Jayhawks against Duke during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

The road losing streak hit 28, the final score left Kansas 38 points shy and an unknown number of KU fans were up in arms about it.

It was that kind of day for the KU football team in Durham, North Carolina on Saturday, a time and place that many believed would be a heck of a lot different than the same old, bad blowouts we've seen in the past.

Instead, it was a lot of the same frustrating football that has plagued Kansas for the past five seasons — big plays and easy scores for the opponent, an offense that struggled to get anything going and a room full of players and coaches who had trouble finding answers when it was all over.

The Jayhawks' 41-3 loss to Duke may have merely dropped them to 1-1 on the season, but if ever a 1-1 team felt like 0-10, this is it.

It should be very interesting to see where things go from here with all aspects of the program.

Quick takeaway

For the first time in the Charlie Weis era, it seems like people have had enough. The KU fan base, as a whole, has not been entirely supportive of Weis and this team throughout his time, but there always had been enough people who backed the program to cancel out those who didn't. Saturday night, though, even the optimists kept quiet and some turned to the dark side. The Jayhawks were not out-talented by Duke, but they were out-played, out-coached and out-manned. This one, to me, seems like the first undeniable step in the wrong direction since Weis took over, and the future of the program, from top to bottom, all of a sudden, has landed in a very dicey position.

Three reasons to smile

1 – Let's be honest; after a game like that, there just aren't many. I thought senior linebacker Ben Heeney was Heeney (but was anyone surprised by that?); I thought senior cornerback JaCorey Shepherd showed he's every bit on the same level as Dexter McDonald and I thought Michael Reynolds played his butt off, particularly in the first half, when he just kept getting close off the right edge but never quite got to Duke QB Anthony Boone. Other than that, there were serious concerns pretty much everywhere else on the field and the Jayhawks left Durham in need of some serious soul-searching just two weeks into the 2014 season.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – Other than the obvious drawbacks of the lopsided final score and the aftermath that followed, there were a few specific aspects of this latest loss that were concerning. The biggest, obviously, was the play of Montell Cozart, who looked incredibly sharp and in control during the opening quarter of the season but has looked anything but that during the seven quarters since. Cozart has the physical tools, but he's young and he's still learning and for every 3-touchdown-no-interception game (like he had vs. SEMO in the opener) there are going to be days like Saturday. The question now just becomes, “How quickly can he pick things up and improve?”

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart is tailed by Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart is tailed by Duke defenders Kyler Brown (56) and David Helton (47) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

2 – KU's option game was atrocious in this one. I like the option for this offense because it puts Cozart in a position to attack and put pressure on the defense with his best asset. When it's blocked the way it was on Saturday, though, it looks like something you'd see at a Pop Warner game. Because of Duke's penetration on the edge — read: KU's blocking breakdowns up front — Cozart and the KU running backs just had to keep stringing it out and stringing it out all the way down the line until they reached the sideline. At that point, Cozart usually pitched it, but with the sideline so close and so many Blue Devils in pursuit, it looked like Duke had two players there for every one Jayhawk in the area. The option game is as much an attitude as it is about being assignment sound and the Jayhawks failed in both categories against Duke.

3 – The Jayhawks ran more plays (76-71) and won the time of possession battle (32:34-27:26) but had just three points to show for it? That begs the question, “What the heck were they doing when they had the ball?” The answer? Not much. Just five of KU's 14 possessions ended as a three-and-out but only one went over the 4-minute mark and that was the second-to-last drive of the game, when KU drove 72 yards in nine plays and 4:12 but turned it over on downs after doing most of that work against Duke's reserves. Five of KU's drives included seven plays or more — including the 10-play, 58-yard drive that produced the team's only points — but KU found itself facing third-and-long a lot of the time and often failed to take or see the shorter gains that would have set up more manageable third-down scenarios.

Kansas receiver Tony Pierson reacts after being ruled out of bounds after a catch during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas receiver Tony Pierson reacts after being ruled out of bounds after a catch during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

One thought for the road

KU's latest lopsided loss...

• Moved the Jayhawks to 577-591-58 all-time.
• Tied the all-time series between the two basketball-blueblood schools at 1 win apiece.
• Was the 28th consecutive loss away from home. KU's next chance to snap its road losing skid comes Oct. 4 at West Virginia, the team the Jayhawks beat last season to snap a 27-game Big 12 Conference losing streak.
• Featured points in the first quarter for the second game in a row. Kansas scored in the first quarter just four times in 12 tries last season.

Next up

KU returns home to face Central Michigan, which, two weeks ago popped Purdue, but, last week, was rocked by Syracuse, 40-3. The Chippewas were a bowl team a year ago and certainly will not be an easy out for this struggling KU squad. Kickoff is set for 2:30 p.m. at Memorial Stadium.

Montell Cozart and the Jayhawks are backed deep into their own territory during an offensive set in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Montell Cozart and the Jayhawks are backed deep into their own territory during an offensive set in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2013 at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

Reply

5-foot-11 JaCorey Shepherd goes over how to cover 6-6 Duke WR Issac Blakeney

Kansas cornerback JaCorey Shepherd (25) wraps up Mountaineer receiver Stedman Bailey (3) before the ball reached him in the second half of KU's 59-10 loss Saturday against West Virginia University in Morgantown, W.Va. Shepherd was called for pass interference on the play.

