Entries from blogs tagged with “Tale of the Tait”

What caught my eye at Wednesday’s KU football practice: Nov. 12

Wednesday's KU football practice was one that closely resembled what the game time temperatures are expected to be this weekend when the Jayhawks and TCU Horned Frogs kick off at 2 p.m. Saturday.

Biting winds that dropped the temperature to around 12 degrees made Wednesday a little different than most of the other practices the Jayhawks have had this season, and, although most adjusted accordingly there, there were a few warriors among the bunch out there today.

While most players bundled up with long sleeves and tights to stay warm, a few guys went with short sleeves and shorts just like it was a normal September practice.

The ones I saw who bared all were: Kyle Pullia, Mike Smithburg, Jordan Shelley-Smith and Preston Randall. Go figure, three of the four were offensive linemen. Props to those guys. I stood out there for about 40 minutes and even bundled up in a coat and gloves, it was cold. (I was an idiot and forgot a hat or hood of any kind, so I was toughing it out a little bit).

Anyway, all of this might seem irrelevant, but it really might not be. The high temperature in Fort Worth, Texas, on Wednesday was 45 degrees. While not exactly warm, that was about 30 degrees warmer than what the guys in Lawrence were dealing with. And with afternoon temperatures the next two days hovering around the same mark, it's definitely possible that the game day temperatures expected to be in the high teens — with a 90 percent chance for snow, by the way — could have a much bigger impact on TCU's roster, which includes 79 native Texans, than KU's, which has been practicing in weather like that all week.

We'll see. A heavy dose of snow would make it interesting for both offenses, but, if you're KU, you'll take that trade off because it could even the playing field a little bit.

Here's a quick look at what else caught my eye at Wednesday's practice:

• Joe Dineen may very well have a new position yet again. The freshman from Free State High was working with the linebackers on Wednesday, this after he moved from safety to running back during preseason camp after the Jayhawks lost Brandon Bourbon and Taylor Cox to season-ending injuries. It's hard to know what this means for Dineen's future, without talking to him or KU coach Clint Bowen, but there was some talk before he even signed with KU about the potential for the 6-foot-2, 208-pound Dineen to move to linebacker in the future. Good to see him getting a look there late in the season. Either way, I think his future's on defense.

• Keon Stowers, Andrew Bolton and De'Andre Mann all were practicing and appeared to be going full speed through the drills I saw. That bodes well for KU's lineup this weekend. Still waiting for more information on offensive lineman Ngalu Fusimalohi. We might not fully know his status until game time.

• Maybe it was just their way of combatting the cold, but the coaches, including Bowen, had an extra dose of intensity on Wednesday. Probably not worth reading too much into, but that's one thing that always has impressed me about this coaching staff — no matter who the opponent is or what their odds are for the upcoming game (and remember they are playing the No. 5 team in the country this weekend), the coaches prepare like they'll be right there and like they have a great shot. That kind of mentality rubs off on the players and can become the foundation of a program.

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The Day After: Dominating Emporia State

Kansas teammates Wayne Selden (1) and Jamari Traylor (31) celebrate a three pointer from reserve Evan Manning against Emporia State during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Kansas teammates Wayne Selden (1) and Jamari Traylor (31) celebrate a three pointer from reserve Evan Manning against Emporia State during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. by Nick Krug

Another exhibition season is in the books for the Kansas University men's basketball team and like most exhibition seasons that came before it, the Jayhawks learned a little, questioned a lot and got a few of the kinks worked out before kicking off the regular season against tougher competition and under more intense conditions.

KU coach Bill Self made no secret of the fact that he does not put too much stock into what happens in these exhibition games and he made it clear that he's not an easy guy to impress in games like this, where the Jayhawks are far superior to their opponent in size, speed, depth and overall talent.

Take Tuesday's effort by freshman forward Cliff Alexander, for example, in KU's 109-56 victory over Emporia State.

Self said Alexander did not play well enough to score the 12 points he did, but got most of his buckets off of easy dunks and nice efforts by his teammates to set him up.

That's not to say he doesn't get some credit for his 12 points and 6 rebounds in 13 minutes, but it's also not to say he's the early leader for national freshman of the year. Somewhere in between is more likely.

I said it after the last game and I think it holds true after this one as well. The most important part of the exhibition schedule is not to see what kinds of numbers guys can put up but how guys play together, how they perform in front of a live crowd and how ready they are for the season. There were plenty of good moments and bad in both exhibition games, but the real answers to those questions will become a little clearer starting Friday night.

Quick takeaway

In addition to all of the nit-picky coaching ploys, Self also pointed out perhaps the most important aspect of these exhibition games and that's that they give the young guys a chance to have some success and gain some confidence. Very few of KU's games, if any, will be as easy as Tuesday night's game was, but Alexander, Devonte' Graham, Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk, Kelly Oubre and even guys like Hunter Mickelson and Landen Lucas were able to experience domination, finishing plays and feeling the love from the Allen Fieldhouse faithful. It may sound ridiculous to say those types of things are an adjustment, but even the good things take some getting used to and these young Jayhawks now have had a small taste.

Kansas head coach Bill Self takes a knee to talk with some of the freshman during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Kansas head coach Bill Self takes a knee to talk with some of the freshman during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to smile:

1 – Any time you can put eight guys in double figures, that's a good night. I don't care who it comes against. And here's why: It proves that you've got an unselfish team that plays together and plays for the best/right shots, not just a bunch of individuals looking to get theirs. Any number of these guys probably could've scored 30 last night, but their unselfishness — and, of course, the substitution pattern — spread the wealth and allowed a lot of guys to leave the gym feeling good about their efforts instead of just two or three.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene slaps hands with teammate Hunter Mickelson after a turnover by Emporia State during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene slaps hands with teammate Hunter Mickelson after a turnover by Emporia State during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. by Nick Krug

2 – Brannen Greene looked incredibly active on the offensive end, both in terms of looking for his shot and going after the offensive boards and loose balls. This was a great sign for two reasons: 1. Greene's coming off of a head injury and looked to be fine. 2. The more he can “plug himself in” to all aspects of the game and not just float around as a shooter/scorer, the greater his chances become of being a regular part of the rotation.

3 – KU drastically improved its free throw shooting in this one, which was pretty much a lock to predict but still good to see. After knocking in just 50 percent from the line against Washburn last week, the Jayhawks hit 25 of 32 free throws (78 percent) vs. Emporia State and looked a lot less rusty every time they stepped to the line. They focused on this a little in practice and, clearly it worked, but Self has always said he's never been a big fan of spending too much practice time on free throw shooting so it's clear that these guys took it as a personal challenge to improve the stat.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander delivers on a dunk past Emporia State guard Jay Temaat during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander delivers on a dunk past Emporia State guard Jay Temaat during the second half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to sigh:

1 – Self said it and we already alluded to it above, but Cliff Alexander clearly was a little off against the Hornets. Maybe he was just trying too hard or pressing too much, but after sitting for nearly the first 10 minutes of the game, Alexander came in and missed a shot he forced, traveled on another possession and picked up two quick fouls. He eventually settled down and rocked the rim a few times to finish with a pretty good line, but the thing worth focusing on was not his numbers against inferior talent but why he sat so long before coming in.

2 – Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk started but did not do much to take advantage of the opportunity. He missed four of five shots — which happens — and picked up three boards, two turnovers and two assists in 18 minutes. He looks great at times, especially defensively and any time he releases a jumper, but also did not go all-out after a few loose balls and looked a little sloppy handling the ball. It wouldn't surprise me for a second if this was just because of the nerves associated with starting for the first time. These guys are all still young, but especially Mykhailiuk.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk defends against Emporia State guard Tyler Jordan during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk defends against Emporia State guard Tyler Jordan during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. by Nick Krug

3 – The Jayhawks dominated the glass — 45-29 — but still gave up 10 offensive boards to an undersized ESU team. Some of them were just loose ball pick-ups and the like, but there were a couple of moments, especially in the first half, when the Hornets got second- and third-chance opportunities.

One for the road:

KU's 109-56 runaway victory over Emporia State...

• Made Kansas 65-9 in exhibition games.

• Extended KU’s home exhibition winning streak to 42 games, dating back to the 1994 season.

• Upped Kansas’ all-time record against Emporia State to 20-3 in favor of the Jayhawks, including 7-0 in exhibition games.

• Improved head coach Bill Self to a 33-2 record in exhibition games at Kansas, including 24-0 in home exhibition contests.

• Made KU 56-4 in exhibition games inside Allen Fieldhouse.

Next up

The Jayhawks officially will open the 2014-15 season Friday night at 7 p.m. against UC-Santa Barbara at Allen Fieldhouse.

By the numbers: Kansas vs. Emporia State, Nov. 11, 2014

By the numbers: Kansas vs. Emporia State, Nov. 11, 2014

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The Day After: A memorable win over Iowa State

Kansas interim head football coach Clint Bowen gets a bear hug from his player Michael Reynolds following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas interim head football coach Clint Bowen gets a bear hug from his player Michael Reynolds following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

Saturday afternoon marked just the ninth victory in the career of KU linebacker Ben Heeney and the senior captain could not have cared less about it because it felt like a million bucks.

The biggest reason for that, Heeney said, was because it marked interim head coach Clint Bowen's first career victory as the KU leader and that's something these players have been battling for since Bowen took over for Charlie Weis in late September.

That was by far the biggest storyline on Saturday night, as the statistics, big-time plays, ebbs and flows of the game tiny details all took a backseat to Bowen's big win. Players, staff members, fans and family celebrated the victory with great joy and, although some probably thought the whole scene was a bit of overkill given the fact that the win came against a 2-7 team, nobody in crimson and blue was apologizing for it and you can't take away the fact that the Jayhawks played very well from the opening whistle to secure their third victory of the season.

The road gets harder from here — flat-out frightening, in fact — but several guys said last year's upset win over West Virginia that snapped a 27-game Big 12 losing skid breathed new life into the program and helped them approach the final weeks of the season with new hope and confidence. It didn't wind up mattering, but that team wasn't led by Bowen.

Kansas offensive lineman Mike Smithburg hoists up tight end Jimmay Mundine after Mundine's touchdown against Iowa State during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas offensive lineman Mike Smithburg hoists up tight end Jimmay Mundine after Mundine's touchdown against Iowa State during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway

The Jayhawks beat a bad football team on Saturday afternoon, but they did so convincingly and were clearly the better, more confident, more talented football team. The way things have gone for Kansas football lately, bad team or not, a win is worth celebrating, particularly when that win comes as a result of the Jayhawks playing well. They did so in just about every facet of the game on Saturday and showed a little glimpse into why they had such high hopes for this season when it began two months ago.

