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Entries from blogs tagged with “Tale of the Tait”

The Day After: Getting trounced by Temple

Kansas coach Bill Self and members of the team watch in the closing minutes of a 77-52 loss to the Temple Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Kansas coach Bill Self and members of the team watch in the closing minutes of a 77-52 loss to the Temple Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

You all saw it, so there's no real reason to rehash the gory details of Monday nights' 77-52 KU basketball loss to Temple.

The Jayhawks were as bad in this one as they were in the loss to Kentucky in the second game of the season, and, in some areas, may even have been worse.

Clearly, very few people saw a loss like this coming, given the way the Jayhawks have played lately and shown steady growth over the course of the season. The bottom line, though, is this team is still relying on a lot of young players and many of those guys are still learning how to play at this level, how to play for Bill Self and how to fit into leadership roles.

Many believed that Wayne Selden was poised to step right into that role as the unquestioned team leader, but, even if he has shown areas of improvement in that department, he's still a work in progress there. So is Perry Ellis, who has shown flashes of brilliance and moments of complete struggle, the highest of the highs and the lowest of the lows, all in the first 11 games.

Where Ellis and Selden go from here will be important, but clearly this team is in need of improvements in a bunch of areas and from a bunch of guys before Big 12 play gets started, which is now just two weeks away.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. is surrounded by Temple defenders during the Jayhawk's game against the Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. is surrounded by Temple defenders during the Jayhawk's game against the Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Quick takeaway

It'll be interesting to see how the Jayhawks respond to this loss, and I'm not just talking about how they play against Kent State next Tuesday. KU was exposed in some pretty important areas in the loss to Temple and there are teams in the Big 12 that have the right mix of personnel, swagger and talent to try to replicate what the Owls did to Kansas in this one. The easy thing to say is that KU will learn from this loss, work hard over the break and keep getting better. And I'm sure all of that is true. But KU's going to have to find a way to tweak what it does on both ends of the floor to prevent nights like this from happening again. We're not talking wholesale changes or anything drastic, but they have to find easier ways to score and also need to identify the right lineup that's willing to compete defensively every possession. The guys that will do that are the guys that will get the most minutes in the coming weeks.

Three reasons to smile

1 – Plenty has been said about Frank Mason's night and the guy deserves all the credit in the world for showing up to play on a night when most of his teammates didn't. Mason scored 20 points on 8-of-15 shooting — including 4-of-6 from three-point range — and added three steals and two assists. The most impressive number of them all, however, might have been the minutes played. Mason was on the floor for every second of the game, which only further proves (a) how valuable he is to this team and (b) how obvious it was that he was one of the few guys who was ready to battle.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III, drives against Temple defenders in the Jayhawk's loss to the Temple Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III, drives against Temple defenders in the Jayhawk's loss to the Temple Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

2 – His numbers did not reflect it, but I thought Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk turned in a second straight game where he looked much more like the Svi we saw early in the season than the Svi we saw during a recent slump. He was aggressive and willing to compete, even if his shots weren't falling either.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) tries to power his way to the goal past Temple defenders against the Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) tries to power his way to the goal past Temple defenders against the Owls Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

3 – You hate to use the old “wake-up call” line for one of the reasons to smile, but there weren't many others in this one so we'll go with it. So much has been made about KU's ability to find ways to win so far this season even on nights when it didn't play its best. That's a good trait for a team to have, but it's not a given. I think there's a chance that some of these guys — especially the younger dudes — started buying into the idea that all they had to do was show up and they'd find a way to pull out a win. That kind of belief and confidence is a good thing, so long as the team executes the first part, which is to show up. KU did not do that against Temple, and that'll be the lesson it can take away from an awful nigh heading into January.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – OK, so there were more like 30, but if we're going to narrow it down to just three, we'll begin with KU's terrible start. That first 10 minutes (and maybe even the first 3-5) really set the tone for the entire night. The Jayhawks looked disinterested, lazy, sluggish and, simply put, like they didn't want to be there. Off nights are going to happen. But with a roster this deep, talented and versatile I didn't think we'd see a night where almost every player in crimson and blue failed to bring it. Monday was one of those nights and the Jayhawks got what they deserved because of it.

2 – While that start was a tone-setter, KU's defense was what cost them most and eliminated any chance KU had to stay in the game. That was particularly true in the first half, when Temple's guards drove to the rim at will and the Owls' crisp ball movement led to open shot after open shot. Long story short — Temple got whatever it wanted on offense and KU looked powerless to stop it.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) tries to slide by a screen chasing Temple guard Will Cummings (2) Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) tries to slide by a screen chasing Temple guard Will Cummings (2) Monday at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA.

3 – Cliff Alexander continues to be a work in progress and, in some ways, may even have taken a step or two backwards these past couple of weeks. Early in the season, Alexander was getting by on energy, effort and raw ability, but, today, he seems to be over-thinking things and looks flat-out lost at times, particularly on defense. One sequence Monday night showed that better than any other. With KU still hanging around early in the second half, Alexander fired a 16-foot jumper early in the shot clock. It's not a terrible shot, and it's one he can make, but there's no need to take it when he did. On the very next possession, Temple ran a high ball screen and Alexander left his man to go double team, which allowed the guy he was guarding to slip effortlessly to the rim, where he received an easy pass and finished a bunny to add to Temple's lead. Even after starting, Alexander only played 17 minutes, took just the one shot and scored 2 points. The big freshman needs winter break to arrive as much as anybody.

One for the road

KU's beatdown at the hands of Temple on Monday:

• Snapped an eight-game winning streak, which was KU’s longest since an 18-game winning streak during the 2012-13 season.

• Made Kansas 9-2 or better for the fifth time in the Bill Self era.

• Dropped KU’s record away from Allen Fieldhouse to 5-2 this season and 1-1 in true road games.

• Made Kansas 8-4 all-time versus Temple and 60-17 against current members of the American Athletic Conference.

• Moved Self to 334-71 while at Kansas, 541-176 overall and 4-1 all-time against Temple.

• Made KU 2,135-824 all-time.

Next up

After going their separate ways for Christmas, the Jayhawks will return to action at Allen Fieldhouse on Dec. 30, when they'll take on Kent State at 7 p.m.

By the Numbers: Kansas blown out at Temple, 77-52

By the Numbers: Kansas blown out at Temple, 77-52

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Sources: Gene Wier expected to join KU football program

Information on the identity of new Kansas football coach David Beaty's coaching staff continues to be tough to come by, but sources told the Journal-World on Monday that legendary Olathe North football coach Gene Wier is expected to join Beaty's staff in the off-the-field coaching role.

That role, though not specified by the sources, likely will be something in the area of on-campus recruiting coordinator.

Such a role would seem to fit Wier perfectly. His knowledge of and connections in the high school football world in Kansas are second-to-none and the man who guided O-North to six state championships in the late 1990s and early 2000s also was a head coach for nine years in Texas before returning to the Sunflower State.

Wier's addition would bring the number of known people in Beaty's coaching staff to five — defensive coordinator/assistant head coach Clint Bowen, running backs coach/recruiting coordinator Reggie Mitchell, linebackers coach Kevin Kane, former special teams coach Louie Matsakis and Wier.

Stay tuned to KUsports.com for more updates.

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The Day After: Lapping Lafayette

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. (12) puts up a basket in the Jayhawk's 96-69 win over the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. (12) puts up a basket in the Jayhawk's 96-69 win over the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014.

Following Saturday's 96-69 victory over Lafayette — a game that was actually a much tougher battle than the final score indicates — Kansas University men's basketball coach Bill Self explained that he no longer would divulge his starting lineups after Cliff Alexander and Brannen Greene both were held out of the starting five just one day after it was announced that Alexander would join the group for the first time this season.

Greene was late to weights on Friday, Alexander had what Self called a bad day of practice that same day and Landen Lucas and Kelly Oubre slid into their spots.

I get where Self's coming from on this, but, after what we saw on Saturday it might not matter whether he announces his starters or not. It might just be that obvious. If Oubre continues to make the progress he's making and plays at all like he played on Saturday, he'll be in there. No questions asked.

After that it'll come down to the fifth spot, where Landen Lucas, Jamari Traylor and Cliff Alexander look like the top three options. Lucas and Traylor have had their chances. And they've been serviceable. But Alexander's the best of the three and the odds are good that he'll figure out how to handle his business away from game night sooner rather than later.

If he does, the starting five is easy to pick out — Frank Mason, Wayne Selden, Kelly Oubre, Perry Ellis and Cliff Alexander — and KU fans won't need to wait for it to be announced by Self or anybody else.