Kansas cornerback JaCorey Shepherd (25) wraps up Mountaineer receiver Stedman Bailey (3) before the ball reached him in the second half of KU's 59-10 loss Saturday against West Virginia University in Morgantown, W.Va. Shepherd was called for pass interference on the play. by Mike Yoder

Good evening ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to tonight's main event.

In the red corner, standing at 5 feet, 11 inches and weighing in at 195 pounds.... He hails from Mesquite, Texas, and is a senior in his final season at Kansas.... The receiver of the secondary, the king of kindness, the DB with the sweet J, JaCorey "The Protector" Shepherd.

In the blue corner, standing 6 feet, 6 inches and weighing in at 225 pounds.... He hails from Monroe, North Carolina, and is a senior in his fifth season at Duke... The overlooked man, the two-sport standout, Sir Issac Blakeney.

OK, so maybe that won't be exactly the way it's billed on Saturday when we get down to Durham for KU's Week 2 match-up with Duke. But it sure has felt that way in the days leading up to the game.

Shepherd, a Kansas cornerback, and Blakeney, a Duke wide receiver who also ran with the Duke track team last spring, could play huge roles in determining whether their teams win or lose when the Jayhawks and Blue Devils lock horns on Saturday, and Shepherd, a defensive-back who started his career as a wide receiver, could not be more pumped for the showdown.

At 6-6, Blakeney stands seven full inches taller than Shepherd, which not only gives him a huge advantage in terms of reach but also gives him an advantage in terms of his stride while running to the ball.

Duke WR Issac Blakeney pulls away from a defender during a recent Blue Devils' victory (AP Photo)

Duke WR Issac Blakeney pulls away from a defender during a recent Blue Devils' victory (AP Photo) by Matt Tait

Shepherd said he's never covered a player as tall as Blakeney and he's worked overtime this week to make sure he's ready with a few tricks, some of which date back to his days as a high school basketball player.

“That's one of the first things my dad said,” Shepherd joked. “'Back to basketball when you had to play (power forward).' That's gonna be a challenge for me, and I'm looking forward to it. I've never had to go up against somebody that big.”

So what's the secret?

“I just feel like I have to be more aware of body control,” Shepherd said. “He definitely can get me in a situation where he can shield me from the ball. And obviously the jump balls. If they throw it up there, I've gotta know where I'm at on the field and know where he's at and feel him out.”

With a receiver who stands 6-6, jump balls are inevitable. If nothing else, they're a great last resort for a quarterback who finds himself in trouble and sees no one else open. That's especially true in the red zone.

Shepherd has a strategy for the high lobs when they come his way and it focuses more on what not to do than what he should do.

“I can't jump too early,” he said. “If anything, I'd rather jump later so he's coming down while I'm going up.”

Shepherd figures to draw a lot of action in this one because of last weekend's standout performance from his partner-in-crime, Dexter McDonald, who swiped two interceptions and broke up two more passes in KU's victory over Southeast Missouri State.

The theory goes that teams may shy away from McDonald after seeing a performance like that — it happened to some degree last season — and be more willing to try their luck with Shepherd. The mere thought brings a smile to Shepherd's face and a sparkle to his eyes.

“I actually like that,” he said. “That's me. Dex did me a favor.”

Of course, Shepherd is also smart enough to know that McDonald's presence on the field will not be enough to keep Duke from using its top weapon in the passing game, senior wideout Jamison Crowder, who stands 5-9, 175.

“He's still gonna get tested,” Shepherd said of McDonald. “They have good receivers. The guy Dex is matched up with, he's a legit receiver. They're not gonna shy away from him. He's one of their best receivers.”

Regardless of who checks who or even how often KU sprinkles in different zone coverage looks to try to match up, both Shepherd and McDonald figure to find themselves in several make-or-break, one-on-one situations on Saturday and it could become a situation where the last man standing brings home a victory for his team.

As famed ring announcer Michael Buffer might say.... Let's get ready to ruuuuummmmmmmmbbbbblllllllllllllle...

Reply

Three & Out with Duke…

Duke Head Coach David Cutcliffe talks with quarterback Anthony Boone (7) in the second half of an NCAA college football game at Veterans Memorial Stadium, Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in Troy, Ala. (AP Photo/ Hal Yeager)

Duke Head Coach David Cutcliffe talks with quarterback Anthony Boone (7) in the second half of an NCAA college football game at Veterans Memorial Stadium, Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in Troy, Ala. (AP Photo/ Hal Yeager)

• Kansas Jayhawks (1-0) at Duke (2-0)
2:30 p.m. (central) Saturday, Sept. 13, Wallace Wade Stadium, Durham, North Carolina

Three and out, with the Duke Blue Devils...

1st Down

Duke enters this week’s game vs. Kansas with an 18-11 non-conference record under current coach David Cutcliffe. One of those 11 losses came to Kansas in 2009, when the Jayhawks drubbed Cutcliffe's club, 44-16, in Lawrence.

KU coaches Clint Bowen and John Reagan, both on the Jayhawks' staff in 2009, said they would not be able to take much from that game that will help them this week, other than the knowledge and memory of how disciplined, detailed and prepared Cutcliffe's club was that day. Bowen remembered specifically the first couple of plays from scrimmage catching the Kansas defense off-guard.

In the last 12 regular season non-league games, Cutcliffe has guided the Blue Devils to an 11-1 mark, including eight straight regular season non-conference victories.