Kansas football fans cheer interim head coach Clint Bowen as he leaves the field following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas football fans cheer interim head coach Clint Bowen as he leaves the field following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to smile

1 – Because everyone else was. The haters, skeptics, die-hard fans and cautiously optimistic followers of the KU football program all saw eye-to-eye for a few minutes after Saturday's 34-14 victory over Iowa State. The mistakes didn't matter, the scary moments in the third quarter were irrelevant and the nasty schedule that lies ahead was not on anyone's mind. All that mattered was the joy and smiles and celebrations on the field, in the locker room and around the stadium for a group of players, coaches and fans who absolutely deserved an outcome like the one they got on Saturday. I'm sure the differing viewpoints have sorted themselves out again by now, but at least for a while, everyone involved with KU football had a chance to be on the same winning page.

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen celebrates a defensive stop with cornerback Dexter McDonald against Iowa State during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen celebrates a defensive stop with cornerback Dexter McDonald against Iowa State during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

2 – The KU defense was nasty and guys not named Ben Heeney made plays all over the place. Sure, Heeney led the team with seven tackles and played his usual all-over-the-place type of game, but half a dozen other guys on the KU defense out-shined their leader in this one and that made things nearly impossible for the Cyclones. JaCorey Shepherd (5 tackles, 5 pass break-ups, 1 interception) was as good as he's ever been, Dexter McDonald held up his end of the bargain on the other side of the field, Victor Simmons (2 sacks, 1 forced fumble, 1 fumble recovery, 1 pass break-up) had the game of his life, Jake Love had a sack and a pass break-up, Courtney Arnick had five tackles, one for a loss and two pass break-ups and Michael Reynolds had another sack and forced fumble and continued his stellar streak of games. In short, this defense played the way you would expect to see from a defense that listed “being the top defense” in the Big 12 as one of its goals before the season began. Sure, it was against a struggling offense and their back-up quarterback, but they still delivered time after time after time.

3 – KU's offense featured all kinds of play-makers, but few were as impressive as junior receiver Nigel King. King finished with 101 yards on five receptions and made arguably the biggest catch of the game, a 42-yard grab on third-and-19 that set up a touchdown that pushed KU's lead from 24-14 to 31-14 and essentially served as the knockout blow. King got open all afternoon, was tough to bring down and used his incredibly strong hands to rip the ball out of the air when it came his way. The Jayhawks are losing a lot of offensive players from this year's team, but having King back next season will be huge.

Kansas receiver Nigel King is forced out of bounds after a catch against Iowa State defensive back Sam Richardson during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas receiver Nigel King is forced out of bounds after a catch against Iowa State defensive back Sam Richardson during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to sigh

1 – Senior offensive lineman Ngalu Fusimalohi left the game with some sort of right leg injury and it's not yet known how serious the injury is. The last place the Jayhawks can afford to lose a starter is on the offensive line, but that's especially true of Fusimalohi, who has started every game since arriving in Lawrence and is one of the Jayhawks' strongest players in the trenches.

2 – KU's kickoff return game still looks sub-par. JaCorey Shepherd is a dynamic player and a great athlete and I can't imagine that the Jayhawks' issues here rest with him. It just seems that every time the Jayhawks return a kickoff they struggle mightily to get it back to the 20 yard line, and that's whether they take it from the goal line or the 6 or 7. It doesn't make sense. But it has to be some sort of breakdown in the blocking in front of Shepherd because he almost always runs into a wall of three or four coverage guys before reaching the 20.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings heaves a pass over the Iowa State defense during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings heaves a pass over the Iowa State defense during the first quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

3 – It's easy to look at what Michael Cummings has done in the past four or five games and be happy for the guy and impressed by his ability, toughness and heart. It's equally as easy to look at Cummings and exhale violently when it hits you that, if just given a chance, this guy could have been a difference maker for the past couple of KU teams. Cummings isn't the best quarterback in the league and he'll never catch your eye as someone you desperately want to have as your quarterback, but he's a gamer and he's been considerably better in the past five weeks than anything KU's put out there in a long time and you can't help but wonder how much farther along he'd be if he'd been given this kind of chance a little earlier.

One for the road

Saturday's 34-14 victory over Iowa State...

• Pushed KU into a tie for eighth place in the Big 12 standings with Texas Tech. The Red Raiders own the tiebreaker and neither eighth or ninth place is worth bragging about, but it would be a small sign of progress.

• Improved KU's lead in the series to 50-38-6, including a 28-16-3 advantage in games played in Lawrence.

• Moved Kansas to 579-595-58 all-time.

• Gave KU just its third Big 12 Conference victory in the post-Mark Mangino era (41 games).

Next up

KU will face arguably its biggest test of the season when No. 6 TCU comes to town for a 2 p.m. kickoff at Memorial Stadium and what will be the final home game in the careers of some pretty memorable KU seniors.

Kansas University football fans march with and upright to Potter Lake following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas University football fans march with and upright to Potter Lake following the Jayhawks' 34-14 win over the Cyclones on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

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Steven Johnson to make it a trio of former Jayhawks starting in Denver

Former Kansas player and current Denver Bronco Steven Johnson catches up with Louie Matsakis, director of personnel on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Former Kansas player and current Denver Bronco Steven Johnson catches up with Louie Matsakis, director of personnel on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

When the Denver Broncos, fresh off of last week's whipping at the hands of the New England Patriots, line up for the first defensive play of this weekend's game against Oakland, 27 percent of their starting lineup will be former Jayhawks.

Although Chris Harris and Aqib Talib — both on the Pro Bowl ballot — already are fixtures in the Broncos' starting lineup, the former KU standouts will make room to share the spotlight with linebacker Steven Johnson, a third-year pro who has played primarily special teams since joining the Broncos as an undrafted free agent.

The Denver Post is reporting that Johnson will start in Nate Irving's spot at middle linebacker, as Irving left last week's loss with an injury and is expected to miss some time. Johnson has been in the Broncos' plans at LB for the past couple of years but mostly in a role as a luxury to have a guy like him for depth purposes. When asked to play, Johnson has delivered, but this weekend figures to be his first true crack at proving himself as a regular in the NFL.

While making the leap from seldom-used reserve to starter on a team vying for a second consecutive trip to the Super Bowl could be overwhelming, at least one Bronco believes Johnson is ready and has been ready for the moment for a while.

"Stevey Johnson is going to be able to get the job done," Harris told The Denver Post. "He's been in our defense going on three years now. He has experience in there. He's been waiting for his shot. Now he has his shot. We've been needing him on special teams since he's been hurt, but now he has a shot to play and he has a chance to show what he can do."

For more on Johnson's likely move into the starting lineup, check out Post writer Mike Klis' report from Monday.

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What caught my eye at Wednesday’s KU football practice: Nov. 5

As has been the case throughout the past few weeks, interim KU coach Clint Bowen kicked off Wednesday's practice with a visit from a former Jayhawk. And this one meant a little more to Bowen than some of the others.

Charley Bowen, the older brother of the interim KU coach, was given the opportunity to talk to the team before Wednesday's practice and it was very clear by observing the head coach's actions that he was fired up for his big brother to speak to his squad.

During his introduction, Bowen highlighted a few of his brother's accolades — 44 starts, all-Big Eight honors, etc. — and then gave an inspired welcome as Charley stepped into the huddle to address the team.

After sharing a few words, most of which had to do with life after football and maximizing the opportunity these players had today, Charley was greeted by a rousing ovation, a few hugs and an energetic start to practice.

Charley told me it was the first time since 1992 that he had been on the practice field at Memorial Stadium. The only other KU practice he's been able to attend since then was in Arizona during the days leading up to the Insight Bowl in 2008.

Asked if being back on the field made him miss his playing days, Charley smiled and said simply, “You always miss it.”

Here's a quick look at a few other things that caught my eye at Wednesday's practice as the Jayhawks continued preparations for Saturday's 2:30 p.m. showdown with Iowa State:

• Senior defensive tackle Keon Stowers did not practice, but was on the field and did all he could to be a part of the action. Unlike his teammates in pads, Stowers wore only shorts and a jersey, but that did not stop him from coaching up the guys who were out there getting the reps in his place. Whether it was during individual drills or during team action, Stowers always found time to offer a helping hand and seemed fully engaged in every aspect, just as if he would've been out there. Bowen said earlier this week that the team was hopeful that Stowers would play Saturday and it sounds as if that's still the case. The good news there? Stowers is such a veteran with so many games under his belt that he could probably miss most of practice and still get out there on Saturday provided he's physically ready.

• It's hard to say what to make of it, but senior tight end Trent Smiley ran some with the first team offense during Wednesday's practice. Known among KU's tight ends as a strong blocker, Smiley lined up in the backfield, at his regular tight end spot and on both sides of the formation during the portion of practice when he ran with the ones.

• As was reflected on this week's updated depth chart, sophomore linebacker Courtney Arnick ran with the first team defense in place of Jake Love, who has been dealing with an injury. Love practiced and should get plenty of reps and play plenty of snaps on Saturday, but Arnick is quietly putting together a pretty strong season. Arnick all of a sudden has the look of a player the Jayhawks will be fortunate to have back in the lineup in 2015. Should be interesting to see how strongly he finishes the final third of this year's schedule.

• Defensive backs coach Dave Campo was very vocal during Wednesday's practice and most of what Campo barked about had to do with the vision of his DBs. “Get your eyes right,” Campo continually yelled during one drill. During another, he simply yelled at one of his DBs, “Get your eyes off of him (the quarterback) and worry about your man.” Nothing Earth-shattering here, of course, but it's cool to see these types of little details emphasized on this level.

• Finally, in case you missed NY Giants WR Odell Beckham Jr., doing his one-handed pregame routine during the Monday Night Football game last week, check out the video below. It's become sort of a viral video and on Wednesday a couple of Jayhawks were attempting to match the moves. One who came the closest, believe it or not, was Buck Michael Reynolds. Could an INT be in Reynolds' future this week???

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOler9B8Oc8&feature=youtu.be

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Jayhawks among NCAA title favorites for 2014-15 season

It happens this way almost every year. As soon as the first exhibition game arrives and fans of Kansas University hoops get their first vision of the Jayhawks beating up an overmatched opponent inside Allen Fieldhouse, their minds wander toward the idea of whether this will be the year that Bill Self and company add another banner to the rafters.

Truth be told, this general way of thinking is really never absent around here, but it really revs up when the games begin and people can see for themselves just how dominant Cliff Alexander can be, athletic Kelly Oubre is and improved Frank Mason has become.

It's human nature, really. But there is, of course, a pseudo-scientific element to the question and that's where the good folks at online gambling site Bovada.lv enter the picture.

With the regular season opener now less than 10 days away — KU will play another tune-up next Tuesday against Emporia State at AFH — here's a quick look at the betting favorites to cut down the nets next April.

Somewhat surprisingly, KU's odds have gone down since they first released them last April. If anything, they've gone up in my mind, as this team appears to have the depth, talent, size and, of course, coaching to make a serious run.

Plenty of time to sort all that out, though. For now, here's a look at the Bovada odds as they stood as of Tuesday.