Quick takeaway

There were plenty of good things and a few bad things about Saturday's victory, but the fact that this team can throw so many good shooters on the floor makes them tough to handle. KU has shot the ball well from the outside through the first 10 games of the season and Self said before the season that he thought this group would be the best three-point shooting team he's had in a while. He was right. Mason, Selden, Oubre, Greene and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk all can knock down the three if given room and, with Perry Ellis and Cliff Alexander doing enough inside to occupy the paint, these guys are getting a lot of open looks and that should continue. KU is shooting just under 40 percent (62-for-157) from three-point range so far this season, and six different Jayhawks are shooting 34 percent or better from downtown. The Jayhawks were 12 of 23 from the outside against Lafayette and that clip helped keep the scrappy Leopards from creeping too close in the second half.

Three reasons to smile

1 – We already mentioned Oubre's big game, but it's worth mentioning again. The guy scored 23 points on 9-of-15 shooting and grabbed 10 rebounds, blowing out of the water his previous career-highs in both areas. But it was not just the final numbers that made his day so impressive. It was the way he got them. Oubre was aggressive, smooth, confidence and cagey. And he picked up his big line in relatively easy fashion. In fact, a single play in the first half that delivered two of Oubre's six misses might have been one of his most impressive moments. After misfiring on a wide open three-pointer from the left wing, Oubre immediately followed the miss, caught the rebound in mid-air and went right back up for what looked like it would be an easy put-back. It wasn't, as Oubre's follow had a little too much behind it and the second shot came clanging off the rim. Rather than get discouraged, Oubre dug in, kept fighting and saw that mentality pay off. He seemed pretty matter-of-fact about the game afterwards and it should be interesting to see how he responds to the breakthrough on Monday night.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. leaps for a basket against the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre, Jr. leaps for a basket against the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

2 – Welcome back, Svi. After looking out of sorts during the past few games, Mykhailiuk regained his old form and again looked sharp on Saturday. He scored 11 points, made three three-pointers, played 22 minutes and appeared to be having fun again. He also dished two assists and picked up a steal and appeared to be thinking less and playing loose a lot more. There's no doubt that seeing his outside shot fall again lifted his confidence.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) shoots in a three-point basket in the first-half against the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) shoots in a three-point basket in the first-half against the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

3 – A lot of KU fans want to talk about this team's tendency to let big leads slip away, but I don't think that's cause for concern, or at least not too much concern. Teams are going to make runs. Opponents aren't going to quit. In fact, they're probably going to play even harder when facing a big, double-digit deficit. That's to be expected. And the mark of a quality team, at least in my mind, is when it can watch a big lead slip away and find a way to dig back in and build it back up in the minutes that follow. KU did that a couple of times against Lafayette and these Jayhawks appear to be comfortable operating that way.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – KU has looked pretty good defensively when the games have gone up and down this year, but the Jayhawks struggled to keep the Leopards from finding their rhythm behind the three-point line in this one. The only reason this is worth sighing about is that it should have come as no surprise that Lafayette was going to fire away from the outside. KU's latest opponent came into Allen Fieldhouse shooting 42 percent from three-point range and had nothing even close to resembling an inside presence. Still, Lafayette knocked down 12 of 26 three-pointers (46 percent) and used the long-range bomb to crawl back into the game after KU looked to have put things away by halftime. With KU's depth, length and athleticism, there should not be too many teams that get as many easy and open looks from the outside as the Leopards did on Saturday.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) gets wrapped up by  Leopards defenders in KU's 96-69 win against Lafayette Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) gets wrapped up by Leopards defenders in KU's 96-69 win against Lafayette Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

2 – Landen Lucas may not only have lost his starting job, but he may also have lost a good chunk of his minutes. The big man who made a late start in place of Cliff Alexander played just six minutes and went from being in the starting lineup at the beginning of the day to being on the floor in the final two minutes when Tyler Self, Evan Manning, Josh Pollard and Christian Garrett were getting their time, as well. Lucas missed the only two shots he attempted, including a bad miss of a sweet dime from Selden, and grabbed just one rebound and picked up one foul. Self has said he'd like to play five perimeter guys — Mason, Selden, Greene, Svi and Oubre — and possibly four big men, with Ellis, Alexander and Traylor being locks. That leaves that final spot to a battle between Lucas and Hunter Mickelson. And I don't think you have to look any farther than Saturday to see who might be in the lead there. Oh, and that could quickly turn into six perimeter guys and three bigs if Devonte' Graham can come back healthy.

Kansas center Hunter Mickelson is congratulated by coach Bill Self during KU's 96-69 win over the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Hunter Mickelson is congratulated by coach Bill Self during KU's 96-69 win over the Lafayette Leopards Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

3 – It's a minor thing but I noticed it a few times during Saturday's victory. Jamari Traylor seems to have a hard time closing the door on the trap when the Jayhawks pick up with some full-court pressure. It's not something to be too concerned about given the fact that the other team's point guard should be quicker than Traylor and able to avoid getting trapped, but it just looked like Traylor struggled to execute when he was asked to do this. He didn't use the sideline to his advantage, got caught bouncing instead of closing out and put the Jayhawks at a numbers disadvantage by doing it.

One for the road

KU's victory over the visiting Leopards on Saturday:

• Extended Kansas’ winning streak to eight games, which is KU’s longest since an 18-game winning streak during the 2012-13 season.

• Made the Jayhawks 9-1 or better for the second time in the past three seasons and the sixth time in Bill Self’s 12 seasons at KU.

• Pushed KU to 1-0 all-time versus Lafayette and 9-2 against current membership of the Patriot League.

• Made Kansas 4-0 in Allen Fieldhouse this season.

• Made KU 717-109 all-time in Allen Fieldhouse, including 179-9 under Self.

• Improved Self to 334-70 while at Kansas, 541-175 overall and 1-0 all-time against Lafayette.

• Made the Jayhawks 2,135-823 all-time.

Next up

The Jayhawks will travel to Philadelphia for their final game before Christmas on Monday against Temple at the Wells Fargo Center. Tip-off is scheduled for 6 p.m. and the game will be shown on ESPN2. After that, KU will close out 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse on Dec. 30, when the Jayhawks welcome Kent State to town for a 7 p.m. game on Jayhawk TV.

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Lafayette, 96-69

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Lafayette, 96-69

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Mid-year signing day opens with a flurry for KU football

Defensive Back L.B. Bates, of Trinity Valley C.C., signed his official letter of intent with Kansas football early this morning.

Defensive Back L.B. Bates, of Trinity Valley C.C., signed his official letter of intent with Kansas football early this morning. by Matt Tait

12:31 p.m. Update

It looks like everything worked out with Blinn College offensive lineman Jayson Rhodes' transcripts because KU is now announcing him as a member of today's mid-year transfer haul.

Rhodes, who got in with KU late after offensive lineman Delonte' Murray changed his mind and signed with Cincinnati, is a 6-foot-4, 310-pound guard who had offers from Grambling State, Hampton, Louisiana-Lafayette, Louisiana-Monroe, Southern Miss and UT-San Antonio.

He'll arrive at KU in time for spring football and will have three years of eligibility remaining, which makes him a guy the KU coaching staff can bring along slowly if need be. That's not to say he'll need it, just that they'll have that flexibility.

The addition of Rhodes brings KU's total haul for the day to seven — 3 offensive linemen, 2 defensive backs, 1 defensive lineman and 1 running back.

Here's a quick look at Rhodes' film and bio.

RHODES BIO: Played one season at Blinn College under head coach Keith Thomas... Helped lead the Buccaneers to a 4-4 mark in 2014... Earned second team all-conference honors in 2014... Started the season on the defensive side of the ball, before moving to the offensive line... Sat out the 2013 season as a redshirt.

Original Post: 9:49 a.m.

It's not quite the spectacle that national signing day in February brings, but it's important nonetheless. And it's already well under way for the Kansas University football program.

Mid-year transfer signing day offers those junior-college players who were able to graduate in December the chance to sign their national letters of intent early so they can report to their new schools in time for the spring semester, which begins in late January, and, more importantly, the start of spring practices.

Here's a quick list of the new Jayhawks who made it official this morning, starting with Kilgore College cornerback M.J. Mathis, who signed his letter at 8 a.m. in his hometown of Crosby, Texas, with a few close friends and family members present.

New KU cornerback Michael Mathis, from Kilgore College, was one of five players to make their commitments official this morning on mid-year transfer signing day.

New KU cornerback Michael Mathis, from Kilgore College, was one of five players to make their commitments official this morning on mid-year transfer signing day. by Matt Tait

Mathis, a 6-foot-2, 210-pound corner with a good mix of physical presence and legit speed, said signing his letter was an amazing feeling because it put an official end to a couple of stressful months that came with waiting for KU to change coaches and signing day to arrive.