2nd Down

Did you know that KU coach Charlie Weis once hired Duke coach David Cutcliffe to be his quarterbacks coach at Notre Dame? Weis has long been a fan of Cutcliffe's mastery of offense and play-calling and Weis said earlier this week that he picked Cutcliffe to join him at Notre Dame back in 2005 with the idea of eventually handing over the offense to him.

It never happened and neither did Weis and Cutcliffe working together. Cutcliffe resigned from the post before really getting started after suffering a heart attack and having triple-bypass surgery.

Cutcliffe was out of football for all of 2005 and he rejoined the Tennessee coaching staff in 2006 and 2007 (he previously worked at Tennessee from 1982-98 and helped develop Peyton Manning into one of college and professional football's greats). In 2008, the former Ole Miss head coach took the head job at Duke, where he has racked up a 33-44 record and is now in his seventh season.

“I was looking for somebody I could turn the offense over to and I thought David was one of the best minds out there,” Weis said this week. “Not only was he well-schooled with the quarterback position, which is his reputation, but I thought he'd be a perfect person to hand over the offense to because of his mind and his ability as a play caller. What he's done there is what I would expect him to do anywhere. Just about anywhere he's gone, in an ample amount of time, he's been able to get things going in the right way, especially offensively. He's a very, very good coach.”

3rd Down

Although they wound up losing 34-17 to the Blue Devils last week, Troy proved one thing early on: Duke is vulnerable to a strong running attack.

On its first two drives of the game, Troy gained 100 yards on 16 carries — and 166 yards in all — and jumped out to a 14-3 lead. Duke's D tightened up after that giving up just 58 more rushing yards and limiting Troy to a 3.7 yards-per-rush total.

But the two successful drives that opened the game each were 83-yard drives, with one taking 11 plays and another a whopping 13.

The Blue Devils lost All-ACC linebacker Kelby Brown to a season-ending knee injury in August and that left senior David Helton (6-4, 240) as one of the few experienced linebackers on the roster. In the first two weeks alone, Duke has relied upon a red-shirt freshman and a true freshman to play a significant number of snaps in the middle of the defense.

Duke's first two opponents of 2014 recorded 152 and 158 yards on the ground in losses to the Blue Devils.

Punt

While last year's 10-win team was one of the best in Duke history, the 2014 version is hardly the same club. In addition to losing two of the team's top returners in Brown and fellow-all-ACC tight end Braxton Deaver to preseason injuries, the Blue Devils saw 21 players make their collegiate debuts in the season opener, with five true freshmen and 13 red-shirt freshmen playing in a college game for the first time.

However, despite that fresh blood, Duke still features an experienced roster. In all, the Blue Devils field 21 seniors on their roster, 17 of whom are listed on the two-deep depth chart.

Reply

The challenges — and advantages — of coaching football at a basketball school

Kansas men's basketball coach Bill Self and KU football coach Charlie Weis get together for a radio talk show Monday, July 30, 2012, at the Oread Hotel.

Kansas men's basketball coach Bill Self and KU football coach Charlie Weis get together for a radio talk show Monday, July 30, 2012, at the Oread Hotel. by Richard Gwin

Saturday's match-up between 1-0 Kansas and 2-0 Duke no doubt would grab much more attention if it were played in Allen Fieldhouse or Cameroon Indoor Stadium instead of outside on the turf at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Let's face it: Duke and Kansas are both basketball schools and there's not a person on the planet who doesn't think that.

That includes KU football coach Charlie Weis, who, on Tuesday, talked about the challenges — and advantages — of coaching the football team, which, in many opinions and at most schools is the king of college athletics, at a school where basketball rules.

"I don't know what (Duke coach) David (Cutcliffe) thinks," Weis said. "He's got Coach K and I've got Bill Self. Does it get any better than that? I mean, you're talking about arguably the two best, two of the best coaches in America. So from my standpoint, I hope basketball wins every game every year regardless of how we do. I appreciate the support I get from Coach Self and our basketball team, but most importantly, I can utilize their success to help use that as something to shoot for and definitely use as a recruiting tool.

Weis continued....

"You can do one of two things: You can feel like a second‑class citizen or you can play into it, and I totally play into it. Totally. I don't look at it like that at all. I'm more than content with our basketball team competing for a national championship every year. I just want to get our team to where we're winning more than we're losing on an annual basis. That's what I want to do. I want to be winning more than we're losing on an annual basis. When we get to that point, you can ship me out of here. I don't want to do it once. I want to make sure we've got that set. Once we get that set, you can pack me up and send me out if that's what you want to do."

That last part was said with no bitterness or poor-me mentality. It merely was Weis re-emphasizing what he came to Kansas to accomplish, which was to get the KU football program to the point where it's considered a perennial winner.

The general rule of thumb used to be that new coaches would — or at least should — get five years to make that happen. Weis' contract with Kansas was for five years. And although he just started Year 3, he pointed to Cutcliffe's path at Duke as proof positive that, if given time, such a transformation is possible — even at a basketball school like Duke or Kansas.