• Big 12 teams in italics

Team ---- Odds on April 28 ---- Current Odds
Kentucky ---- 5/1 ---- 7/2
Arizona ---- 16/1 ---- 9/1
Wisconsin ---- 12/1 ---- 9/1
Duke ---- 9/1 ---- 12/1
North Carolina ---- 16/1 ---- 12/1
Kansas ---- 14/1 ---- 18/1
Florida ---- 16/1 ---- 20/1
Gonzaga ---- 40/1 ---- 25/1
Iowa State ---- 33/1 ---- 25/1
Louisville ---- 25/1 ---- 25/1
Texas ---- 33/1 ---- 25/1
Villanova ---- 25/1 ---- 28/1
Wichita State ---- 28/1 ---- 28/1
Michigan ---- 33/1 ---- 33/1
Michigan State ---- 25/1 ---- 33/1
Syracuse ---- 33/1 ---- 40/1
VCU ---- 40/1 ---- 40/1
Virginia ---- 33/1 ---- 40/1
Ohio State ---- 50/1 ---- 50/1
San Diego State ---- 66/1 ---- 50/1
SMU ---- 33/1 ---- 50/1
UConn ---- 66/1 ---- 50/1
Iowa ---- 66/1 ---- 66/1
Oklahoma ---- 40/1 ---- 66/1
UCLA ---- 50/1 ---- 66/1
Pittsburgh ---- 100/1 ---- 75/1
Arkansas ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Baylor ---- 75/1 ---- 100/1
Florida State ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Georgetown ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Harvard ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Indiana ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Kansas State ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Marquette ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Maryland ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Memphis ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Miami FL ---- 66/1 ---- 100/1
Minnesota ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Nebraska ---- 66/1 ---- 100/1
Notre Dame ---- 150/1 ---- 100/1
Oregon ---- 50/1 ---- 100/1
Seton Hall ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
St. Louis ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Stanford ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Tennessee ---- 100/1 ---- 100/1
Cincinnati ---- 100/1 ---- 150/1
Providence ---- 150/1 ---- 150/1
UNLV ---- 100/1 ---- 150/1
Alabama ---- 200/1 ---- 200/1
Colorado ---- 75/1 ---- 200/1
Dayton ---- 100/1 ---- 200/1
Georgia ---- 100/1 ---- 200/1
Illinois ---- 150/1 ---- 200/1
Missouri ---- 100/1 ---- 200/1
NC State ---- 150/1 ---- 200/1
New Mexico ---- 200/1 ---- 200/1
Oklahoma State ---- 100/1 ---- 200/1
St. John's ---- 150/1 ---- 200/1
Xavier ---- 250/1 ---- 250/1
Arizona State ---- 100/1 ---- 300/1
Auburn ---- Off the Board ---- 300/1
BYU ---- 300/1 ---- 300/1
California ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
Clemson ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
Colorado State ---- 300/1 ---- 300/1
Creighton ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
George Washington ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
Georgia Tech ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
LSU ---- 100/1 ---- 300/1
Ole Miss ---- 150/1 ---- 300/1
Purdue ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
South Carolina ---- 300/1 ---- 300/1
Texas A&M ---- 500/1 ---- 300/1
UMass ---- 150/1 ---- 300/1
USC ---- 200/1 ---- 300/1
Vanderbilt ---- 250/1 ---- 300/1
Boston College ---- 500/1 ---- 500/1
Butler ---- 500/1 ---- 500/1
DePaul ---- 500/1 ---- 500/1
LaSalle ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
Penn State ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
Richmond ---- 500/1 ---- 500/1
St. Joe's ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
Texas Tech ---- 500/1 ---- 500/1
Virginia Tech ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
Wake Forest ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
Washington ---- 300/1 ---- 500/1
West Virginia ---- 200/1 ---- 500/1

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The Day After: Running over Washburn

The Kansas student section explodes prior to tipoff against Washburn as Jayhawk basketball season begins on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

The Kansas student section explodes prior to tipoff against Washburn as Jayhawk basketball season begins on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

No Andrew Wiggins, no Joel Embiid, no Naadir Tharpe? No problem.

Monday night, the new-look Kansas University men's basketball team unofficially got its season off to a strong start with an 85-53 victory over Washburn in its exhibition season opener.

Fifteen different Jayhawks played, 11 of them received minutes in the first half and several of the new guys KU fans were looking forward to seeing made impressive debuts.

For those keeping track at home, Frank Mason, Devonte' Graham, Wayne Selden, Perry Ellis and Jamari Traylor made up KU's starting lineup, but freshmen Cliff Alexander, Kelly Oubre and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk played plenty of minutes and made impressive debuts.

It's unwise to try to take too much away from a game like this, but it was good to see a few of the new guys actually play in a game setting and enough happened — both good and bad — to get at least a small feel for where this team is heading into the 2014-15 season.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre pulls back on a breakaway dunk against Washburn during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre pulls back on a breakaway dunk against Washburn during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway

Yes, it was just an exhibition game against an overmatched opponent, but it still was hard not to marvel at all of that quality depth this KU team has. Whether you go position by position, unit by unit or first five and second five, KU coach Bill Self has some incredible options and flexibility that not only should help ensure that the Jayhawks can put guys on the floor each night who are locked in, but also should create some serious competition for playing time and improvement throughout the season.

Three reasons to smile

1 – Cliff Alexander came out and played with a ton of confidence and effectiveness. He was almost always the biggest dude on the floor when he was out there, so that helped, but it wasn't so much his numbers — 14 points, 9 rebounds, 3 blocks in 17 minutes — that impressed as the way he got them. He was efficient, he played with passion, he showed great work ethic and some skills other than the power everyone already expected to see, most notably good hands and an ability to run the floor. If he brings that kind of effort every night — which will be tougher against better opponents — it's hard to see him starting many games on the bench.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander pins a shot by Washburn forward Jeremy Licktieg against the glass during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. Alexander was called for a foul on the play.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander pins a shot by Washburn forward Jeremy Licktieg against the glass during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. Alexander was called for a foul on the play. by Nick Krug

2 – One year after having pretty limited options for much of the season, KU's depth appears to be back at the level the Jayhawks are used to. And that's without Conner Frankamp on the roster any longer. Self has so many options and so many lineups he can use and I can only imagine how much he enjoys that. What's more, though, that kind of depth helps keep Kansas in a position where fresh bodies are on the floor at all times. Washburn coach Bob Chipman talked about that after the game, specifically with regard to KU's defense. He said having the luxury of such incredible and talented depth really allows the guys on the floor to get after it defensively, without worrying about foul trouble or fatigue. Think of this Kansas team as a hockey squad, where short shifts and line changes are the norm and the guys go 100 percent at all times when they're out there.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis heads to the bucket between Washburn defenders Alex North, left, and Stephon Drane during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis heads to the bucket between Washburn defenders Alex North, left, and Stephon Drane during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

3 – It looks like Perry Ellis may be a legitimate three-point threat. Ellis took three shots from downtown in this one, and made just one, but it was the way the shots came and not his success rate that was most impressive. Each time Ellis pulled the trigger, he did so without hesitation. The shots were there, he was side open and he stepped up and shot. If this is a more regular part of the junior big man's arsenal this year, it's only going to make the rest of his game that much more dangerous, regardless of the rate at which his three-point attempts are going in.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – KU shot just 50 percent from the free throw line in this one, knocking in 16 of 32 attempts. It wasn't a catastrophe because the score was so lopsided throughout the night that the Jayhawks did not need to have great success at the line to hold off the Ichabods. But it's still not the kind of performance anyone wants to see. Maybe the fact that the lead was so large had something to do with it and kept the Jayhawks from locking in on their free throw attempts. And maybe, as Self seemed inclined to believe, it was just first-game rust. Either way, it's worth keeping an eye on as the season gets started.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander tosses up a shot between Washburn defenders Kevin House and Alex North during the first half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. At left is KU forward Perry Ellis.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander tosses up a shot between Washburn defenders Kevin House and Alex North during the first half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. At left is KU forward Perry Ellis. by Nick Krug

2 – Self said after the game that he was unimpressed by the way his big guys rebounded in this one. Considering Alexander had nine boards and Landen Lucas had six, I can only assume he was talking to Perry Ellis and Jamari Traylor here, who combined for five boards, with Ellis grabbing just one. It hardly merits all-out concern, especially when you consider that two of Traylor's four rebounds were on the offensive glass and led to five Kansas points, but it probably wasn't as much the specific outing as the overall tone that Self was addressing with his comments. Look for Ellis to emphasize the glass next time out.

3 – You never want to see guys get injured, but especially not in games like these. Kansas was not so lucky on Monday night, as sophomore Brannen Greene suffered a concussion after getting crushed by a screen. The extent of the concussion is not yet known, but Self said he could not imagine Greene practicing for at least the next couple of days. Talk about a bad break. Just as Greene had put himself in position to be the first perimeter player off the bench, he now has to sit for a few days, which, on a team with this much depth and talent, could have a big impact on his future minutes.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene grimaces after taking some contact from a Washburn player during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene grimaces after taking some contact from a Washburn player during the second half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

One for the road

The Jayhawks' exhibition victory over Washburn on Monday night...

• Made Kansas 64-9 in exhibition games.

• Extended KU's home exhibition winning streak to 41 games, dating back to the 1994 season.

• Upped Kansas' all-time record against Washburn to 37-3 in favor of the Jayhawks, including 6-0 in exhibition games.

• Improved head coach Bill Self to a 32-2 record in exhibition games at Kansas, including 23-0 in home exhibition contests.

• Made KU 55-4 in exhibition games inside Allen Fieldhouse.

Next up

The Jayhawks will close out the exhibition portion of their schedule on Tuesday, Nov. 11, with a home match-up with Emporia State. After that, KU will kick things off for real with a Nov. 14 home game against UC-Santa Barbara. Both games tip at 7 p.m.

Kansas head coach Bill Self and guard Kelly Oubre have a chat on the sideline during the first half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas head coach Bill Self and guard Kelly Oubre have a chat on the sideline during the first half on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

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Injury update on KU football players Derrick Neal and Keon Stowers

Kansas University football officials on Sunday night released an update on the status of freshman defensive back Derrick Neal and senior defensive lineman Keon Stowers, both of whom were injured and carted off the field during Saturday's 60-14 loss at Baylor.

Both players were taken to a nearby hospital for further evaluation during Saturday's loss but nothing new was known about their status following the game.

Sunday night, the update indicated that both players had returned to Lawrence and both participated in team activities on Sunday.

Stowers, a starter on KU's D-Line, posted on his Facebook page late Saturday that he was OK and looking forward to his recovery.

Neal, a reserve defensive back who suffered what appeared to be a head injury while making a tackle on a kickoff return, was able to get to the cart under his own power before leaving the field.