Here's a quick look at some Mathis highlights:

Other new Jayhawks who signed this morning include:

• Will Smith, a 6-foot-4, 315-pound, three-star offensive lineman from Butler Community College, who committed to KU in early June after an official visit.

SMITH BIO: Played two seasons on the offensive line for the nationally-ranked Grizzlies... Coached by Troy Morrell at BCC... Earned a three-star rating from Rivals.com and 247Sports.com... Saw action in 11 games for the Grizzlies, helping them earn an 8-3 overall record in 2014... Picked up all-conference and all-region honors in 2014... Helped lead the Grizzlies to the 2013 conference and region titles.

• Jacky Dezir, a 6-3, 305-pound, two-star defensive lineman from College of DuPage, who also committed to KU in early June after an official visit.

DEZIR BIO: Spent two seasons at the College of DuPage playing for head coach Matt Foster... Sat out the 2014 season as a redshirt... Played in 10 games for the Chaparrals, helping them earn a 7-4 record in 2013… Recorded two sacks in the 2013 Carrier Dome Bowl against ASA College… Recorded 24 total tackles during the 2013 season, including 13 solo tackles... Also credited with 3.0 TFLs.

• Bazie "L.B." Bates IV, a 6-1, 195-pound, three-star defensive back from Trinity Valley C.C., who committed to KU in late June. Name is pronounced Baz-ee.

BATES BIO: Spent two seasons at Trinity Valley Community College suiting up for head coach Brad Smiley… A three-star prospect according to Rivals.com, 247Sports.com and Scout.com... Played as a cornerback on the 2014 team that was a perfect 12-0 in 2014… Helped lead the Cardinals to the SWJCFC championship, the Region XIV championship and the Heart of Texas Bowl title in 2014... Recorded 26 total tackles, including 16 solo stops, as a sophomore in 2014... Led TVCC with four interceptions... Also had four pass breakups... Spent the 2013 season as a redshirt... Collected 11 tackles and one pass breakup for TVCC as a freshman in 2012.

• D'Andre Banks, a 6-3, 325-pound, three-star offensive lineman also from Trinity Valley, C.C., who committed to Kansas after an official visit last weekend. Banks had been committed to Louisiana-Lafayette, but switched to Kansas after his visit.

BANKS BIO: Played two seasons at Trinity Valley Community College for head coach Brad Smiley… A three-star prospect according to Rivals.com... Saw action as an offensive guard on the 2014 team that went undefeated (12-0) in 2014… Helped lead the Cardinals to the SWJCFC championship, the Region XIV championship and the Heart of Texas Bowl title in both 2013 and 2014...Spent the 2012 season as a redshirt.

"Coach (David) Beaty is a great guy and has a plan for the program,” Banks said shortly after committing. “I want to be a part of it. The facilities are excellent and it feels like a tight-knit community."

• Ke'aun Kinner, a 5-10, 185-pound, three-star running back from Navarro Junior College, who committed to KU earlier this week and was named a first-team Juco All-American on Tuesday.

KINNER BIO: Suited up for two seasons at Navarro Junior College under head coach J.J. Eckert... Earned a three-star ranking from Rivals.com, 247Sports.com and Scout.com... Finished his two-year career at NJC ranked third all-time in rushing yardage (1,918 yards) and ninth all-time in carries (277)… Ranked second in single-season carries and topped the single-season per game rushing average list in NJC history… Rushed for 1,696 yards and 22 touchdowns on 253 carries in 2014… Also caught 17 passes for 109 yards through the air... Earned First Team National Junior College Athletic Assocation (NJCAA) All-American honors in 2014... In his two-year career at Navarro he recorded 26 rushing touchdowns… Named the Southwest Junior College Football Conference's Most Valuable Player in 2014.

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News and notes from a few former Jayhawks in the NFL

Former Kansas University cornerback Aqib Talib continues to prove he's one of the top cover corners in the NFL during his first season with the Denver Broncos.

Talib, who has battled injuries throughout this season and his career, has started 13 games for the Broncos this season — opposite his former KU running mate Chris Harris — and is tied for the team lead with three interceptions after snagging a key pick against Phillip Rivers and the Chargers last weekend in a victory which clinched the Broncos' fourth AFC West title in a row.

Talib was at his best against San Diego and was constantly highlighted for his impeccable technique and great instincts. He has 55 tackles this season — 48 of the solo variety — and already has as many passes defended this season (14) as he did all of last season with the Patriots.

Talib's lockdown ability has been one of the biggest reasons the Broncos' defense has improved by leaps and bounds over last year's group, and, as long as he's healthy, Talib continues to show why he's regarded as one of the league's best cornerbacks and, even more to the point, why he makes so much money.

Harris cashes in
Former KU cornerback Chris Harris, now in his fourth year with the Denver Broncos, agreed to a five-year contract extension worth more than $42 million.

Harris, regarded by many as one of the top all-around cornerbacks in the league, is enjoying his best season as a pro on the heels of offseason ACL surgery.

He joined Denver as an undrafted free agent in 2011 for a $2,000 signing bonus. Harris already has tied his career high with three interceptions this season and has 48 tackles, 46 of them of the solo variety.

McDougald's monster day
Former Kansas wide-receiver-turned-safety Bradley McDougald played the best game of his young NFL career on Sunday, finishing with 15 tackles — 11 solo — in Tampa Bay's 19-17 loss to Carolina.

McDougald, another undrafted free agent who is in his second year with the Bucaneers, has started three of the 13 games he has played in this year and has 37 tackles and three passes defended.

Johnson fitting in fine
Injuries have depleted the Denver Broncos' linebacking corps and that has opened the door for former Jayhawk Steven Johnson — yet another undrafted free agent — to slide into the starting lineup.

Johnson, now in his third season in the NFL, has played in 12 games for the Broncos this season and started the past five.

He finished Sunday's victory over San Diego tied for third on the team with four tackles — all solo — and now has 27 tackles on the season to go along with a half sack and a fumble recovery.

Stuckey scores
Former KU safety Darrell Stuckey was pretty quiet during the Chargers' loss to Denver last Sunday, but one week earlier, the Kansas City, Kansas, native scored the first touchdown of his NFL career on a fumble recovery and return during the Chargers' loss to New England.

Still known for his contributions on special teams, Stuckey has appeared in 14 games this season (his fifth in the NFL) and has 27 tackles and two passes defended to go along with the TD.

Opurum picked up
After spending the past couple of seasons as a part of the Houston Texans' practice squad (he was even active for a game or two) former KU running back/defensive end Toben Opurum has been picked up by the New Orleans Saints and signed to their practice squad.

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Bringing perspective to Beaty’s big weekend

Newly named Kansas University football coach David Beaty made up for lost time in the recruiting grind last weekend by not only getting 11 members of the Class of 2015 to visit campus and but also by picking up seven oral commitments since Saturday night.

The first future Jayhawk to commit came Saturday evening, four more prospects joined him on Sunday and the latest to pledge their services to Kansas delivered the good news bright and early Monday morning and again early Monday afternoon.

The news of these commitments spread like wildfire on KU message boards and Twitter and added even more shine to Beaty's reputation as a solid recruiter.

But it's not necessarily the players who Beaty picked up that made his weekend haul impressive. It was the fact that he was able to pull it all together so quickly in the first place and without much of his coaching staff on board that caught my eye.

Beaty had prior relationships with a couple of the guys who committed, but he had had no contact whatsoever with a couple of the others. The fact that those guys were not only willing to visit Kansas, but, in some cases, also visited despite already having committed elsewhere speaks to the strength of Beaty's relationships in Texas.

At least a couple of these prospects said the bond between Beaty and their high school coach carried enough weight for them to give KU a look. After that, the ball was in Beaty's court, and, Beaty, like so many coaches who came before him in his current job, has said he believed KU's chances of landing a guy increase dramatically if he can just get guys to visit campus.

That proved to be true with half a dozen guys in the past few days, and, although they might not all pan out, they seem to be the kinds of players KU needs to sign to get the rebuilding project off the ground.

Most of them are good athletes with impressive resumes, and many of them were overlooked by the “big schools” because those places fill their commitment lists with four- and five-star guys each year, not the two- and three-star guys who came to campus last weekend.

If nothing else, that idea should offer a little perspective for the furious weekend of recruiting that was. These guys all appear to be worthy prospects. And a couple of them have some impressive size, skills and stats. But they're far from a guarantee and they still need to be coached and developed and put through the grind of college football before we really have any idea what kind of players they can be — especially in the Big 12 Conference.

Beaty knows that. And he's willing to put the time in to make it happen. He's also planning to hire a coaching staff that thinks the same way.