"I know that Years 3 and 4 they won three games," Weis said of Cutcliffe at Duke. "So was he lighting the world on fire at that time? I mean, what he did was he put in a plan, he recruited, recruited, recruited, got guys he can get into Duke, which is not the easiest thing to do, OK, stuck to the plan, had support from the administration, OK, didn't waver. When people were saying, well, where is this heading, and all of a sudden Year 6 they go and win 10. That's the way it happens a lot of times when you walk into a program that just hasn't done too well recently. I have a lot of respect for the job they've done, and hopefully we cannot only emulate that, but hopefully we can speed up that timetable just a tad."

KU and Duke will square off, in football, at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Duke's home stadium.

Reply

Monday Report Card: SEMO

Kansas receiver Tony Pierson cruises up the sideline for a long gain against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas receiver Tony Pierson cruises up the sideline for a long gain against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

With the usual Monday Rewind blog being overtaken by our our Day After blog, which went up Sunday afternoon, I figured something else needed to fill its place.

With that, the Monday Report Card was born.

Unlike most report cards, which typically provide a detailed look at everything a student does during a given quarter or semester, this report card will be a little more random and will highlight a few of the good and bad individual performances while trying to mix in a few young guys and a few veterans along with quick-hit grades for each unit.

It may differ from week to week and just because one guy's name appears in the report card one week does not necessarily mean he'll be on the next one the following Monday. As I said, it's more of a snapshot of the good and the bad rather than a complete analysis.

Let's start with the offense.

• QB MONTELL COZART — B+

Cozart himself even admitted to misreading a couple of things and going the wrong way on one play, but, all things considered, I thought he played well. He threw a bunch of good balls, did not turn the ball over and kept several plays alive with his feet while also looking good throwing on the run. Cozart is clearly confident in his abilities and it does not look like the rest of the offense has any problem letting a young guy lead them. A solid B is good for a guy making his fourth career start in a season opener, but if the Jayhawks want to win more than a couple of games this year, Cozart's going to have to elevate his play to the A-range.

• WR NICK HARWELL — B

The senior transfer who sat out all of last season got open a lot and snagged a couple of touchdowns on 4 receptions for 46 yards. All good numbers. And his ability to repeatedly get open and sure hands were a welcome sight for a Kansas wide receiver. But I'd like to see Harwell be even more involved. And I bet he will be from here on out. There's no way that OC John Reagan wanted to show too much of what Harwell can do on film. Three of his four receptions came in the Jayhawks' first four possessions. In the final 11, he caught just one ball and received one carry (a reverse) while being targeted four more times. That's four catches and one carry in eight targets and one rushing attempt. Not bad. But the guy is so smooth, so dynamic and so reliable that it's obvious he can do a lot more. If some of those incompletions were dropped in an inch or two softer, he turns in a monster stat line. Cozart may have missed the throws but Harwell took the blame, so I'll take his word for it. All in all, a pretty solid KU debut.

Kansas running back De'Andre Mann escapes a Southeast Missouri State defender during a run in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas running back De'Andre Mann escapes a Southeast Missouri State defender during a run in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

• RB DE'ANDRE MANN — A-

Mann put the ball on the ground one time, but other than that had a pretty flawless night. He ran hard, inside and outside, racked up 121 yards on just 15 carries and brought a power-running dynamic that this team is going to need as it tries to control clock and keep opposing offenses at bay. The only negatives were the fumble and Mann's inability to pick up a yard on a fourth-and-one with KU leading 31-7. But his coming up short there had as much to do with the O-Line as anything. Overall, the juco transfer ran hard, showed a nice mix of running styles and served as a solid complement to freshman Corey Avery, who got a lot of work early and then gave way to the veteran. Mann said after the game that the only thing missing from his KU debut was a touchdown. Avery got that and the two seem to have a healthy competition between each other for yards, carries and scores. That can only help.

• CB DEXTER MCDONALD — A

Other than giving up a completion that delivered SEMO's first first down of the game (it was bound to happen sometime), McDonald was sensational. His two interceptions and subsequent returns showed why teams prefer not to throw his way. And his two pass break-ups might have been even more impressive than the INTs.

• S ISAIAH JOHNSON — C

I thought Johnson looked a little off throughout the game. Could've been him shaking off some rust, but he finished with just two tackles (both assists) and didn't record another defensive stat. In addition, he was a part of a KU secondary that inexplicably gave up three fourth-quarter touchdown passes, one of them a 26-yard score on fourth-and-seven, no less, and another, late in the game, in which Johnson seemed to read and react well but simply ran with the receiver to the back of the end zone instead of trying to play the ball or deliver a hit. Johnson was a pleasant surprise last season and took home Big 12 defensive newcomer of the year honors. Because of that, the bar has been raised for him a little bit and the expectations go up. Look for Johnson to have a strong bounce-back game against Duke.

• BUCK MICHAEL REYNOLDS — B-

Reynolds was active (4 tackes, 1.5 for loss) and played with great effort but never found it all that easy to get much pressure on SEMO QB Kyle Snyder. He was in the ballpark for a couple of hurries but Snyder seemed a little too comfortable throughout the game and was able to kind of play backyard football and chuck it around out there knowing he had nothing to lose. That had as much as anything to do with SEMO's three-touchdown fourth quarter. Not every team KU faces will feel as free and loose to chuck the ball around the yard and Reynolds will have to be a big reason for that.

———

• UNIT GRADES... in 10 words or less

Pass Offense: B- WRs are legit; Cozart was efficient early but misfired late.

Run Offense: A- Thanks to Avery and Mann, run game still a strength.