KU coach Clint Bowen will be available on the Big 12 coaches teleconference Monday morning and also at his regular Tuesday news conference and at those times may provide an update on Neal and Stowers' availability for this weekend's 2:30 p.m. home game against Iowa State.

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The Day After: Blasted at Baylor

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings shows his frustration after losing a fumble to Baylor during the third quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings shows his frustration after losing a fumble to Baylor during the third quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

There's no denying that Saturday's 60-14 loss at Baylor was the first significant blow in interim head coach Clint Bowen's campaign to become the Kansas University football program's full-time head coach at the end of the season.

But the Jayhawks' shortcomings were hardly all on Bowen. Kansas committed six bonehead penalties, ran 14 plays that ended at least a few yards behind where they started and struggled to keep up with a roster that was both overmatched and outmanned.

Oh, and the Jayhawks also played a team that had as much talent as any team in the country in Baylor. How the Bears lost to West Virginia is beyond me.

How the Jayhawks lost, however, was easy to see and came in large part because this remains a team and a roster that lacks enough talent to compete at this level and still is struggling with depth at key positions.

So talented are the Bears that they neutralized what had been easy to see for the first three weeks of the Bowen era — hard work, discipline and toughness. None of the three showed up with any regularity on Saturday and that made for a long afternoon for the visiting team.

Quick takeaway

This certainly is not intended let KU or Bowen off the hook for Saturday's performance, but was anyone really that surprised by the outcome? While the Jayhawks took hope and confidence into their match-ups with West Virginia, Oklahoma State and Texas Tech — and at times competed in a way that clearly demonstrated that — this one seemed like a mismatch from the jump and it played out that way all afternoon. If anything was a surprise, it was the KU defense's ability to hold the Bears to a three-and-out on the opening possession. Unfortunately for the Jayhawks, the offense followed with a three-and-out of its own — complete with a false start penalty and two of the nine Michael Cummings incompletions — and failed to capitalize on the fast start by the defense and gain some momentum and control. The Jayhawks aren't talented enough to let those opportunities pass without a fight.

Three reasons to smile

1 – Regardless of the results, you have to continue to be impressed by what Michael Cummings has done for the KU passing game. The junior quarterback completed 21 of 30 passes for 288 yards and 2 touchdowns, despite being pressured all day and getting next to no help from the KU running game. Cummings' ability to hang in the pocket until the last minute to deliver a pass and his toughness to get up time and time again after getting blasted has helped KU take some more shots down the field and given guys like Nick Harwell and Nigel King a chance to impact the game. Asked how he does it, the QB's answer was vintage Cummings. “That's my job,” he said. “And I'm trying to do the best job I can each play at a time.” Cummings became the first KU quarterback since Todd Reesing in 2009 to throw for more than 200 yards in four straight games.

Kansas assistant coach Eric Kiesau huddles the offense during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas.

Kansas assistant coach Eric Kiesau huddles the offense during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

2 – KU officials announced prior to Saturday's game that wide receivers coach Eric Kiesau had been promoted to co-offensive coordinator and would take over play-calling duties from offensive line coach and co-offensive coordinator John Reagan. The KU offense has been anything but solid throughout the season and giving Kiesau — an accomplished and experienced coordinator himself — a chance to draw up the game plan and call the game can only help. Saturday's game was such a mismatch and over so early that it's hard to tell how successful Kiesau was and/or will be in the new role. But it's proof positive that Bowen continues to give it all he's got and is not afraid to pull the trigger on a decision he thinks might help the team, whether it works out or not.

3 – After watching Derrick Neal and Keon Stowers leave the game on carts after a couple of scary injuries, it appears both players are OK and on the path to recovery. Stowers posted a message saying as much on his Facebook page late Saturday night. Their availability for next Saturday is up in the air at this point, but the fact that both figure to be OK long-term is much more important than whether they'll be able to play against Iowa State.

Kansas defensive lineman Keon Stowers leaves the field on a cart after being injured during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas.

Kansas defensive lineman Keon Stowers leaves the field on a cart after being injured during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to sigh

1 – The play of KU's offensive line continues to hold this team back. Cummings rarely gets the time he needs to let plays develop, the running game is not working — how many times did Tony Pierson take a handoff on Saturday only to see three or four Bears waiting for him? — and, perhaps worse than either of those issues, KU's offensive linemen also are the most penalized players on the team. Four of KU's six penalties on Saturday were called on the O-Line. That's not a good combination, and unless it gets fixed, or at least becomes less destructive, KU won't have a chance the rest of the way.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings fumbles the ball after being hit by Baylor defensive end K.J. Smith during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. The Bears recovered the ball.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings fumbles the ball after being hit by Baylor defensive end K.J. Smith during the second quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. The Bears recovered the ball. by Nick Krug

2 – KU's streaks of futility grew by one. It's now 31 consecutive losses away from Lawrence. KU also extended its streak of losses against ranked opponents, as the Jayhawks' last victory over a ranked team came in Week 2 of the 2010 season, when they upset No. 15 Georgia Tech at home. The last time KU topped a ranked opponent away from Memorial Stadium came in 2008, when the Jayhawks knocked off No. 12 Missouri, 40-37, at Arrowhead Stadium, and KU's last true road victory over a ranked foe came via a 30-24 victory at No. 24 Kansas State in October of 2007.

3 – Three of the four games remaining on KU's schedule are against nationally-ranked teams. KU will host TCU on Nov. 15 and then finish the season at Oklahoma on Nov. 22 and at Kansas State on Nov. 29. Re-energized by Bowen or not, boosted by Eric Kiesau calling plays or not, that stretch is a nasty way to end a season and the Jayhawks' loss to Baylor on Saturday may have been a glimpse into their immediate future.

One for the road

KU's forgettable loss at Baylor....

• Gave the Jayhawks a 578-595-58 all-time record.

• Featured the most points the KU defense has given up this season and most since Texas A&M scored 61 points in a victory over Kansas in 2011.

• Delivered not only the first career rushing attempt by senior linebacker Ben Heeney but also the 17th double-digit tackle game of Heeney's career. The Hutchinson native led Kansas with 10 tackles.

• Included freshman Corey Avery twice breaking his career-best yardage total on a reception. Avery caught a pass for 36 yards early in the game and later added a 49-yard reception to top that.

Kansas running back Corey Avery is stopped short on a fourth down attempt by the Baylor defense during the fourth quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas.

Kansas running back Corey Avery is stopped short on a fourth down attempt by the Baylor defense during the fourth quarter at McLane Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

Next up

KU returns home for the first of back-to-back home games that will close out the 2014 home schedule, as Iowa State and former KU head coach Mark Mangino (now an assistant at ISU) come to Memorial Stadium for a 2:30 p.m. kickoff.

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What caught my eye at Wednesday’s KU football practice: Oct. 29

Wednesday afternoon marked the full return to a game-week practice for the Kansas University football team, which is slated to take on Baylor, at 3 p.m. in Waco, Texas, on Saturday.

The Jayhawks had a bye week last week and, therefore, went through a little different practice schedule than normal. That's not to say practices were any easier last week. In fact, junior safety Isaiah Johnson told me just the opposite. If anything, he said, practices were more intense, simply because the Jayhawks had time to lock in more on fundamentals yet still focused on physicality.

Plenty of Jayhawks got the rest they needed to get back into the flow for this week, though, and that was evident on Wednesday.

Here's a quick look at what caught my eye....

• Tony Pierson was out there working with the first-team offense and appears to be fine. I didn't see him favor anything or go half-speed to protect anything while he was participating in drills. Pierson was knocked out of the Texas Tech game after just two plays with what turned out to be a sprain of some sort near his neck. Good to see he's out there and ready to go for this week.

• Michael Cummings also looked sharp again. Cummings took a beating at Tech and even left the game for two plays. Earlier in the day, Cummings was asked what he got most out of the bye week and he answered with one simple word. “Rest.” From the sound of it, that was as much mental rest as physical rest, but Clint Bowen did give his guys last Friday and Saturday off and Cummings said he went fishing, watched some college football and just relaxed. There's no doubt that that kind of routine was good for everyone on the roster, especially considering the crazy times that have surrounded the program since the firing of former KU coach Charlie Weis.

• Wednesday's practice started with a little bit of flare, as Bowen broke out what appeared to be some kind of championship wrestling belt and then called the team together in a circle at midfield. Evidently, this happens quite often. Three players from the offense square off with three players from the defense in a quick wrestling-style showdown and whichever side — offense or defense — wins two of the three bouts emerges with the belt and bragging rights. I couldn't get a look at exactly who competed, but it looked like the offense won this round and the whole exercise created a lot of energy and excitement to kick off practice.

• One interesting note in terms of personnel.... Freshman wide receiver Darious Crawley is now working as a running back. It's hard to say if the move is permanent or what role the coaches have planned for the 5-11, 190-pound freshman from Houston, but he appears to have some natural ability. It's most likely just a depth thing for practice purposes, though. We'll see.

• Bowen said Tuesday that junior wide receiver Rodriguez Coleman would be in the mix for playing time after a quiet start to the season and he was very much that during Wednesday's practice. Known as a burner who can stretch the field, Coleman's emergence, should it happen, could really help this offense. He was very involved in Wednesday's practice and looked good running around out there.

• Speaking of somebody who looked good out there, wide receivers coach Eric Kiesau was also very active during the portion of practice I saw. Not only was he more vocal than I remember, with regard to the entire offense, not just his group, but he also flat-out got after it physically, running with guys during routes, throwing passes over the middle and encouraging guys to dig deeper, run it out and finish plays at an almost constant rate. The guy's got great energy and, perhaps more importantly, the players really seem to respond to his style.

• One quick note regarding former Jayhawks now playing in the NFL.... Chris Harris (Denver), Aqib Talib (Denver) and Anthony Collins (Tampa Bay) are all officially on this year's Pro Bowl ballot. Log on to NFL.com to cast your vote.

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Former KU cornerback Aqib Talib gives Jayhawks some love during Sunday Night Football intro

Denver cornerbacks Aqib Talib, left, and Chris Harris at Wednesday's introduction of Talib to the Denver media.

Denver cornerbacks Aqib Talib, left, and Chris Harris at Wednesday's introduction of Talib to the Denver media. by Matt Tait

By now, it's a well-known fact around KU Nation that the Denver Broncos have two former Jayhawks starting in their secondary.

When Denver added free agent Aqib Talib to its roster in the offseason, the signing reunited the former KU cornerback and star of the Jayhawks' victory over Virginia Tech in the 2008 Orange Bowl with his running mate from that game, Denver cornerback Chris Harris.

For many KU fans, having a couple of their favorite former Jayhawks on the Broncos' roster is a nightmare since so many of them are also fans of the Kansas City Chiefs. But Sunday night, during the Broncos home game with San Francisco on Sunday Night Football, Talib gave KU fans a reason to smile whether they dislike the Broncos or not.

For the first time in years (if not ever) Talib gave a shout-out to KU during his introduction that plays along the bottom on the screen on all Sunday night games.