Recruiting is a contagious business. Year after year, with program after program, fans often get caught up in the hype and promise of what a prospect looks like on paper or what his high school statistics might lead them to dream he could become in college. It's understandable. But at a place like KU, it's important to remember both sides of the coin. Given the fact that so many recent recruits have failed to pan out, that should not be too hard to remember for Jayhawk football fans.

That's not to diminish what Beaty and company accomplished this weekend, though. What they did was impressive. And it's important mostly because it shows — with actions rather than words — what Beaty is all about when it comes to recruiting. Substance over style.

See, two years ago at this time, the Kansas football program was in the middle of building what was dubbed the #DreamTeam2013. It was made up mostly of highly ranked junior-college prospects and featured some incredibly outgoing personalities, many of whom now appear to have something to fall back on in terms of a marketing and promotions career since the whole big-time football thing did not work out.

To be fair, a few of the guys in that “Dream Team” class did make a significant impact on the KU program. Dexter McDonald and Cassius Sendish were two-year starters in the secondary, Ngalu Fusimalohi and Mike Smithburg started both of their seasons on the O-Line and Trevor Pardula single-handedly fixed KU's punting woes.

But those were not the guys who were talking the most during the recruiting period. Guys like Marquel Combs, Marcus Jenkins-Moore, Chris Martin and others were the names that wowed people — as much for their excitement and enthusiasm as their rankings — but those guys never played a down for the Jayhawks. And their failure to pan out and eventual departures from the program left a hole in KU's roster that Beaty is now trying to fill.

He'll have to be creative to do it, and he'll have to work twice as hard as he would at an established program. But, again, he appears to be ready and willing to do just that and what he got done last weekend was definitely a good start.

MORE FROM THE RECRUITING TRAIL...

• KU adds 5 players during busy weekend

• Texas WR becomes 6th commitment in 3 days

• Juco RB Ke'aun Kinner picks Kansas

• Quick look at KU's Class of 2015 recruiting haul thus far

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The Day After: Survival at Sprint Center

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hooks a backdoor pass around Utah forward Brekkott Chapman (0) to teammate  Perry Ellis (34) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hooks a backdoor pass around Utah forward Brekkott Chapman (0) to teammate Perry Ellis (34) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center. by Nick Krug

Say what you will about the sluggish second half, the Kansas University men's basketball team on Saturday at Sprint Center again found a way to win a grinder, 63-60 over No. 13 Utah.

The game featured one of KU's best halves of the season and also one of its worst, as the Jayhawks (8-1) raced out to a 42-21 lead behind a strong first half and then saw that lead erased when a less-than-stellar second half.

Hot free throw shooting, more solid three-point shooting and that hard-to-describe quality that allows this team to scratch out a victory in the waning minutes all benefited the Jayhawks on Saturday in a game that featured a couple of teams that played incredibly hard but at different times.

KU was lights out in the first half. After struggling to get the offense going, the Jayhawks started making shots and never let their defense slip, suffocating the Utes into 35 percent first-half shooting and 10 turnovers.

The two teams flipped roles in the second half, when KU shot just 26 percent and committed seven turnovers, which allowed the Utes to climb all the way back into it and set up the dramatic finish.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) huddles the Jayhawks before free throw attempts by Brannen Greene with seconds to play during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) huddles the Jayhawks before free throw attempts by Brannen Greene with seconds to play during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway

Heading into the opening game of the Orlando Classic, the Jayhawks knew that they were in for a rough stretch of games. Rather than giving in to the difficulty of the schedule or leaning on their youth and inexperience as an excuse, the Jayhawks pulled together, played tough and won six straight games in the face of just about every kind of adversity you could imagine. This team is still a work in progress and there remains a lot of room for improvement, but what they've been able to do during the past few weeks makes you believe that these guys are ready to defend their 10 consecutive Big 12 titles and go hunting for No. 11.

Three reasons to smile

1 – For the second game in a row, freshman Kelly Oubre looked comfortable and made some consistent positive contributions. Oubre scored nine points in 17 minutes and hit all five of his free throw attempts while also grabbing three rebounds. It's not the numbers that are worth noting, rather the way he looks a look more sure of himself and confident in what he's doing.

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre Jr. (12) eyes the ball as he defends Utah guard Delon Wright (55) during the first half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center

Kansas guard Kelly Oubre Jr. (12) eyes the ball as he defends Utah guard Delon Wright (55) during the first half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center by Nick Krug

2 – One of these days, KU's free throw shooting will just be a given and won't qualify as a reason to smile. Today is not that day. The Jayhawks drained 21 of 23 free throws, including all 10 they attempted in the first half and needed just about every one of them to hold off the Utes. Brannen Greene, who stepped into the starting lineup for Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk but didn't do much most of the game, knocked down four in a row in the final minute to help seal the victory. As a team, KU hit all eight of its free throw attempts in the final five minutes.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) gets inside for a bucket and a foul from Utah forward Jakob Poeltl (42) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) gets inside for a bucket and a foul from Utah forward Jakob Poeltl (42) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center by Nick Krug

3 – Jamari Traylor came back with a purpose. Having a good game is no reason to excuse an arrest, but it was clear from the way he played that Traylor was trying to make up for his mistake. He still had a couple of inexplicable mistakes — a terrible pass here, a turnover there — but he hit 4 of 8 shots, all 5 of his free throws and finished with 13 points and 5 boards. The most impressive thing about Traylor's play to me was that he looked relaxed.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – KU's second-half offense was awful. Not only did the Jayhawks shoot just 26 percent and make just six field goals, but there were way too many one-on-five possessions, when the ball didn't move and the Jayhawks just threw up some wild shot or turned it over. With several guys on the roster feeling comfortable and looking locked in from three-point range of late, better ball movement and less pounding could lead to open three-pointers and better possessions. In short, pretty much what you saw in the first half.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) chases down a loose ball lost by Utah forward Jakob Poeltl (42) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) chases down a loose ball lost by Utah forward Jakob Poeltl (42) during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center by Nick Krug

2 – Landen Lucas' time in the starting lineup is probably pretty close to ending. Lucas missed his only two shot attempts — showing once again that he lacks the strength and explosion to finish at the rim — and the only other statistic he recorded was his two turnovers. No rebounds. No assists. No blocks. No free throws. Lucas has done an admirable job during the first nine games, but he's clearly not the guy the Jayhawks need out there and it seems the coaching staff gets that, as evident by his seven minutes against Utah.

Kansas head coach Bill Self questions a play by forward Landen Lucas during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center

Kansas head coach Bill Self questions a play by forward Landen Lucas during the second half on Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014 at Sprint Center by Nick Krug

3 – Remember that shoulder issue that once plagued freshman Devonte' Graham? It never really materialized into something to worry about, but the point guard's latest injury is. Graham is expected to miss four weeks — perhaps longer — with a toe injury and the news comes at the worst time. Graham played very good basketball in his past two games and really looked to be getting comfortable out there, both with his role on the team and with the jump to college basketball as a whole. His absence will be a blow to this team.

One for the road

KU's latest win in Kansas City...

• Extended its win streak to seven-straight games, matching its longest win streak of last season.

• Was the fourth-straight win for KU by six points or fewer.

• Made the Jayhawks 8-1 for the second time in the last three seasons and the sixth time in Bill Self's 12 seasons at Kansas.

• Improved Kansas’ lead in the all-time series to 2-0.

• Improved KU's record to 5-1 in games away from Allen Fieldhouse this season.

• Upped the Jayhawks’ all-time record at Sprint Center to 25-5 and 210-79 in games played in Kansas City.

• Gave Bill Self his first victory against Utah, making him 1-1 vs. the Utes, 333-70 at Kansas and 540-175 overall.

• Made KU's all-time record 2,134-823.

Next up

The Jayhawks will get a break from their rough and rugged schedule, as they'll be off all week until next Saturday's 2 p.m. home game against Lafayette.

By the numbers: Kansas beats Utah, 63-60

By the numbers: Kansas beats Utah, 63-60

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Busy week for Beaty produces lengthy list of visitors for big recruiting weekend

Kansas University football recruiting.

Kansas University football recruiting.

Newly hired Kansas University football coach David Beaty has not spent his first week on the job rearranging the office furniture or hanging up his favorite photos by his desk. There will be time for that later.

The past week has been spent tracking talent, visiting coaches and lining up an impressive list of visitors for this weekend, the final big recruiting weekend before the next dead period. With 12 players in the Class of 2015 already committed, KU has room for about 12 more. Many of the visitors who will be in town this weekend are high school prospects, which is in line with what Beaty said would be the foundation upon which the KU program was built during his time in town.

Two of this weekend's visitors — WR Kevin Thomas and QB Ryan Willis — already have committed to Kansas, so, even if KU were to land all of the guys it brings in this weekend, it would leave the new coaching staff room to add at least a couple more players.