Pass Defense: C+ Performed better than you think. Oh, that fourth quarter.

Run Defense: C+ QB run-game effective at times; 3.4 ypc against pretty good.

Special Teams: B- Pardula solid, blocked FG a breakdown, return game gave little.

———

Most Impressive Unit: Had to be the WRs. Harwell, Pierson, McCay and King all looked sharp.

Least Impressive Unit: O-Line, which held up well in pass protection, committed half of KU's penalties (including three false starts) and struggled to get a push in short yardage situations.

MVP: I'll go with senior receiver Tony Pierson. Pierson racked up 139 yards of total offense — 44 rushing, 95 receiving — and added a highlight touchdown catch and run that was as pretty as any he's had. Pierson is a game changer and he was sensational in his long-awaited return from a head injury that cost him most of the second half of last season.

Kansas safety Fish Smithson brings down Southeast Missouri State running back Lewis Washington during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas safety Fish Smithson brings down Southeast Missouri State running back Lewis Washington during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Hidden Hero: Safety Fish Smithson. Tied for second on the team with five tackles and played fast, physical and aggressive every time he was out there.

Better Luck Next Time: Tight end Jimmay Mundine. Not utlizing the tight end may have been by design, but Mundine went without a catch in this one and was targeted just once while also being whistled for a holding penalty. He was involved in other elements of the passing game and helped get receivers open, but he's widely regarded as a bona fide weapon who, with his size, speed and athleticism, can create mismatches in KU's favor. Perhaps they'll show up more against Duke.

Reply

The Day After: A scary victory over SEMO

Kansas head coach Charlie Weis watches the video board after a late fourth-quarter touchdown by Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas head coach Charlie Weis watches the video board after a late fourth-quarter touchdown by Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

If you just watched the first quarter of KU's season-opening football victory over Southeast Missouri State, you probably came away pretty impressed.

And with good reason. That quarter, in which KU built a 24-0 lead by scoring on four straight possessions and not giving up a single first down, was without question one of the best quarters we've seen from a Kansas team in the past five years.

After that, however, things weren't as pretty and, if you're judging this team by how it finished the game instead of how it started, you probably came away a little worried. That, too, is understandable.

Regardless of which camp you're in, both sides have solid points and, after a game like that, in which the home team wins by six and is outscored 28-10 after such a blazing start, any and all questions are valid.

However you look at it, KU, which mixed a lot of young guys and newcomers in with a healthy dose of veterans, held on for the victory, improved to 1-0 and has another week of work and preparation in front of it before having to prove what it learned from the opener.

Put another way: Now's when the fun starts.

Quick takeaway:

It wasn't all pretty, but a win's a win and that's the approach the Kansas University football team is taking into next week as it begins preparations for a huge game at Duke. Sophomore QB Montell Cozart turned in a solid debut as the team's starter. The wide receivers he threw to were equally as impressive. And newcomers De'Andre Mann and Corey Avery showed the running game is still in good hands. Surprisingly — especially after a stellar start — it was the KU pass defense that left me scratching my head. No way did I expect to emerge from the opener with a bunch of answers on offense and questions on defense, especially not from the secondary, which turned in a better-than-solid season in 2013 and returned all four starters. It wasn't the ideal opener the way it looked like it might be after the first quarter. Far from it, in fact. But now the Jayhawks know where the issues are and now the rest of us get to see how they go about addressing them.

Three reasons to smile:

1 – The Jayhawks are 1-0. As KU coach Charlie Weis said in his postgame comments, it's not like KU's had a hundred victories in the past few years. It's OK to enjoy them when they come. And that goes for the fans too. You can't get to 2-0 without being 1-0 first and that's where this team stands. Perhaps the best part about that is the reminder it provides that they are still just one week into the season. Plenty of time for improvement, plenty of time to iron out the wrinkles. A bunch of coaches believe teams make their biggest jump from Week 1 to Week 2. If that's the case with this team, that bodes well for KU's chances at Duke next weekend.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart throws against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart throws against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

2 – Montell Cozart is a real, live college quarterback. KU coach Charlie Weis said it best after the game when he said that Montell bailed out the KU offense with his legs and ability to move out of the pocket and throw on the run. What's more, he looked good doing it. Cozart wasn't perfect, but it was a pretty solid start. He looked confident, spread the ball around well and made some really nice throws. Like everybody except maybe for Dexter McDonald and Trevor Pardula, he'll need to improve on that performance in the coming weeks if KU wants to be competitive with tougher opponents, but, all things considered, you have to feel pretty good about what Cozart showed in Week 1.

3 – These Jayhawks have legit wide receivers. Nick Harwell is as good as advertised. Tony Pierson still has it. And Nigel King and Justin McCay are a couple of big targets who bring a lot in the passing game and running game. It's been a while since KU has had such a good looking crop of receivers and it was wildly entertaining to watch them deliver in the opener. If Cozart and company can tighten things up by an inch or two on those deep balls, this passing attack stands to be pretty explosive all season.