In recent years, Talib often represented his hometown or his high school or said North Dallas after introducing himself. Not Sunday. This time, he simply said, "Aqib Talib, Kansas."

There was some speculation that Talib started leaving KU out of his intro because of his displeasure with the way KU coach Mark Mangino was treated during the end of his time with the Jayhawks. I've never heard that confirmed, but do know it's a popular opinion.

As for why it changed, I don't know the exact details but I know that Talib's snub of the Jayhawks during his intros always rubbed KU fans and several people within the football program the wrong way and I heard that someone at KU reached out to Talib and talked to him about giving KU some love. I even heard one account that Talib spoke to the team before this year's spring game and former KU coach Charlie Weis asked him to start saying KU during the intros. Who knows? But whatever it was, it obviously worked.

During Denver's only other primetime game on NBC this season, they mysteriously did not introduce the Broncos' defense, so this was the first time we were able to see Talib make the change.

As for Harris, he's always been proud to rep KU. He typically says "Chris Harris, Kansas University," but on Sunday he said, "Chris Harris, Kansas Jayhawks."

Regardless of what they say during the intros, it's still so wild to see two former Jayhawks starting for one of the best teams in pro football.

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The Day After: Tripped up at Texas Tech

Kansas running back Corey Avery is taken off his feet by several Texas Tech defenders during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas running back Corey Avery is taken off his feet by several Texas Tech defenders during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

There was not too much to like about KU's 34-21 loss at Texas Tech on Saturday, but also not too much to hate. It was just one of those sort of deliberate and drawn out games in which the Jayhawks' fell behind early, fought to get back in it and then just did not have enough left in the tank — be that juice or talent — to surge past the Red Raiders.

The players and interim head coach Clint Bowen both said they saw more small signs of progress, but they're not out there solely to progress. They want to win. And they're quickly running out of chances in 2014.

With just three road games remaining in 2014 — at Baylor, Oklahoma and Kansas State — the Jayhawks, all of a sudden, are staring at the very real possibility of taking that road losing streak, which now stands at 30, into the 2015 season. That's not to say they can't upset one of those perennial Big 12 powerhouses, but the odds that it will happen are slim. That's what made a loss like Saturday's so tough for these guys because they know they had the talent to play with Tech and let a couple of little things beat them.

Quick takeaway

The way I see it, Texas Tech is not a very good football team and they made plenty of mistakes that, against more talented teams, would have cost them. That's probably what hurt the most for the Jayhawks late Saturday night and into Sunday, when they, no doubt, thought back about the missed opportunity and wondered why they couldn't get it done in a winnable game. The biggest issue continues to be their slow starts and it's hard to say how that can be fixed on the fly. Like most things, it's probably as much of an attitude thing as anything, and if that's the case, KU should consider itself lucky because playing with good attitude and great passion is not at all a problem for these guys.

Kansas linebacker Ben Heeney drags down a Texas Tech receiver during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas linebacker Ben Heeney drags down a Texas Tech receiver during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to smile

1 – Ben frickin' Heeney, man. I've now covered more than two dozen college football games that the senior from Hutchinson factored into prominently and I now have an undisputed best game I've ever seen him play. Until now, there were so many 14- or 15-tackle outings that blended together that it made it tough for one of them to stand out above the others. But this one was a whole different level of Heeney. He looked as fast as I've ever seen him look, played with his signature attacking style from start to finish and just made play after play after play. Twenty-one tackles. Seventeen of them of the solo variety. And an interception that was arguably the biggest play of the game for the Jayhawks. I've said it before on a couple of occasions, but I don't think it can be said enough. We're in the midst of watching one of KU's all-time greats and the chance to watch Heeney be Heeney is worth the price of admission all by itself.

2 – The Jayhawks continued to show that, at least under Bowen, they're never out of it. Even after digging a 17-0 hole early in the game, nobody panicked, the Jayhawks stayed with the game plan and eventually began to make plays that got them back into it. A lot of the credit for this goes to quarterback Michael Cummings, who, other than a couple of forced deep balls, was pretty solid for the second week in a row. He finished with 235 yards, 2 passing TDs and a rushing TD, improved his completion percentage (from 54 to 63) and used his poise, confidence and leadership skills to keep the offense plugging away series after series.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings looks to throw as Texas Tech linebacker Pete Robertson is fended off by KU tight end Jimmay Mundine during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas quarterback Michael Cummings looks to throw as Texas Tech linebacker Pete Robertson is fended off by KU tight end Jimmay Mundine during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

3 – Kansas had just four penalties enforced against it during Saturday's loss in Lubbock. This represents marked improvement from the past two games, when KU finished with 11 against West Virginia and 8 more against Oklahoma State. With a team like this, when the margin for error is so small that the Jayhawks cannot get away with hardly any mistakes or mental lapses, eliminating those moments when they make life harder on themselves is absolutely critical in every aspect of the game. That means catching passes that are catchable, carrying out assignments and fundamentals all the way through the end of the play and, of course, avoiding those unforced errors that turn manageable situations into nasty ones. KU was not flawless in this department across the board against Texas Tech, but they did take care of business in the penalty department.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – KU's 128 net rushing yards was nearly 150 fewer yards per game than the Red Raiders had given up to opponents on average this year. The total is not as big of a problem — though they still left a lot of yards out there by failing to convert on third downs — as the yards-per-carry average. Led by Corey Avery's 69 yards on 15 carries, Kansas averaged just 3.2 yards per rush in Saturday's loss, which again shows the number of yards they left on the field, which in turn led to missed first downs and ultimately missed points. KU has the horses to have a strong running game, but too often the blocking at the point of attack is breaking down making life miserable for Avery, De'Andre Mann and Michael Cummings.

2 – After carrying the ball for nine yards on the first two plays of the game, senior Tony Pierson missed the rest of the day with an undisclosed injury. There's been some talk that Pierson might have suffered some kind of injury to one of his hands but no official word has come from KU. Regardless of what it is or how long it keeps him out, it's pretty disheartening to see this happening to Pierson for two reasons — 1. It really puts the KU offense in a tough spot because he's a guy who can do so much and put so much pressure on defenses. 2. It's just a drag for Tony. He's been one of KU's best players during the past four years and been nothing but a model teammate and student and lead-by-example kind of guy. Good things are supposed to happen to guys like that, not injuries that keep them off the field.

Kansas safety Isaiah Johnson (5) encourages teammate Dexter McDonald after McDonald bobbled a would-be interception against Texas Tech during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. The Red Raiders scored on the ensuing drive.

Kansas safety Isaiah Johnson (5) encourages teammate Dexter McDonald after McDonald bobbled a would-be interception against Texas Tech during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. The Red Raiders scored on the ensuing drive. by Nick Krug

3 – He recently missed a game because of injury, so that could still be a factor, but there's no question that senior cornerback Dexter McDonald is just not quite right. Unlike last season, when he made pretty much every play that was put in front of him, McDonald is having an up-and-down season so far. In his latest outing, he dropped an interception that he probably would've caught 99 times out of 100 and also was beat for a touchdown. To be fair, the ball was thrown perfectly, but McDonald still let his guy get behind him. These aren't catastrophic miscues and it's very possible that he'll bounce back, but the bar has been set so high for him because of his fantastic skills and incredible 2013 season that even the slightest off day makes it seem like something's wrong.

One for the road

KU's loss at Texas Tech...

• Dropped the Jayhawks to 578-594-58 all-time.

• Pushed Texas Tech's edge in the all-time series with Kansas to 15-1.

• Included KU's first points of the second quarter all season, a 16-yard touchdown pass from Cummings to Justin McCay with 31 seconds to play in the first half.

• Featured another failed fourth-down attempt, which made Kansas just 2-for-11 this season when electing to go for it on fourth down.

Next up

The Jayhawks (2-5 overall, 0-4 Big 12) will take their second and final bye of the 2014 season, which many players said comes at a perfect time. Not only will it give them some time to rest up and get healthy, but it also will give them a little more time to further absorb Bowen's coaching style and set the tone for the way they want to finish the season. After the bye, KU will travel to Waco, Texas, for a match-up with Baylor on Nov. 1.

The Kansas Jayhawks get fired up in the tunnel prior to kickoff against Texas Tech on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

The Kansas Jayhawks get fired up in the tunnel prior to kickoff against Texas Tech on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

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What caught my eye at Wednesday’s KU football practice: Oct. 15th

The Jayhawks practiced in Memorial Stadium on Wednesday on a gorgeous fall day.

The Jayhawks practiced in Memorial Stadium on Wednesday on a gorgeous fall day. by Matt Tait

I don't care how many times I go out there the rest of the season, I think I will continually be impressed by how much attention the KU coaching staff gives to fundamentals and proper technique during their normal practice routine.

That was the biggest thing I took away from Wednesday's hour or so that we were out there as the Jayhawks continued preparation for this weekend's game at Texas Tech, and, it showed up everywhere on the field.

Offensive line coach John Reagan worked closely with the tackles on one-foot bursts that helped position them deeper to take on pass-rushers and, while doing so, showed no patience for wasted time.

While working with left tackle Pat Lewandowski at the 5-yard line, Reagan barked to right tackle Larry Mazyck behind him around the 8 to be set up and ready for his reps next. Before Reagan even turned around, Mazyck was in the proper stance and ready to work. This rapid-fire, back-and-forth approach continued throughout the drill.

Down the field 60 yards, the same sort of instruction was being given by defensive backs coach Dave Campo, who routinely stopped one drill to demonstrate with his body what he was yelling with his voice.

It's funny because during Tuesday's media session, Campo slyly pointed out that, even though being a head coach at the college level is a young man's game, he still believed he had plenty of energy left in the tank. Wednesday, I saw it on full display. What a resource.

At one point, Campo was caught in the middle of the drill and nearly taken out by safety Isaiah Johnson, who, wisely, wrapped up his coach and did all he could to prevent himself from taking him to the ground. Rather than sighing or taking a moment for relief, Campo rolled his eyes, mumbled something or other under his breath and hustled back out to his spot in the drill. Great stuff.

It's not as important for the veterans who have been through this whole thing before, but seeing the coaches work like this really helps send a message to the young guys and, in my opinion, is exactly what's necessary to change the culture and future of the program.

Here's a quick look at some other things that stood out from Wednesday's practice:

• Former KU kicker Scott Webb was on hand to watch the action. Webb, as you may recall, was the KU kicker on the Orange Bowl team in 2008.

KU senior Tony Pierson runs a drill during Wednesday's practice.

KU senior Tony Pierson runs a drill during Wednesday's practice. by Matt Tait

• Senior Tony Pierson spent the early portion of practice working exclusively with KU's running backs. The good thing about Pierson right now — other than all that speed — is that he's reached a point where he's advanced enough as a receiver and yet still comfortable enough as a running back to be used in either spot (or even both) week in and week out.