This weekend's visit list is heavy on offensive linemen and wide receivers — two areas of great need for the Jayhawks — but it's not just the names of the players or their place in the rankings that is impressive about this group. The more impressive part is that Beaty was able, in such short time, to get so many guys to committ to campus visits so quickly. The state of Kansas is also well represented, with three of the 11 guys coming from Kansas high schools, an area Beaty said would be a top priority moving forward.

Jon Kirby of JayhawkSlant.com reported earlier this week that several Texas high school coaches had reached out to Beaty about some of their players who may have been a little overlooked thus far in the recruiting process, and it's that kind of pedigree that had many on the search committee excited about the idea of hiring Beaty in the first place. The fact that it has started to pay off in his first week on the job is merely a bonus.

Of course, just getting them here is only half of the battle. Beaty and company still have to get these guys to commit and, even if they do, the players themselves still have to show up and pan out. There's time for that, though.

Here's a quick look at the guys coming in for a visit this weekend, according to Rivals.com's visit tracker:

• Kyle Ball, 6-2, 231 D-End, Shawnee Mission East
The two-start prospect picked up an offer from KU during Clint Bowen's interim term and helped lead the Lancers to a state title in the process. Big, physical and athletic all over the field, Ball has offers from Air Force and South Dakota State and also recently made an unofficial visit to Kansas State.

• D'Andre Banks — 6-3, 325, OL, Trinity Valley (Texas) Community College
Three-star offensive guard currently has offers from Louisiana-Lafayette, Utah State and Kansas. Also received early interest from Florida State and Illinois.

• Colton Beebe – 6-2, 252, LB, Piper High
Another local kid, Beebe has been closed in the sub-4.8 range in the 40-yard dash and also bench presses 315 pounds and owns a 4.13 grade-point average. The two-star prospect has offers from Air Force, Minnesota and Kansas. He's been looking forward to visiting KU since receiving an offer in September and said throughout the season that he was impressed by what Clint Bowen had done with the team.

• Xavier Castille – 5-11, 195, WR, Rockwall (Texas) High
Two-star receiver with a good build and excellent speed has all kinds of offers from mid-major type programs including Uconn, Illinois State, Memphis, Nevada, Texas State, Tulsa and UTEP along with KU and Washington. Under-the-radar wideout is known for good hands and crisp routes.

• Arico Evans – 6-2, 190, Athlete, Hillcrest High, Dallas
Two-star prospect has offers from KU, Indiana, New Mexico, New Mexico State, TCU, Texas Tech and Troy. This week's contact was the first Evans had received from Kansas, but he said he was very interested because of his high school coach's close bond with Beaty.

• Brandon Martin – 6-3, 185, WR, Prime Prep Academy, Dallas
Another prospect from the Deion Sanders school, this three-star receiver is ranked as the 98th best wideout in the nation and the 100th best player in Texas. He has received offers from Louisiana Tech, Louisville, Temple, Arkansas State and KU and has been named to the Under-Armour All-American roster.

• Emmanuel Moore – 6-0, 190, WR, Northwest High, Justin, Texas
Two-star receiver committed to North Texas back in September, but is visiting KU this weekend, according to Rivals.com. KU and UNT are his only offers as of now but he also has received interest from Minnesota and SMU.

• Tyler Moore – 6-4, 300, OL, North Shore High, Galena Park, Texas
Three-star center has multiple offers from some big time programs including BYU, Minnesota, Texas, Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana Tech and Oregon State. Moore plans to graduate in December and would be free to report to his new school in time for spring practices.

• Jace Sternberger – 6-4, 225, D-End, Kingfisher (Oklahoma) High
Two-star prospect has offers from KU, New Mexico, Sam Houston State and South Dakota and also received interest from Kansas State, Memphis, Oklahoma State and Tulsa. Known as a good all-around athlete. Also plays tight end.

• Kevin Thomas – 6-2, 180, WR, DeSoto (Texas) High
Three-star wide receiver committed to KU in July after receiving a dozen offers from schools including Clemson, Nebraska, Wake Forest and Wisconsin. Big, physical wideout remained committed throughout the coaching change and is regarded by some as one of KU's top targets in the current class.

• Ryan Willis – 6-4, 201, QB, Bishop Miege
Three-star pro-style QB committed to Kansas in May and stayed strong throughout another rough season and a change in leadership. After throwing for 3,000 yards and 30 TDs as a junior, Willis followed that up with another 3,000-yard season and 35 TDs in leading the Stags to a state title this season. He completed 64 percent of his passes. Willis met with Beaty earlier this week and came away impressed by the new coach's energy and passion for KU.

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The Day After: A doozy in D.C.

The Jayhawks stand for the National Anthem prior to tipoff against Georgetown on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C.

The Jayhawks stand for the National Anthem prior to tipoff against Georgetown on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. by Nick Krug

Wednesday night's 75-70 victory over Georgetown in Washington D.C., sure seemed like the most entertaining KU game of the year so far.

It featured two teams that each threw five guys onto the floor at pretty much all times who competed their butts off on every possession, for points, rebounds, loose balls and floor burns.

I'm sure for fans of both teams, there were plenty of moments when you wanted to pull your hair out or pound the table, but if you're just a college basketball fan and you flipped the TV to Fox Sports 1 last night, I'm guessing you were wildly entertained from start to finish.

For the Jayhawks, the game featured a little bit of everything – tough play, solid defense, three-point shooting and easy buckets at the rim. It also included a couple of tough moments in which the Jayhawks (7-1) were forced to withstand a couple of storms from the Hoyas and the home crowd.

I know KU fans expect the Jayhawks to win every time they hit the floor, but it's time to take a moment to appreciate what this team has done during the past couple of weeks. Victories over Rhode Island, Tennessee, Michigan State, Florida and Georgetown would make a pretty good tournament resume come March. The fact that KU won these games consecutively and so early in the season shows you just how talented this group could be by the end of the season.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) pushes the ball up the court on a breakaway during the second half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) pushes the ball up the court on a breakaway during the second half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway

For me, Wednesday's victory was not just about Brannen Greene going bananas from downtown to lead the Jayhawks to victory. It was about the Jayhawks' ability to respond. It seemed like every time Georgetown threw a punch, the Jayhawks threw one back and regained control of the game. After watching their 13-point first-half lead disappear, KU responded with a strong finish to the half when Frank Mason drove hard to the rim in the waning seconds and hit a tough layup to put Kansas up two at the break. Later, after Georgetown tied the game at 58 with a three-pointer, Mason immediately answered on the other end with a three-pointer to put KU ahead again. And, of course, there was the stretch early in the second half when the Hoyas built a three-point lead and looked to be on the brink of taking control only to see KU respond with a Greene three-pointer, a tough defensive stand and another Greene trey in the next three trips. Those were just a few examples of how KU showed its resolve all night. And that could have been, by far, the most important thing this young team gained from its latest victory.

Three reasons to smile

1 – How about KU's three-point shooting? Led by Greene's 5-of-5 showing, the Jayhawks finished 10 of 17 from downtown, with five different players knocking down at least one shot from behind the arc. Consistent and quality three-point shooting has been missing for Kansas during the past couple of seasons, and, at least lately, this team has shown it has the ability to light it up from the outside in its arsenal.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) puts up a three over Georgetown guard Jabril Trawick (55) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) puts up a three over Georgetown guard Jabril Trawick (55) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. by Nick Krug

2 – Overall, I thought KU's defense was pretty good. Frank Mason played one of his best defensive games of the season — all on a bum ankle — and the Jayhawks held Georgetown to 40 percent shooting, 39 percent in the second half. Georgetown's starting back court shot just 4-of-17 from the floor and the Hoyas coughed it up 16 times while Kansas out-rebounded the physically imposing home team by two. KU also swiped nine steals by five different players and many of those led to transition opportunities, which should be a huge part of the winning recipe for a team this deep, athletic and talented.

Georgetown guard D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera (4) drives against Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C.

Georgetown guard D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera (4) drives against Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. by Nick Krug

3 – Perry Ellis did not lead the Jayhawks in scoring, but he sure was fantastic. He finished with a double-double of 13 points and 10 boards in 39 minutes and shot just 4-of-15 from the floor, but was aggressive all night and just missed on so many shots that would've turned that pointed total into 25 in a hurry. What's more impressive is that played all those minutes and grabbed all those boards while fouling just once. Ellis also added three steals and two blocks to his stat line and his minutes, boards and smaller stats more than made up for the missed shots.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – Whether it's been a six-point lead, a 10-point lead or the 13-point lead we saw in the first half against Georgetown, the Jayhawks have shown an ability to get complacent at times and watch control of the game slip away. Clearly, KU was able to grind this one out, but there's no way that a 28-15 lead in the first half should have been 34-32 at the break. Turnovers, missed shots and Georgetown waking up all contributed to the slip, but this team still needs to learn how to turn that 13-point advantage into a 20-point lead while going for the knockout blow instead of allowing the opponent to crawl back into it. A lot of that comes from leadership and experience, both of which are works in progress on this roster.