Kansas receivers Justin McCay (19) and Nick Harwell (8) celebrate Harwell's first touchdown of the game against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas receivers Justin McCay (19) and Nick Harwell (8) celebrate Harwell's first touchdown of the game against Southeast Missouri State during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to sigh:

1 – What happened in the second half? Things looked so positive in the first quarter. The offense scored on all four possessions. The defense gave up just 42 yards and no first downs. And Kansas led 24-0. For a while, both at the game and on the Internet, the KU fan base actually was impressed by the product on the field. But then KU hit the brakes and managed just 10 points the rest of the way while somehow giving up 28. The crowd thinned out as it always does and several players said that disappointed them. It should. But they should also realize that the only guaranteed way they're going to bring the energy they need to compete is to find it within themselves and then make that the norm regardless if they're under the lights in front of 50,000 or in a driving rain on a dark day in front of 500. There were elements of the late stumble that could be chalked up to Week 1 rust. But there were others that qualify as major concerns if they don't take care of them quickly.

Kansas defenders Matthew Boateng, Ronnie Davis and Courtney Arnick react to a late touchdown catch by Southeast Missouri State during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas defenders Matthew Boateng, Ronnie Davis and Courtney Arnick react to a late touchdown catch by Southeast Missouri State during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

2 – Why does KU let QBs like Snyder get, look and feel comfortable? I've seen it the past couple of seasons and I've never understood it. I realize that these other teams have good athletes, tough kids and competitors, but there's no way that an opposing quarterback at an FCS school should ever get to the point where he's comfortable and controlling the game. SEMO's Kyle Snyder had that look in the fourth quarter and it wasn't good for Kansas. Snyder threw for 269 yards and 3 TDs and was sacked just once. Bottom line: KU has to find a way to get more pressure on these guys so the DBs don't have to cover for as long. Weis said SEMO's unbalanced sets made it tough to bring pressure. And I'm sure that's true. But at some point, pressure can still come from a guy in blue deciding he's going to beat the man standing in front of him on his way to making a play. There were a few of those moments. But not nearly enough.

3 – After going 3-of-4 on third down in the first quarter, KU picked up first downs in just two more such situations in 11 tries. Cozart and the offense looked much improved. But there were still too many times when the offense stalled and forced the defense to go back onto the field. Time of possession was about dead even (29:59-29:58 in favor of KU) but, in a game like this against an opponent like that, KU should have won the TOP battle by a much larger margin and, if they had, SEMO would never have come close to scoring 28 points.

One for the road:

KU's six-point survival against SEMO on Saturday:

• improved the program to 577-589-58 all-time.
• bumped KU's record to 71-47-7 in season openers.
• was the Jayhawks' fourth-straight season-opening win, giving head coach Charlie Weis a 3-0 record in the first week of a season while at Kansas.
• made KU 9-1 in its last 10 home openers.
• gave Kansas win No. 27 in 30 tries against non-conference foes at home dating back to the start of the 2003 season.

Next up:

Kansas (1-0) will travel to Durham, North Carolina, to take on the Duke Blue Devils (2-0), in the return game of a home-and-home series that started with KU knocking off Duke 44-16 in September of 2009. Kickoff is set for 2:30 p.m., Central time.

The Kansas Jayhawks hold themselves back before bursting onto the field prior to kickoff against Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

The Kansas Jayhawks hold themselves back before bursting onto the field prior to kickoff against Southeast Missouri State on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Reply

My picks for the 2014 KU football season

Kansas head coach Charlies Weis watches warmups from a golf cart during Fan Appreciation Day, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas head coach Charlies Weis watches warmups from a golf cart during Fan Appreciation Day, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

I like this Kansas football team. And I'm not afraid to say it.

I like that it's made up of tough, talented, hungry football players who have a good blend of experience and disappointment driving them, and that, after two seasons of disappointment and misery, it's a team that truly believes the 2014 season will be different than anything we've seen in the past five seasons.

I happen to agree. And throughout the next few scrolls through cyberspace I'll explain why.

Despite its upgrades at several key positions and all that fire to find a way to win, KU is facing another ultra-tough schedule. That makes it hard to see hope on the horizon, but also lends itself to an automatic dose of confidence should things go well early for the Jayhawks.

That's what I'm banking on, and that's why I'm picking the Jayhawks to become bowl eligible and finish the regular season with a 6-6 record.

I could have said four wins to avoid embarrassment. Or I could have gone with the, well-they've-been-so-bad-these-past-few-years approach and picked two or three victories. But doing so would have caused me to go against what I think and I'm not in the habit of doing that. For better or worse, I always jump on here and try to tell you what I think. Sometimes it's flat wrong and my take or optimism is misguided. Other times, it's right and, instead of celebrating that, I simply look at it as a job well done.

In the end, though, it doesn't really matter whether I'm wrong or right. All that matters is that I stay on top of the beat and bring you guys the best information I can about the teams you pull for. The prediction stuff — both yours and mine — is just for fun.

All summer, I was asked, almost daily, how many games KU would win. All summer, I said they'd be better. Any time I did, the automatic question that followed was this: Where are the wins going to come from? Well, here's one scenario and I'm fully aware that it could be woefully wrong. Again, I'm OK with that.

But, crazy or not, I think if you squint hard enough you can see how six wins could be possible.