• Want one for the attention to detail file? During a drill with the running backs, who ran through the gauntlet to simulate tacklers reaching and grabbing to bring them down, running backs coach Reggie Mitchell recognized that Aaron Plump did not have a ball. Rather than letting it slide and moving on to the next drill, Mitchell made Plump go get a ball and take his turn again.

• I watched the O-Line for quite a while on Wednesday and the main thing I took away was this — these dudes are working hard. I can't say I heard as much grunting and groaning during all of the drills I saw in preseason camp as I did during one or two drills on Wednesday. Say what you want about the line, but don't say it doesn't matter to these guys and that they're not working to get better.

• At least for the time I was out there, senior cornerback Dexter McDonald was a full participant. KU coach Clint Bowen said earlier this week that he expected McDonald to play Saturday and I didn't see anything that would indicate otherwise.

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Pro-Bowen Facebook page picking up steam

A screen shot of the pro-Clint Bowen Facebook page put together by KU fans.

A screen shot of the pro-Clint Bowen Facebook page put together by KU fans. by Matt Tait

The first signs showed up at the weekly Hawk Talk radio show at Salty Iguana a little less than 36 hours after he officially had accepted the title of interim football coach at Kansas University.

But things are starting to get a little more serious now.

That night, back on Sept. 29, friends, family and football supporters packed the restaurant in West Lawrence to standing-room-only capacity to show their support for Clint Bowen, who stepped in to replace the fired Charlie Weis as the leader of the Jayhawks.

Since then, the love for Bowen has only grown. First was the decoration of the football complex that greeted the Jayhawks upon arriving home after their 33-14 loss at West Virginia, Bowen's first game as a head coach. Then came the show of support by former KU players and Bowen teammates prior to last Saturday's 27-20 home loss to Oklahoma State. Between 150-200 former Jayhawks showed up to line the field as the Jayhawks ran out of the locker room, and many said they came specifically because they believe in Bowen, a former Jayhawk player himself, who has spent 16 of 19 coaching seasons in crimson and blue.

The latest in the Bowen love fest showed up sometime Sunday, when a Facebook page touting Bowen as the choice for KU's next head coach was created. By the time I posted this blog it already had received 608 “likes.”

The goal of the Facebook group is spelled out ever-so-simply in the “About” section of the social media site: “This is a page dedicated to making Clint Bowen the next HC for KU football; through the support of KU students, alumni, and fans. WE WANT BOWEN,” it reads. It includes a couple of photos, a couple of posts — the most notable reads “Let Zenger hear us loud and clear - WE WANT BOWEN!!! — and a bunch of familiar names from past KU football rosters.

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen talks to senior Michael Reynolds just before the Jayhawks take the field Saturday afternoon. Kansas dropped the game 27-20 to Oklahoma State.

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen talks to senior Michael Reynolds just before the Jayhawks take the field Saturday afternoon. Kansas dropped the game 27-20 to Oklahoma State. by Ryan Waggoner

I first saw the page early Monday morning and thought to myself, 'Huh, look at that, more love for Bowen.' At the time it had around 140 likes and I didn't really think much more about it.

Later in the day, someone sent me a link to the page and when I checked in again, the number of likes had doubled. The same thing happened Monday night, just before I sat down to write this, and that's when I began to pay attention.

Don't get me wrong, I get it; 500, 1,000, even 5,000 likes on a Facebook does not magically make Bowen become the automatic choice to be selected as the next head coach of the Jayhawks. No matter how high the number grows, it likely will never register high enough for KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger to truly factor it into his decision. But I can guarantee you that Zenger, provided he finds out about it, will take note of the page and it will mean something.

What that is is anyone's guess. But, if nothing else, it's a clear sign that Bowen is well liked, and that gives him a chance.

Kansas coach Clint Bowen barks orders to his defense during Kansas' game against Oklahoma State Saturday at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas coach Clint Bowen barks orders to his defense during Kansas' game against Oklahoma State Saturday at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

Just for fun, let's say the page was created around 10 p.m. Sunday night. I wrote this blog around 10 p.m. Monday night. So in that 24-hour period, 608 people found it worthwhile to log on to the page and click the like button in support of Bowen.

If the page continues to grow at that pace —which may very well be tied to the question of whether Bowen's Jayhawks continue to play the way they have the past two weeks — then by the time he runs onto the field at Kansas State for the Jayhawks' season finale on Nov. 29, the “We Want Bowen” Facebook page could have more than 29,000 likes, which is probably a little more than the number of people who actually showed up at 50,000-seat Memorial Stadium for last weekend's game. Even that number is not as high as it needs to be to consider the potential hire a home run, but it sure wouldn't hurt.

Reaching that number is probably the longest of long shots. In fact, there's probably very little chance that the number of likes on the page even reaches five digits. But whether they find their way to the Facebook page or not, people everywhere are making it known that Bowen is the guy they want to lead the Jayhawks into the future. I've received emails, phone calls and Tweets that say just that and I'm just one person.

That does not include the feelings of everyone out there, of course. Nor does it mean that many of those same people would be upset if Zenger chose to go a different direction. There are plenty of guys who would be great choices for the job and several who probably would have a terrific shot at becoming successful. But not many of them, if any, would move into the head coach's office at the Anderson Family Football Complex with the kind of backing that Bowen currently has.

He has to sustain that, of course. And the only way for that to happen is for him to continue to make the Jayhawks competitive in what ESPN.com recently voted the second best conference in football in its latest College Football Power Rankings. So, there's that. But if it happens, and especially if Bowen can find a way to lead Kansas to a win or two, then there will be no need to take a poll to find out how people would feel about Bowen being hired. They've already spoken.

Here's a look at the "BOWEN should be HC" Facebook page

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The Day After: A close call vs. the Cowboys

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen talks to senior Michael Reynolds just before the Jayhawks take the field Saturday afternoon. Kansas dropped the game 27-20 to Oklahoma State.

Kansas interim head coach Clint Bowen talks to senior Michael Reynolds just before the Jayhawks take the field Saturday afternoon. Kansas dropped the game 27-20 to Oklahoma State. by Ryan Waggoner

Two weeks after being blanked by a struggling Texas team at home, the Kansas University football team took the 16th-ranked squad in the nation to the wire in a 27-20 loss at Memorial Stadium.

It's been quite a transformation since former KU coach Charlie Weis was let go and interim head coach Clint Bowen was plugged in to replace him. The roster remains the same, the issues that existed under Weis are still present (though improving) under Bowen, but the Jayhawks appear to be playing harder and fighting with everything they've got.

Even while falling behind 20-7 at halftime, one did not get the sense that Kansas was out of it or overmatched. Led by a defense that's getting better each week and an offense that enjoyed its best four-quarter stretch of the season, the Jayhawks got the game tied at 20 with 6:55 to play and then watched a special teams miscue cost them.

Consistent effort and progress is what Bowen has preached since taking over and, even though things weren't perfect against the Cowboys, it's hard to argue that both were not achieved during KU's latest outing.

Kansas senior buck Michael Reynolds (55) and junior lineman T.J. Semke team up to sack Oklahoma State quarterback Daxx Garman (12) during their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas senior buck Michael Reynolds (55) and junior lineman T.J. Semke team up to sack Oklahoma State quarterback Daxx Garman (12) during their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

Quick takeaway

This week's near-upset of Oklahoma State may have been all about the Kansas offense finding its groove, but it would be a crime to overlook what this KU defense is doing right now. Saturday's game marked the second week in a row in which the Kansas defense did not surrender a single point in the second half. And it's not as if they were playing chumps during the past two weeks. Both West Virginia and Oklahoma State came in averaging well over 400 yards per game and the KU defense found enough rhythm, especially in the final two quarters, to really frustrate those dynamic offenses and give the Jayhawks a chance to hang around. It would have been real easy weeks ago for this defense to throw up its hands in frustration for the offense's struggles, but instead of doing that, Ben Heeney and company kept working, put more on their shoulders and finally saw the offense help them out a little on Saturday.

Three reasons to smile

1 – Michael Cummings clearly looks like the answer at quarterback. Not only does the junior who made the sixth start of his career look more comfortable, confident and competent out there, but he also is not afraid to make plays. He got the ball to Nick Harwell seven times. He exploited mismatches for Jimmay Mundine five times and he helped get Tony Pierson the 10-15 touches per game he needs for the offense to get going. The best part about all of that? He was hardly impressed. Cummings said he loved being back out there again but added that, based off of the team's performance, it's clear that they still have a ton of work to do. It didn't sound like coach speak when he said it either. Bowen didn't anoint Cummings the starter for the rest of the season publicly, but there's no doubt that the 5-10 junior is KU's answer at the position.

Kansas players Corey Avery (6), Mike Smithburg (65) and Michael Cummings (14) celebrate Avery's fourth quarter touchdown during their game against Oklahoma State Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas players Corey Avery (6), Mike Smithburg (65) and Michael Cummings (14) celebrate Avery's fourth quarter touchdown during their game against Oklahoma State Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

2 – The pride in the room was palpable but at no point did you get the impression that the Jayhawks thought what they did on Saturday was anywhere near good enough. That's a reflection of their head coach, who clearly appreciated how hard his team played and fought and how close they came to pulling the upset, but continues to emphasize that getting close is not what's important. Bowen coaches that way, his players reflect that in the way they play and, for the first time in a while, these guys seem to really believe in themselves. Instead of just hearing them say it, you can actually sense it. Nowhere is that better summed up than in a few words Bowen uttered toward the end of Saturday's postgame press conference: "I'm not so sure our team has to take a back seat to anybody. We show up any given day and compete."

Kansas senior cornerback JaCorey Shepherd attempts to defend a pass against Oklahoma State wide receiver James Washington during the first half.

Kansas senior cornerback JaCorey Shepherd attempts to defend a pass against Oklahoma State wide receiver James Washington during the first half. by Ryan Waggoner

3 – KU's secondary proved just how good it is by frustrating Daxx Garman (17-of-31 for 161 yards, 1 TD, 1 interception, 1 lost fumble) and the Oklahoma State passing offense WITHOUT the services of starting cornerback Dexter McDonald, who missed all but one play of Saturday's game because of injury. Matthew Boateng filled in and fought his tail off, JaCorey Shepherd kept his sensational season rolling, nickelback Tevin Shaw played arguably the best game of his career and safeties Cassius Sendish, Isaiah Johnson and Fish Smithson were tough against the pass and strong in support of the run.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – Those darn kickoff returns. That's two weeks in a row that the Jayhawks have given up a kickoff return for a touchdown, and this one cost them the game. Bowen said practicing the kickoff coverage unit was one of the toughest things to do because you can't afford to send guys flying down field at full speed repeatedly in practice without risking injury, but KU's going to have to find something that works because this group is not getting it done. Bowen said it was the second week in a row with the new personnel on that unit, so maybe it's just a matter of reps and time. Compounding matters is the fact that KU, though decent, continues to get nothing significant from its kick return unit. Average starting field position for OSU on Saturday was its own 35, which included four drives starting in KU territory. Average starting field position for KU? The KU 28, with just one drive starting in OSU territory. Until that kickoff return by Tyreek Hill, the Jayhawks had kept the Big 12's No. 2 all-purpose yards per game guy bottled up to the tune of 71 yards, less than half of his average.