Kansas guard Devonte Graham (4) lays out while competing for a loose ball with Georgetown forward Isaac Copeland (11) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. At right is Georgetown guard D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera (4).

Kansas guard Devonte Graham (4) lays out while competing for a loose ball with Georgetown forward Isaac Copeland (11) during the first half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. At right is Georgetown guard D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera (4). by Nick Krug

2 – The Jayhawks made just eight field goals in the second half and shot 33 percent for the half and 38 percent for the game. A big reason for that was Ellis' 11 misses and a big reason it didn't kill them was the red-hot three-point shooting and 32 trips to the free throw line. Five of KU's eight second-half field goals were three pointers and the Jayhawks made 20 of 24 free throws in the second half. Even though they survived, though, the poor shooting in the second half is worth noting because it — along with those three-point tries — points to KU still struggling a little to get good shots in its halfcourt offense.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene (14) heads to the bucket past Georgetown forward Paul White (13) during the second half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C.

Kansas guard Brannen Greene (14) heads to the bucket past Georgetown forward Paul White (13) during the second half on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 at Verizon Center in Washington D.C. by Nick Krug

3 – Brannen Greene was celebrated from coast to coast for the way he shot the ball and he definitely should've been, but imagine what the guy could do if he played just a little better defense and didn't foul quite so easily. There's still time for improvement in both of those areas, and, if it comes, Greene's 18 minutes against Georgetown could easily have turned into 25 or more and there's no telling what kind of point total that would've led to the way he was shooting the ball.

One for the road

KU's hard-fought road win in the nation's capital...

• Extended its win streak to six-straight games.

• Made the Jayhawks 7-1 for the second time in the last three seasons and the seventh time in Bill Self's 12 seasons at Kansas.

• Improved Kansas’ lead in the all-time series with Georgetown to 3-1.

• Kept Self unbeaten against Georgetown (3-0) and made him 332-70 at Kansas and 539-175 overall.

• Improved KU's all-time record 2,133-823.

Next up

The Jayhawks return to the area this weekend and will take on No. 13 Utah at 2:15 p.m. at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The Utes (6-1) are off to one of the best starts in school history and figure to be yet another solid challenge in a stretch of tough games for Kansas.

By the Numbers: Kansas wins 75-70 at Georgetown

By the Numbers: Kansas wins 75-70 at Georgetown

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2015 Jayhawks have some talent but may lack depth

New KU football coach David Beaty on Monday made it clear that he understood the challenges he was stepping into by taking the job to lead the Jayhawks in 2015 and beyond.

Although the list is long and includes everything from production on the field to mending fences off of it, it seems one of the best places to get a clear look at Beaty's biggest challenge is by scanning the potential depth chart heading into the 2015 season.

Gone are 21 seniors, many of whom played key roles — especially on defense — on this year's team and during the past few seasons, as well. In some areas, there are obvious options to replace them. In others, the question of "Who's next?" is a little tougher to answer.

Several weeks ago, Tom Keegan looked at KU's Top 10 returning players but did so from a 1-through-10 perspective. All of those guys will be on the list you're about to read, as well, but instead of a Top 10, I'll give you a Top 22, as in an incredibly early look at a starting 11 on both sides of the ball for the 2015 season.

There's no doubt this will change between now and September. Heck, it'll probably change between now and February and again by the start of spring practice sometime in March. But it never hurts to look ahead and, in doing so, I think you'll see that Beaty is inheriting a team with some significant returning talent but an alarming lack of depth.

Most of this is based on the guys who have experience, which, for now, is as important a factor as anything. We'll get into the guys who could knock them off — think defensive lineman D.J. Williams, incoming cornerback Michael Mathis and a couple of other guys like that — in future blogs.

Also for the sake of this blog, we'll assume the Jayhawks are going to go with the same base defense they used this year.

Here we go...

Kansas receiver Nigel King is forced out of bounds after a catch against Iowa State defensive back Sam Richardson during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014.

Kansas receiver Nigel King is forced out of bounds after a catch against Iowa State defensive back Sam Richardson during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014. by Nick Krug

OFFENSE:

QB – Michael Cummings – Freshman-to-be Ryan Willis will be an intriguing option here, but Cummings earned the right to be the man to beat with his play this season.

RB – Corey Avery – De'Andre Mann is also back and both should be better than they were this season.

LT – Larry Mazyck – With another offseason to work on his skills and his body, the big man could be a nice option here.

LG – Joe Gibson – Filled in well at Center this season, but should be able to transition to guard with no problem.

C – Jacob Bragg – He doesn't have any experience, but guys kept mentioning his name.

RG – Junior Visinia – Picked up some incredibly valuable experience down the stretch and should only get better.

RT – Jordan Shelley-Smith – I really think this guy is going to be solid for a couple of years.

TE – Ben Johnson – Filled in nicely for Mundine from time to time and brings similar athleticism and good hands.

WR – Nigel King – The unquestioned No. 1 option on this team. His chemistry with Cummings should be a big advantage.

WR – Tre' Parmalee – It's possible one of the young guys beats Parmalee out, but he's a solid route runner and a reliable option who's been out there plenty.

WR – Kent Taylor – I always heard the transfer from Florida was best out wide and I don't think it's a stretch for him to transition to WR with Johnson holding down the TE spot.

DEFENSE:

BUCK – Ben Goodman – The move to the interior was not one that should stick. Time to put him back at his natural position.

NT – Andrew Bolton – After a slow start, he had some very good moments during the second half of the season.

DT – T.J. Semke – This is a prime spot where you could see an upgrade, but I guarantee you Semke's not going to give up the job easily.

SE – Kapil Fletcher - Damani Mosby and Anthony Olobia also could factor in here, but Fletcher was the only one of the trio who actually played in 2014.

WLB – Courtney Arnick – He quietly had a solid season and fits the mold of the modern-day Big 12 linebacker.

MLB – Jake Love – Filled in for Heeney whenever he needed to and, at times, was just as effective. Don't forget about Kyron Watson or Joe Dineen in these spots.

CB – Matthew Boateng – Thrown to the wolves as a true freshman, Boateng showed some good things early and should be ready for a bigger role.

CB – Michael Mathis – Ronnie Davis, Colin Spencer and a couple other guys could be options here, as well, but I've heard nothing but good things about Mathis and his spring semester arrival should make him ready to go by September.

FS – Isaiah Johnson – Back for a third season, he will be counted on to be more like the 2013 Johnson than the 2014 Johnson.

SS – Fish Smithson – Solid, physical player should step right in for Cassius Sendish.

NB – Tevin Shaw – Shared time here with Greg Allen (a possible candidate to move to cornerback) and showed good toughness and improved coverage skills.

Kansas linebacker Courtney Arnick dives to wrap up Texas Tech receiver Reginald Davis during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas safety Isaiah Johnson.

Kansas linebacker Courtney Arnick dives to wrap up Texas Tech receiver Reginald Davis during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas safety Isaiah Johnson. by Nick Krug

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Introducing new KU football coach David “What you see is what you get” Beaty

Kansas University's new head football coach, David Beaty, speaks at an introductory press conference Monday, Dec. 8, 2014, at the Anderson Family Football Complex. Beaty, the wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator at Texas A&M, was hired by KU Friday.

Kansas University's new head football coach, David Beaty, speaks at an introductory press conference Monday, Dec. 8, 2014, at the Anderson Family Football Complex. Beaty, the wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator at Texas A&M, was hired by KU Friday.

It can be tough to condense 45 minutes of emotion, one-liners, laughs and handshakes into a few words, but newly named KU football coach David Beaty made it easy.

Before we go on, let me remind you that there is no way of knowing how Beaty's time at Kansas will turn out. Will he be the guy who turns the program around? Perhaps. Does he have the skills to make the leap from college assist to head coach? We'll soon find out. Can he attract the right people — both coaches and players — to bring change to a program in desperate need of a new direction? We will not know the answer to that until we see what happens on Saturdays next fall.

But what we do know — and this we learned in a mere four days since hearing that Beaty would be KU's next coach — is that the new KU coach is an honest man who prefers hard work above all else and would rather show you and prove to you that things are different than stand up in front of you and talk about it.

That much was obvious from his introductory news conference Monday morning, as Beaty talked about all of the things that led him to this point — both in football and in life — and emphasized all of the places he wants this program to go in the future.