Here's a look:

• Sept. 6 vs. Southeast Missouri State — Win — I think KU rolls in its opener and sets the stage for a season of good things to come. Montell Cozart gets the offense going and they continue to take steps forward both in terms of confidence and production each week. Be sure to check out our Pick-6 blog for my exact score as well as the predictions of the rest of our staff. (1-0)

• Sept. 13 at Duke — Win — Duke's a good team that had a great season a year ago and offers a stiff challenge for the Jayhawks or any team it faces this year. But this is not 2013 and the Blue Devils will not sneak up on anybody this time around, least of all Kansas. This, to me, is the make-or-break game of the schedule for KU. If they can go win this one — and I can't see any reason why they can't; not won't but can't — then confidence soars and they return home with a chance to improve to 3-0 and really get some momentum going. (2-0)

• Sept. 20 vs. Central Michigan — Win — This is another quality team and the Jayhawks will have to do much more than just show up. But buoyed by the sudden-and-surprising support of the home crowd and their 2-0 start, I've got KU handling CMU to improve to 3-0 for the first time since 2009 and just the sixth time since 1993. (3-0)

• Sept. 27 vs. Texas — Win — It might sound crazy, but if you remember the last time the Jayhawks got the Longhorns at home, they took them down to the wire and should have won. This KU team is better than that version and I'm not sure any of us knows what Texas is yet. The time to play UT is early, while first-year coach Charlie Strong is still settling in. KU gets Strong at home for his first ever Big 12 game and, if the Jayhawks really are 3-0 at that point, this town will be buzzing and I think the Jayhawks will make the Big 12 debut miserable for someone else for a change. (4-0)

• Oct. 4 at West Virginia — Loss — The Mountaineers sure held their own against Alabama during the opening week of the college football season and they certainly won't be surprised by Kansas or Cozart this year. In fact, it's a safe bet that WVU will be gunning for payback for last year's 31-19 loss to the Jayhawks in Lawrence. With the game in Morgantown this year, I think they'll get it. (4-1)

• Oct. 11 vs. Oklahoma State — Loss — Oklahoma State is young and there's not a lot of known commodities on the roster as things stand today. That could change in time and, with quarterback J.W. Walsh running the show, I think the Cowboys will rise up around him and be a tough out for anybody this season. It certainly looked that way in their opener as they hung right there with Florida State and nearly knocked off the nation's No. 1 team. (4-2)

• Oct. 18 at Texas Tech — Loss — After a 4-0 start, you have to figure that KU will come back down to Earth and things will start to even out a little bit. That's what this game is and I give the nod to the Red Raiders simply because they'll be playing at home. If you don't like the UT pick earlier, this could be a decent game to sub in as a victory because I can't see the Jayhawks being intimidated to go play in Lubbock. (4-3)

• Oct. 25 — BYE —

• Nov. 1 at Baylor — Loss — The week off helps but not enough, as the Jayhawks go down to Baylor's new home stadium and experience first-hand why BU coach Art Briles thinks it's as good an environment as any in the nation. The Bears are crazy talented, still, and they'll be in the Big 12 race to the end. KU never has fared that well in Waco and it doesn't look like this is the year that's going to change (4-4)

• Nov. 8 vs. Iowa State — Win — Every year, people say the Jayhawks could or even should beat the Cyclones yet every season for the past four years, the Cyclones have walked away from this match-up with a victory. That streak ends at four, as the Jayhawks and all of those seniors who are still eyeing their first bowl berth, find a way to put a complete game together against ISU and ride their defense to victory. (5-4)

• Nov. 15 vs. TCU — Win — With three cracks at becoming bowl eligible remaining, the Jayhawks don't leave anything to chance or drama and pick up win No. 6 at home on senior day in convincing fashion. Worse KU teams have been right there with TCU since the Horned Frogs joined the Big 12 and this is the season they finally kick the door in and come away with the sweetest football victory Lawrence has seen since the 2008 Orange Bowl. (6-4)

• Nov. 22 at Oklahoma — Loss — The Sooners are damn good and they're even tougher at home. If KU does in fact go into Norman on the heels of gaining a sixth win and bowl eligibility, expect a letdown against a team that outmans Kansas and is still right there in the thick of the national title hunt. (6-5)

• Nov. 29 at Kansas State — Loss — The talent gap has started to close and the rivalry has started to heat up oh so slightly, but the Wildcats still have Bill Snyder and Bill Snyder still refuses to lose to Kansas. I think this could be the best Sunflower Showdown game we've seen in a while, but K-State prevails in a wild one. (6-6).

So there it is. Call me crazy. I'm fine with that. But I also believe that this team and this season really can be different. It's also worth noting that I won't be shocked for a second if it's not.

I made these picks by counting on a few things happening for the Jayhawks this fall: I think quarterback Montell Cozart will be good; I think the players around him will be better than that; I think the defense again will be solid and, more importantly, on the field less; and I think first-year offensive coordinator John Reagan is both sharp enough to call games that put KU in position to succeed and skilled enough to run an offense that masks KU's biggest question mark and that's the offensive line.

If any one of those things breaks down, the Jayhawks and these picks are in trouble. But if all of those factors hold up and KU stays healthy, I don't think it's crazy to say that six wins is within reach.

After all, stranger things have happened.

“If you would have asked me before the 2007 season if I thought we were going to be 12-1 and going to the Orange Bowl, that would have been a tough prediction,” Reagan said earlier this week. “I do think this – I think the first time I talked to Coach Weis about the job and the first time I talked to (DC) Clint (Bowen) about it when the opportunity came up, I think the foundation was set and I think that is what is important. I think our players are willing to work hard and put in the time, they believe in the direction we are headed. When you have that you at least have what you need to get started and hopefully we are going to be a better football team because of that.”