Kansas' Justin McCay (19) and Jake Love (57) team up to put a hit on Oklahoma State punt returner Tyreek Hill during their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas' Justin McCay (19) and Jake Love (57) team up to put a hit on Oklahoma State punt returner Tyreek Hill during their game Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. by John Young

2 – Trevor Pardula's shank punt near the end of the first half proved to be a killer. It's hard to pile on Pardula too much here because the guy so often has been one of the few bright spots in some bad beatings during the past couple of seasons. But when KU really needed a good one to finish off a strong first half, Pardula yanked a 20-yard kick out of bounds. That set the Cowboys up with a short field and, five plays, 30 yards and 59 seconds later, OSU picked up a touchdown that pushed the halftime lead to 20-7. The way the Kansas defense was playing, if Pardula had just boomed his average kick of 44 yards, the Cowboys may have come away empty and led by just six heading into the locker room.

3 – KU knocked down its penalty total from 11 last week at West Virginia to 8 this week against OSU, but that's still a tad too high. The reason? Because so many of KU's penalties were unforced. The Jayhawks had four false start penalties, a couple of face masks and a questionable pass interference call. When you're playing hard, these things are going to happen — particularly on defense. But Bowen and the offensive coaches have to find a way to address the false start penalties by the offensive line. This offense is not good enough to overcome flipping second- or third-and-short situations into second- or third-and-long.

One for the road

The Jayhawks' 27-20 loss to 16th-ranked Oklahoma State on Saturday...

• Dropped Kansas to 578-593-58 all-time.

• Featured the Kansas defense forcing Oklahoma State to a three-and-out on its first drive of the game, marking the third time in six games that the Jayhawks haven’t allowed a first down on their opponents’ first drive.

• Included KU's first lead in Big 12 play since a 31-19 victory over West Virginia on Nov. 16, 2013 (7-3 in the first quarter).

• Included an offensive series that featured the most plays in a single drive by Kansas this season, a 14-play 72-yard drive that spanned 4:56 and ended with a KU field goal that tied the game late in the fourth quarter.

• Featured a forced fumble by Michael Reynolds that gave the Kansas defense its sixth forced fumble in as many games.

Next up

The Jayhawks (2-4 overall, 0-3 Big 12) will hit the road for a 2:30 p.m. Saturday match-up at Texas Tech. The Red Raiders are coming off of a 37-34 loss to West Virginia and own the same records as the Jayhawks. “We haven't given up, despite what a lot of people think," senior linebacker Ben Heeney said. "We're 2-4, we have six games left and we're focused on Texas Tech right now. Why can't we win next week?” All of a sudden, that seems like a pretty fair question.

Kansas senior safety Cassius Sendish intercepts a pass early in the 2nd half of the Jayhawks 27-20 loss to Oklahoma State Saturday afternoon. The play was one of two turnovers forced by Kansas on the day.

Kansas senior safety Cassius Sendish intercepts a pass early in the 2nd half of the Jayhawks 27-20 loss to Oklahoma State Saturday afternoon. The play was one of two turnovers forced by Kansas on the day. by Ryan Waggoner

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Coaching Search 2014: Gary Barnett not the answer, but he can help Kansas football

Former Colorado and Northwestern football coach Gary Barnett is probably not going to be the next head coach at Kansas University.

Probably, as in former Jayhawk running back Jake Sharp might have a better shot.

But that doesn't mean that Barnett can't help Kansas.

Thursday morning, on both WHB 810 sports radio in Kansas City and in an article written by Dennis Dodd of CBS Sports, Barnett expressed his interest in the KU job. He did this when the job was open in the past and his desire to give it a try in Lawrence seems sincere. But that doesn't mean he's the guy.

There are a bunch of reasons for that, ranging from his age (68), his resignation from Colorado following a recruiting scandal and the fact that he's been out of coaching since 2005, but the bottom line is the Jayhawks can probably do better. Maybe not better as in Jim Harbaugh, but better as in younger, more ties to Texas, more ties to Kansas, more energy for the massive rebuilding project that is Kansas football.

Barnett was a darn good coach in his day. His rebuild at Northwestern was one of the best of the time and his Colorado teams were always competitive in the Big 12 and the Buffs haven't had a winning season since he left.

But KU does not have to hire Barnett to get something from him. Just him showing interest in the opening is good news for Kansas. It proves people want the job. It proves that good coaches with a good track record and a recognizable name want the job. It provides the appearance that the KU job is worth taking. And let's face it, at the moment it's not as if very many people out there are thinking that way.

The Jayhawks have been in the cellar of the Big 12 for several years in a row, unable to beat even Iowa State. The current roster is full of talented seniors who won't be around for the next head coach and the offensive line and quarterback positions — two of the game's most important — are a mess.

If a guy like Barnett, with his 92 career victories and 34-22 career mark as a head coach in the Big 12, is interested, that could help raise some eyebrows from others around the country and, at the very least, give Kansas AD Sheahon Zenger more and better options.

I'm not naive. I realize that a big reason Barnett might want the job is for the paycheck. Who wouldn't be excited about the idea of making $5-7 million over the next five years no matter what the challenges are? Sure sounds better than the dough he's bringing home as a color guy for radio broadcasts of college games. Beyond that, it's rarely a good look, for the individual, to be campaigning for job openings on local talk radio shows.

But even without spending a day in the head coach's office, Barnett just did KU a favor. And it didn't cost Zenger a dime. The more names like this that surface — and the more time the Kansas opening spends in the headlines — the more likely it becomes that the guy who is the right fit but is on the fence about taking the job decides it's worth it and takes the plunge.

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What caught my eye at Wednesday’s practice: Oct. 8th

KU receiver Nick Harwell and defensive back Greg Allen battle for a ball during Wednesday's one-on-ones.

KU receiver Nick Harwell and defensive back Greg Allen battle for a ball during Wednesday's one-on-ones. by Matt Tait

If there's one thing I've learned in the two Kansas University football practices we've been able to watch since Clint Bowen took over as the team's interim head coach, it's that paying attention to detail won't be lacking for the Jayhawks.

Bowen and his squad again spent the first hour or so of practice working on fundamentals and drills that are both designed to prep the players for their next opponent and develop them for the future.

Wednesday's session began with Bowen — the current head coach — walking his kickoff coverage team through a very slow and methodical drill designed to teach kick coverage. It seemed appropriate given (a) the fact that KU gave up a kickoff return for a touchdown last week and (b) Bowen has emphasized a ton in the past two weeks that KU has to get better in special teams if it expects to have a chance to compete in the Big 12.

There was nothing flashy about the drill, just 11 guys running quarter-speed down the field and focusing on staying in their lanes. Later, the team went to full kickoff coverage and tried to recreate the slow-mo specifics.

KU coach Clint Bowen sticks his head into a drill featuring KU's linebackers during Wednesday's practice.

KU coach Clint Bowen sticks his head into a drill featuring KU's linebackers during Wednesday's practice. by Matt Tait

• Shortly after the kickoff coverage drill was complete, the Jayhawks emphasized field goals and Matthew Wyman had a fantastic day. Wyman drilled all of his kicks, including one from near 50 yards. As Wyman set up, senior receiver Nick Harwell was making sure those on the sideline realized the importance of every little detail. “Let's make sure we make this (stuff) matter,” Harwell yelled repeatedly. As soon as Wyman drilled the kick, Harwell was the first to lead the charge in celebrating the kick before the Jayhawks moved on to individual drills.

• One of my favorite parts of these practices has become the one-on-ones between the wide receivers and defensive backs. Not only does it show guys competing their tails off, but, on Wednesday, it also gave me a good, rapid-fire look at all three KU quarterbacks competing for the starting job. It was too hard to tell exactly who looked best as a thrower — each guy (Michael Cummings, Montell Cozart and T.J. Millweard) had good moments and bad — but it was easy to see who was the most impressive receiver. His name was Nigel King and he caught everything. King got open, used his big frame to shield off DBs and snatched the ball out of the air with his strong hands the way a father might catch a return throw of a Nerf football from his son.

KU quarterbacks coach Ron Powlus works with the Kansas quarterbacks during Wednesday's practice.

KU quarterbacks coach Ron Powlus works with the Kansas quarterbacks during Wednesday's practice. by Matt Tait

• One other quick note about kickoffs: Don't be surprised if you see KU senior Tony Pierson back there returning kicks this week. The coaching staff has really emphasized trying to find ways for Pierson to get more touches and that could be an easy one. To no one's surprise, Pierson also got some reps at WR and RB on Wednesday.

• It might not mean much come Saturday, but quarterback Michael Cummings and center Joe Gibson worked with the first unit at the start of practice. If that holds to Saturday, it would be a change in the starting lineup at both spots, as Cozart and Keyon Haughton had started the first four games in those positions. Again, it's too early to say and too hard to know if that was an indicator or just a rotation-type coincidence.

• KU alum Dana Anderson, a huge Jayhawk supporter whose name is on the outside of the Anderson Family Football Complex, attended Wednesday's practice and spoke to the team before the action started.

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Coaching Search 2014: Is Jim Harbaugh a legit candidate for Kansas?

Here's the quick coaching search nugget of the day as it pertains to the KU football program.

Although the search still has yet to start — (a) because the program would like to see what it's got in interim coach Clint Bowen and (b) because it's barely October and most, if not all, of the viable candidates for the job are busy working their butts off at other schools — there seems to be at least a tidbit or two of information floating around every couple of days.

Lately, a lot of that information has focused on San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh.

Harbaugh, as you know, was rumored to be thiiiisss close to taking the job when Turner Gill got it, but things, according to popular opinion, blew up at the last second and the Jayhawks were left with Gill.

One of the big draws for Harbaugh then was that his wife grew up in the Kansas City area and is a KU fan. Well, if you believe what's being thrown out there right now, you're likely thinking that that's a big draw again this time around.

Various reports have said that Harbaugh and the 49ers are not exactly seeing eye to eye at the moment, and many of them indicate that the Niners head coach is unlikely to return to the Bay Area in 2015.

Does that mean he's coming to Kansas? Hardly.

Could it happen? You bet. But is all of this current buzz an indicator that it's going to or even that he would be the leading candidate? Nope.

I'm sure if Harbaugh were interested in the job — and that part, to me, is not that big of a stretch — he could make his interest known and perhaps even contact KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger himself to check the temperature on the job. Doing so would go a long way toward helping his chances.

But even if Harbaugh ultimately decides to go after the job, he's not exactly a slam dunk, no-brainer hire for Kansas.