He made no promises about results or wins or statistics or milestones. Instead, he focused only on the things he could control — work ethic, operating the right way, recruiting quality athletes, bringing in hungry coaches.

It was enough to impress just about anyone at any school, but, so often, that's what these press conferences are about. We've seen it plenty of times before around here, but rarely with the sincerity behind what Beaty showed on Monday.

What you saw on Monday morning was the real David Beaty, warts and all. He said Texas a couple of times when he meant to say Kansas. (And later cringed over it when his wife, Raynee, pointed it out). He offered his “condolences” to the search committee for having selected him — something that could have been taken as an intentional, dead-panned joke or an accidental slip — and he repeated words a few times throughout his news conference. In short, he delivered a genuine look at who he is and how he operates. And, at least from where I sat, I found the mishaps and hiccups refreshing.

You've heard the phrase “winning the press conference” uttered time and time again. And, although there is some skill involved in doing that, it really isn't that tough to do. Prepare a well-thought-out speech. Deliver it with confidence. Appeal to all of the aspects of your new school that get the fans fired up. Repeat as needed.

Winning what comes after the press conference — quarters, halves, games and championships — is what Beaty seems more interested in, and yet he made no promises in that area either.

Instead, he said he would do everything in his power to send next year's senior class out with a special season. He did not say anything about a bowl victory. He did not talk about winning the Big 12. He only said he would commit all he had to that group of seniors and inspire the rest of the team to follow his lead. Whatever that brings, it brings.

That's the best part about KU's new head football coach. He does not appear to be a guy who is interested in trying to be somebody or something he's not. After the press conference, I asked Beaty to recall the toughest question thrown his way during the interview process. His answer only emphasized the kind of guy we're dealing with and the kind of person he seems to be.

“One of the toughest questions for me, because I don't look at it this way and this is where I have a hard time; my vision is so focused on the positive that I just don't look at negatives. I won't allow myself. The hardest question was, 'What do you see as the challenges?' And, the thing is, every day, for some people, is a challenge. And then for others, and this is gonna sound cliché, but, for others, every day is an opportunity. And that's how it is for me. I do a front hand-spring out of bed every day.”

“Some of those things sound crazy,” he continued. “But they roll off my tongue because that's who we are.”

Whether Beaty wins or winds up being the right guy for Kansas is up for debate and will not be determined for some time. But he's got the right mindset to get the job done. And, for the first time in half a dozen years, it matches the mindset that led KU to the 2008 Orange Bowl.

With that established, it's now time to see what he can do.

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The Day After: Chomping the Gators

Kansas players Jamari Traylor, left, Devonte Graham, Wayne Selden and Perry Ellis surround Frank Mason before a pair of free throws by Mason during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas players Jamari Traylor, left, Devonte Graham, Wayne Selden and Perry Ellis surround Frank Mason before a pair of free throws by Mason during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

KU fans joked across Twitter that newly named football coach David Beaty deserved at least some of the credit for inspiring the Jayhawks' comeback victory over Florida at Allen Fieldhouse on Friday night, and why not?

Until Beaty took the floor at halftime to say hello to the KU fan base, the Jayhawks (6-1) looked pretty awful in falling flat and behind by 15 to the Gators as the teams entered the locker room at halftime.

Of course, there's no doubting that Bill Self and what he said to the KU players during the break had more than a little to do with the Jayhawks' roaring comeback, but most of Friday belonged to Beaty and if KU fans are half as kind to the new coach when football season rolls around, the program might actually be headed somewhere positive.

Until then, there's a whole lot of basketball left to be played and if the Jayhawks more often look like the team they were in the second half and less like the team that sputtered up and down the floor in the first, there figure to be some great days ahead in the immediate future.

Newly-hired Kansas head football coach David Beaty is introduced to the Allen Fieldhouse crowd during halftime of the JayhawksÕ game against Floriday on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014. Beaty is the 38th head coach in the programÕs history.

Newly-hired Kansas head football coach David Beaty is introduced to the Allen Fieldhouse crowd during halftime of the JayhawksÕ game against Floriday on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014. Beaty is the 38th head coach in the programÕs history. by Nick Krug

Quick takeaway

Coming off of a pretty solid showing in the Orlando Classic, I wondered how the Jayhawks would respond against a tough Florida team and an even tougher coach in Billy Donovan. Initially, things looked good and the Jayhawks stormed out of the gates and to an early lead. But Florida kept fight, kept its composure and then put a heck of a scare into Kansas. It might not have been much fun for KU fans while it was going down, but that might go down as one of the best things to happen to this team. They played well in Orlando and looked good doing it. That wasn't the case for the full 40 minutes on Friday, but these guys now know they can fight back and pull themselves out of trouble. Being down by 18 at home early in the second half probably qualifies as a little more than “trouble,” and you can bet that Self and the veterans on this club will make sure every player on the roster remembers exactly how that felt so they won't find such

Three reasons to smile

1 – Wayne Selden got back on track in a big way and did it with what Self called “real points.” Selden looked to be in as much of a zone as I remember seeing him in since he lit up Oklahoma in Norman last season and he scored from inside and outside with the look of a guy who knew success was coming. It was only a matter of time for Selden to get going again and now that he has, maybe he'll be able to play with an ever clearer head the rest of the season. One thing to note about Selden's big scoring night, though: He finished with zero rebounds, one assists, one block and zero steals. At least when he wasn't shooting it well, he was still contributing in other areas. And I thought it was interesting that his game against the Gators was almost all about scoring. Something to keep an eye on.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) is defended by Florida forward Jacob Kurtz (30) during the first on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) is defended by Florida forward Jacob Kurtz (30) during the first on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

2 – What can you say about the fight the Jayhawks showed in the second half? They were intense, hungry, passionate and, well, just better. The players fed off of each other's energy and seemed to really ramp it up after each made bucket or each forced turnover. The fans were fantastic in doing their part to help the cause and the whole thing was pretty impressive to watch.

Kansas guards Devonte Graham and Wayne Selden celebrate a forced turnover against the Gators before Florida forward Jacob Kurtz (30) during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guards Devonte Graham and Wayne Selden celebrate a forced turnover against the Gators before Florida forward Jacob Kurtz (30) during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

3 – KU's free throw shooting was fantastic. And the way Florida closed the game, the Jayhawks needed every one of them. Four guys missed just one or no free throws, led by Cliff Alexander's 8-of-8 showing and Devonte' Graham's 9-of-10 clip. Not bad for a couple of freshmen in clutch moments.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – On a night when the building was as fired up as it had been all season and a day when KU named a new football coach, the Jayhawks struggled to match that intensity in the first half. After a decent start, they shut it down and looked slow, sluggish and disinterested, which probably had a little something to do with the way Florida was taking it to them. KU responded with incredible energy in the second half — and the Fieldhouse faithful continued to urge the Jayhawks on — so the first-half funk is not reason to panic.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) looks to dump a pass as he bowls over Florida guard Michael Frazier II (20) during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) looks to dump a pass as he bowls over Florida guard Michael Frazier II (20) during the second half on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

2 – KU coughed it up nine times in the first half and almost all of them were simply careless mistakes. The Jayhawks telegraphed passes, were lazy with the basketball and, perhaps worst of all, seemed to really try to press after making a mistake. They cleaned it up considerably in the second half, but their first-half issues were a good reminder that this is still a young team learning how to play for Self and how to play together.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) tries to get around Florida forward Chris Walker (23) during the first on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) tries to get around Florida forward Chris Walker (23) during the first on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

3 – I hate to keep picking on the guy, but somewhere along the line, Jamari Traylor lost his confidence and that is really affecting his play. Against Floriday, Traylor missed two easy shots, committed two pretty bad turnovers and played his second lowest number of minutes (15) this season. It's not just that Traylor has lost confidence that's a concern. It's the fact that (a) he's still too important to this team to sit completely and (b) you can really see that every little mistake he makes bugs the heck out of him and that seems to add to the problem.

One for the road

KU's spirited come-from-behind win over the Gators...

• Made Kansas 6-1 or better for the third-straight season and 10th time in Bill Self's 12 seasons at KU.

• Gave Kansas a 1-1 record in the SEC/Big 12 Challenge with both games against Florida.

• Made Kansas 4-2 all-time versus Florida.

• Made Kansas 3-0 in Allen Fieldhouse this season, 178-9 in AFH under Self and 717-109 all-time in the venue.

• Improved Self to 331-70 while at Kansas, 538-175 overall and 2-1 all-time against Florida.

• Made KU 2,132-823 all-time.

Next up

The Jayhawks continue their stretch of tough games, when they travel to Georgetown on Wednesday for a 6 p.m. tipoff with the Hoyas. The game will be shown on FOX Sports 1.