Time will tell. I'm just glad it's here so we can find out.

Enjoy the season. Win, lose or draw, I do think this will be one of the more fun KU football seasons we've seen in a while.

Oh, and in case you haven't seen it yet, check out our debut episode of "KU Sports Extra," our new weekly video show with Tom Keegan and me talking all things KU with a few other wrinkles thrown in.

http://www2.kusports.com/videos/2014/sep/05/35967/?c=2435798

Reply

Three & Out with Southeast Missouri State…

• KANSAS JAYHAWKS (0-0) vs. SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE REDHAWKS (1-0) •
— 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, Memorial Stadium, Lawrence, KS —

Three and out, with SEMO...

1st Down

Before moving on to the match-up with Kansas, let's look back at a couple of the more notable accomplishments from SEMO's 77-0 season-opening victory over Missouri Baptist last week.

• With 77 points, the Redhawks posted their highest total in franchise history since joining Division I in 1991.

• Southeast notched its first shutout over a non-conference opponent in the program’s Division I era. The last shutout overall was at Austin Peay on Nov. 1, 1997 and tonight’s effort marked the third shutout Southeast has registered since joining the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA).

• The Redhawks racked up 516 yards of total offense, the most since totaling 537 yards at Murray State in 2012. Southeast rushed for 304 yards and posted eight rushing TDs. They averaged 7.6 yards per rush.

• Southeast set a team record by holding Missouri Baptist to 81 total yards of offense, shattering the previous low of 137 yards allowed vs. Sam Houston State (9/11/93).

2nd Down

The Jayhawks aren't the only ones interested in wild and new uniform combinations. First-year SEMO coach Tom Matukewicz, the former defensive coordinator at Toledo, recently unveiled a brand new helmet that it plans to wear for Saturday's game against the Jayhawks.

Off white with the heavy red outline of the school's mascot and red facemask, the helmet is basically the inverse of what the Redhawks wore in the season opener, black helmet with red and black Redhawk mascot.

There's no doubt that these things tend to fire up the players. That's certainly been the case at Kansas, dating all the way back to the red jerseys worn during the Orange Bowl seasons, the all-black look they wore against Iowa State a couple of years ago and the newly unveiled Crimson Chrome uniform that will be worn at some point this season.

Here's a look at SEMO's new helmet.

The new SEMO helmet that the Redhawks will wear Saturday vs. Kansas. Photo courtesy of Southeast Missouri State athletics.

The new SEMO helmet that the Redhawks will wear Saturday vs. Kansas. Photo courtesy of Southeast Missouri State athletics. by Matt Tait

3rd Down

Southeast Missouri State is 1-18 all-time vs. FBS opponents, with the lone victory coming via a 24-14 triumph over Middle Tennessee in 2002. Of those 19 games, just one came against a Big 12 foe, with Missouri rocking the Redhawks, 52-3, in 2008. Other notable names on SEMO's FBS list include: Hawaii, Marshall, Ohio, Central Michigan, Arkansas, Cincinnati twice, Purdue and Ole Miss last season.

You can look at this two ways: 1. SEMO struggles with upper-level talent. 2. Because they've played FBS foes every year since 2000, they're used to it and won't be intimidated by this week's Big 12 opponent.

Punt

While SEMO quarterback Kyle Snyder returns to give the Redhawks a steady, veteran presence, it's the players around him that make the SEMO offense dangerous.

Surrounded by weapons, Snyder has plenty of options in the offense, many of whom can turn innocent plays into big gains in a hurry. Snyder in the opener, showed he could make some plays, as well, running for two touchdowns and throwing for 198 yards and two touchdowns.

• Running back DeMichael Jackson (No. 20) had a huge game last week, accounting for 148 total yards, including a 66-yard touchdown on a screen pass and a 25-yard TD run.

• Paul McRoberts and Spencer Davis are the two biggest weapons at wide receiver, with KU coach Charlie Weis calling the 5-foot-7, 182-pound Davis “their big play guy.” Davis ripped off a career-best 61-yard punt return early in the victory.

• The Redhawks have a two-headed monster at tight end, with Logan Larson being your more typical tight end and Ron Coleman being a wildcard. Coleman is a converted running back and he lines up all over the field, at fullback, tight end, H-Back and others.

Reply

Heeney lives up to wild man reputation at Kauffman Stadium

Sunday was KU night at the K, where the Kansas City Royals hosted the Cleveland Indians as part of ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball national broadcast.

Before the Royals and Indians took the field, the Jayhawks held court at Kauffman Stadium, entertaining hundreds of KU fans with autographs, high fives and handshakes prior to game time.

However, the no-brainer highlight of KU's appearance at the K came during the ceremonial first pitch when senior linebacker Ben Heeney threw high and tight on Big Jay and beaned him in the head. KU receiver Nick Harwell was out there to be Heeney's catcher and was the intended target, but Heeney's fastball got away from him and Big Jay went down.

KU put together a nice video of the team's time at Kauffman. Included in the autograph line at the K were: Heeney, Harwell and fellow captain Cassius Sendish along with quarterback Montell Cozart, defensive lineman Keon Stowers and offensive lineman Pat Lewandowski as well as head coach Charlie Weis, defensive coordinator Clint Bowen and offensive coordinator John Reagan.

Here's a look at the video...

And here's a quick look at some of the reaction from the players following KU night at the K...

Reply