Here are a few reasons Harbaugh could have trouble landing the job:

• The price tag could be too high. For one, it doesn't sound to me like KU's interested in paying the $3-$5 million per year range that Harbaugh could command, so right there he could be pricing himself out of the job. Even if KU was willing to pay big bucks, there's no way Harbaugh's salary would exceed what Kansas pays Bill Self, who, in 2013, signed a 10-year, $50 million extension.

• Speaking of Self, could Harbaugh work at a school where he and the football program were not the kings of the castle?

• Harbaugh had a ton of success at Stanford and clearly is more than capable of doing a solid job at the collegiate level, but he'd be coming to Kansas directly from the NFL and I'm guessing that both Zenger and the KU fan base might be a little gun-shy about that, given the NFL ties of their last head coach.

• There's no question that Harbaugh would draw a ton of attention from Michigan, his alma mater, if the Wolverines' job came open and that possibility could keep KU from pursuing Harbaugh too heavily. For one, if the situation at Michigan suddenly turned favorable — better pay, a new AD, etc. — then KU, in its current state, probably could not compete. For two, even if KU could land Harbaugh now, you'd have to wonder if the lure of his alma mater or even the NFL again would be a problem down the road.

None of this means Harbaugh is a bad option for Kansas or that the Jayhawks should stay away. He's a proven coach with an incredible track record who, if truly committed, probably could get Kansas back on the right track in a hurry.

But there are at least a few concerns that might keep KU from getting too invested in Harbaugh too soon.

I'd say he remains a solid candidate but probably isn't in the top couple of names on Zenger's list as things stand today. We all know how quickly things can change, though, so buckle up and get ready for this thing to heat up when November hits.

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Interesting notes about Clint Bowen’s role as KU football’s interim head coach

Now that interim head coach Clint Bowen is officially into his stint as the Jayhawks' head coach, it's time to examine a few of the more minor details of his takeover that got lost in the celebratory manner in which he transitioned into the job.

One of the important things to remember about Bowen's time as interim head coach is that just because he has the “interim” tag in front of the title does not mean he is not loaded with responsibility. Not only does he have to run the team, come up with the defensive game plan and handle all of the media obligations of the head coach, but he also has within his grasp complete control of his personnel. He showed he understands that last week when he benched starting quarterback Montell Cozart and replaced him with Michael Cummings and also did the same with starting center Keyon Haughton in favor of red-shirt freshman Joe Gibson.

Don't be surprised if you see more moves in the next few days and in the coming weeks — as Bowen has said clearly, the players have to earn the right to play — and don't be surprised if the same concept extends to the roles, responsibilities and input of the coaching staff, as well. Now five games into the season, it's abundantly clear that Bowen and the Jayhawks have to consider every option and angle in their efforts to get the offense going. And that might mean listening to any idea that anyone on the staff has, from the full-time offensive and defensive assistants to the GAs and lower-profile staff members.

OK, now on to some more concrete details...

First off, Bowen's contract did not change. He's still being paid as the school's defensive coordinator for his nine weeks as interim head coach.

On a similar note, Bowen will not be making any money for taking over Weis' role as the featured guest on the weekly Hawk Talk radio show, which airs every Monday night from 6-7 p.m.

As far as where Bowen does most of his dirty work, that did not change either. Bowen did not move into the corner office reserved for the head coach when Weis moved out but he has access to both his old office and the head coach's office so he can have easier access to the coaches on both sides of the ball.

Speaking of Bowen's office, in one of his first meetings with the players following Weis' departure, Bowen informed the team that his door would always be open and even warned them that if he saw any of them making their way into the hallway of coaches offices in the back of the football complex, they would have a meeting. It did not matter if it was one or two guys or a group of 10, Bowen said he would always make himself available to the team whenever they needed to see him. And, on the very first day after he was assigned his new role, nearly 85 members of the team made their way into his office at one point or another to check in with their new leader.

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The Day After: A wobbly night at West Virginia

A deep pass to Kansas receiver Justin McCay goes long as he is trailed by West Virginia cornerback Ishmael Banks during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia.

A deep pass to Kansas receiver Justin McCay goes long as he is trailed by West Virginia cornerback Ishmael Banks during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia. by Nick Krug

The last time KU played at West Virginia, the Jayhawks were drubbed 59-10 and limped off the field with no life and no fire. Not Saturday night.

Sure that team had Geno Smith and Tavo Austin and several other big-time WVU players, but it's not like this team isn't any good. They hung with Alabama and Oklahoma and, at least for a half, the Jayhawks hung with them.

The first half was a total nightmare, as sophomore starter Montell Cozart continued to struggle and KU's offense had absolutely no rhythm. They're not going to have a chance if that continues, Clint Bowen or no Clint Bowen. In the second half, Bowen made the switch to Michael Cummings and things improved a little on offense, but the defense's effort in the second half was flat-out terrific. The only WVU points came on a kickoff return and it wasn't like the Mountaineers had trotted out their second- and third-string guys. Quarterbakc Clint Trickett played most of the way and KU stymied him and the WVU passing attack in the second half.

It didn't do much in the way of helping put the Jayhawks in position to win, but it was one of a handful of small steps that they may be able build upon and helped make the final score a more respectable 33-14 margin.

Kansas backup quarterback Michael Cummings throws to a target against West Virginia during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia.

Kansas backup quarterback Michael Cummings throws to a target against West Virginia during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia. by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway:

While critical analysis will show that this game taught us several things about this team, the only one that's important is what it revealed about the quarterback. I like Montell Cozart a lot. He's an impressive young man, a good athlete and he carries himself well and with a positive vibe. But he's not yet ready to play quarterback in the Big 12 and Michael Cummings is. Neither player is a set-the-world-on-fire type of QB, but Cummings looks to be in way better control out there, sees the field better, knows where to go with the ball and has done it enough to refuse to get rattled. His skill set is still lacking, but I think if you build it around what he can do, the KU offense could definitely take a step forward with Cummings under center.

Three reasons to smile:

1 – I don't care who you are or what you like about football, you have to agree that watching JaCorey Shepherd play and compete is an absolute joy. Shepherd played one of his best games to date against the Mountaineers, breaking up two passes in the end zone and three total. He was right with his receiver all afternoon and played the kind of tough, physical football that teammates would like to emulate and follow. The game means something to Shepherd. Representing KU means something to Shepherd. He's far from the only one on the team about which that can be said, but, with seven guaranteed games remaining in his career, it's clear that Shepherd is taking seriously his opportunity to help set the foundation for the new future of Kansas football.

Kansas receiver Nick Harwell looks to escape West Virginia safety KJ Dillon during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia.

Kansas receiver Nick Harwell looks to escape West Virginia safety KJ Dillon during the first quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia. by Nick Krug

2 – Nick Harwell has had enough. Not only did the senior receiver put together a heck of an individual effort to take a meaningless punt to the house late in the game — Harwell credited his blocking for making it possible — but he also showed exactly the kind of fire and passion the Jayhawks need from one of their leaders and best players. Late in the game, after a nice completion from Michael Cummings to Ben Johnson for a big gain, KU's Justin McCay was flagged with a personal foul penalty that completely wiped out the play and forced the Jayhawks into a punt. Without showing anyone up or throwing a fit, Harwell made it clear with his body language that such breakdowns were not acceptable. Asked about it after the game, Harwell said: “We never want to hurt ourselves, but we especially don't want to hurt ourselves after we just made a big play. It was kind of a bummer for that drive.”

3 — The “AM” stickers worn on the backs of the KU helmets in honor of Andre Maloney would make anyone smile. Maloney, who passed away one year ago to the day after collapsing on the field during a high school game his senior season at Shawnee Mission West, touched a lot of people in his short time as a Jayhawk and, as interim coach Clint Bowen last night and former KU coach Charlie Weis throughout the past year both pointed out, the talented and extremely likable Maloney will remain a part of the KU football family forever.

On the back of the Jayhawks' helmets are the initials AM to represent Andre Maloney, a Kansas recruit from Shawnee Mission West High School who died after suffering a stroke on the field on Oct. 4, 2013.

On the back of the Jayhawks' helmets are the initials AM to represent Andre Maloney, a Kansas recruit from Shawnee Mission West High School who died after suffering a stroke on the field on Oct. 4, 2013. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to sigh:

1 – It continues to be frightening to see how easily Tony Pierson can be taken out of games. The senior receiver is one of the Jayhawks' most dangerous weapons and, at the moment, they just can't get him unleashed. They try to throw his way but he's usually tightly covered. When they hand him the ball, he often runs into a wall of defenders and has to dance around just to get back to the line of scrimmage. Short of upgrading the offensive line and the quarterback, it's hard to find a solution that ends with getting Tony more touches. But even if they have to force-feed him the rock, he's got to get more involved. That shovel pass they threw to tight end Jimmay Mundine would have been one way. And there have to be countless others.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart takes a helmet-to-helmet hit from West Virginia safety Karl Joseph while releasing a pass during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia. Also pictured are KU offensive lineman Ngalu Fusimalohi and WVU defensive lineman Eric Kinsey.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart takes a helmet-to-helmet hit from West Virginia safety Karl Joseph while releasing a pass during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia. Also pictured are KU offensive lineman Ngalu Fusimalohi and WVU defensive lineman Eric Kinsey. by Nick Krug

2 – The offense, in general, is really becoming a headache. It lacks flow, rhythm, creativity and imagination and just is not putting KU in positive positions. The offensive line is definitely the biggest culprit and maybe getting right tackle Damon Martin back will help with that. But too often, even when KU does get the ball to its playmakers, the blocking is either not there or doesn't hold up to create something positive in an attacking manner. What's more, senior punter Trevor Pardula set a stadium record with 14 punts and set a KU record for net punting yardage with 621. That's never what you want to hear no matter how talented your punter is.

3 – Junior running back De'Andre Mann left the game after just one carry with an apparent injury and did not return. Freshman tailback Corey Avery has gotten off to fantastic start to his career and is a hard-nosed runner, but he can't do it alone and the Jayhawks need Mann back and healthy. Look no farther for proof of that than the on carry Mann had when he was in the game against WVU. His bull-ahead, hard-charging style netted eight yards and his physical presence helps the running game tremendously.

One thought for the road:

KU's 33-14 loss at West Virginia dropped the Jayhawks to 2-3 on the season and 0-2 in Big 12 play. It also...

• dropped KU to 578-592-58 all-time.

• Featured the KU defense, for the third time in four games, not allowing a touchdown on the opponents’ first three possessions. West Virginia had only been held out of the end zone on its opening three drives once over four games this season.

• Was a classic bend-don't-break performance by the KU defense, which looked its best in the second half but still did not record its first three-and-out until 6:56 remained in the third quarter.

Next up:

The Jayhawks return home to face an Oklahoma State (4-1 overall, 2-0 Big 12) squad that saw a first-half scare against Iowa State at home this weekend but then put the Cyclones away in the second half.

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