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Florida, 71-65

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Florida, 71-65

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Coaching Search 2014: David Beaty an attractive hire in many ways

Kansas University receivers coach David Beaty, right, congratulates Todd Reesing on a play in this file photo from last season. Beaty has established himself as one of the top recruiters in the Big 12 Conference.

Kansas University receivers coach David Beaty, right, congratulates Todd Reesing on a play in this file photo from last season. Beaty has established himself as one of the top recruiters in the Big 12 Conference.

When I woke up this morning, I figured it would be just another normal day on the Kansas University coaching search trail. The hire seemed to be at least a few days away and my objective was to call some more sources and find out what people were hearing and/or talking about.

I should've known my day would be a little different when I woke up to a carton of ice cream in the sink and a note from my wife that said, “You put the ice cream back in the fridge last night.”

Such is life on the coaching search trail.

As I mentioned on Tuesday in my daily coaching search blog, Texas A&M assistant coach David Beaty was the name I produced most often when asked back in September and October who I thought would be the next head coach of the KU football program.

The reasons are plenty and have been well documented both on this site and throughout the Internet. Beaty has a great reputation as a top-notch recruiter and his ties to the Texas high school scene are as impressive as just about anyone's.

That should help him not only upgrade the talent at Kansas but also could aid him as he tries to put together a coaching staff up to the challenge of turning KU around.

As we moved through the process and learned about the criteria that would determine which candidates had a real shot and which didn't, it seemed like Beaty was an obvious name to keep at or near the top of the list.

He's been at Kansas in both good and bad times, so he knows the lay of the land and, like former KU interim coach Clint Bowen, has seen what works and what does not. I think that's huge and will allow Beaty to move forward quickly without having to waste much time getting that figured out. It's a process than can take as much as a year or two for most coaches and, although there will still be things Beaty sees for the first time — especially considering this is his first time holding down such a big-time position — his ability to lean on past experiences should help make any growing pains very minimal.

Beaty's was a name that checked several of the right boxes long before the end of the season arrived and the search ever officially began. There's no doubt that Beaty was on the KU radar from the moment Charlie Weis was fired and he most likely never left his perch of strong contender.

Several people I spoke with today said Beaty was very impressive during his phone interview this week. He must have been for the in-person interviews to go up in smoke, and I would think that's a good sign for the strength of this hire. Rather than merely impressing one guy, Beaty impressed an entire committee. One source told me there was not a single person on the committee who doubted Beaty after hearing his plan for how to lead the KU football program.

As I outlined this morning, that plan likely included detailed plans about his coaching staff, recruiting — both in Texas and Kansas — general offensive and defensive philosophies and ways to close the gap between KU and the rest of the Big 12 Conference.

It's a tall task for anyone to undertake and, for no other reason than that, you have to tip your cap to Beaty, 44, for being willing to take it. Sure, it's a promotion. Sure, it's a raise. But it was both of those things for Turner Gill, Charlie Weis and Terry Allen and things did not wind up working out too well for those three.

Overall, though, I like the hire. I think Beaty has a chance to put together a great staff and I think his energy, age and enthusiasm will be big assets for KU in this latest rebuilding project. If what I'm hearing about Beaty's salary range is accurate — base around $800,000 with incentives added on to that — I like the hire even more because it will (a) leave KU with more money to help him hire a killer staff and (b) keep him hungry.

Who cares what other schools pay or what other coaches make? This isn't a popularity contest. A lot of places it is. But Kansas cannot afford to have that mentality. It needs guys who can coach football and recruit talent and it should pay them what they're worth not what they want the job to be.

David Beaty is a well-respected guy — even if he's not a big name — and I don't think he'll have any trouble gaining the respect of the players, the KU athletic department and, ultimately, the fan base. The reason? He's a likable dude and it will not take people long to see that.

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Coaching Search 2014: David Beaty emerges as leading candidate; hire could come soon

10:48 a.m. Update:

It looks like the timeline for the the KU coaching hire has moved up drastically and, according to multiple sources, an announcement could come as soon as this afternoon.

It looks as if Texas A&M recruiting coordinator and wide receivers coach David Beaty has emerged as the clear leader for the job and may be named the 38th coach in KU history as soon as this afternoon.

According to a source, the KU assistant coaches were asked to leave the football complex today because someone of some importance was coming through later. According to online flight tracking, there is a plane en route to Lawrence from College Station, Texas.

Beaty was believed to be a strong candidate throughout the process, with his recruiting ties in Texas and past experience at KU giving him two important qualities for the job based on what KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger outlined as key factors before the search fully began.

Beaty, 43, worked on the staff of Mark Mangino at Kansas from 2008-09 and for one year under Turner Gill in 2011.

According to USA Today, he made $359,500 at A&M in 2013. He is expected to make at least twice as much as that plus incentives at KU.

Stay tuned for more updates as this story develops.

Original post, 9:39 a.m.:

It's Friday, and we've now had a full week of coaching search speculation and banter while Kansas University athletic director Sheahon Zenger has had a full week to conduct phone interviews and narrow down his list of candidates to replace Charlie Weis.

From what I've been able to gather, it sounds like this thing is close to wrapping up but that does not necessarily mean there's a clear No. 1 or No. 2 choice, just that they've done a fair amount of narrowing down candidates and are in position to conduct final interviews and use those to make their decision.

I think it's safe to say that between 7-12 coaches (perhaps one or two more) went through phone interviews with Zenger and members of the search committee this week — a couple are probably still doing that today — and I'm guessing that four or five of those will get an in-person interview, which could begin as soon as Sunday night but most likely will take place Monday and Tuesday.

There appears to be the sense that this thing could wrap up even before next Friday, but that, of course, depends upon how the in-person interviews go and assumes that no other new candidates join the party. It's hard to know whether that will happen, but it certainly could. As I was told from the beginning, the search committee would not be opposed to 11th-hour interest, provided it came from the right candidate.

It seems Clint Bowen, David Beaty, Tim Beck and Ed Warinner will get interviews. That has been reflected in the percentage wheel throughout this process. I still think there could be another serious contender or two involved here, but I've had a hard time pinpointing who that might be. If that's the case, it's most likely a sitting head coach, but my money would be on it being a name we might not have heard much, if at all, during the past week. In short, I don't think it's Willie Fritz, Bo Pelini, Jerry Kill or any of those other names you've all heard throughout this process.

I'm still working the phones to try to see if any of my sources have heard any other names pop up, so stay tuned throughout the day for updates, if available.

While we wait, let's look at a few of the factors that I think will be crucial during the interview process and probably already were during the round of phone interviews. Generally speaking, the second interview becomes an extended version of what already took place over the phone. I heard the phone interviews were around an hour, but you can bet the in-person interviews will be three times that long, if not longer.

• One thing I think the committee will really want to hear is who each candidate believes it can bring in as part of its coaching staff. This, obviously, is not a guarantee, but it's pretty common for guys who have head coaching aspirations to have an idea of who they'd like to have on their staff and many of them have even had conversations with these guys in the past. Something like, 'Hey, if I were to get this job or that job would you come with me as my OC?' They don't have to have signed contracts at the ready during the interviews, but I think one of the advantages of having a committee here is that you get several different opinions and reads on how confident a candidate is in the staff he could put together based on how he tells you who it might be.

• Another huge aspect is each coach's recruiting plan. This goes beyond just saying, “We'd hit Texas pretty hard” and stuff like that, and includes information on the types of kids and players they'd go after along with the crucial territories and any plans for how to make recruiting Kansas a priority and how to handle walk-ons.

• The committee also is going to want to hear about general football philosophies. For example, if a guy comes in and talks about running a pro style offense, he probably won't be seen in the most favorable light. But this step goes beyond just talking about offensive and defensive schemes. The committee also will want to hear how each candidate plans and expects to compete as a heavy underdog in a tough conference and how they would plan to narrow the gap between KU and the rest of the Big 12.

• Another important element of the interview could be to provide a detailed plan for how practices would be run. Again, the candidates probably won't have to go as far as drawing up a complete daily practice schedule — though that probably wouldn't hurt and a couple of guys probably will — but the committee surely will want to hear how practices will be run, what the tone of practices will be like and those on the committee familiar with how things ran under Turner Gill and Weis surely will compare what they hear in interviews to what they saw during the past four or five seasons. Clearly, what's been done in the recent past hasn't worked.

Don't get me wrong, I think the interviews will be very important because they'll allow the committee to get a real, live feel for the confidence, comfort-level and charisma of each candidate. But I don't think this is a deal where a guy can win the job simply by hitting a home run in the interview.

If this committee has done its job, which it seems is the case, then its members have talked to all kinds of people about each one of the candidates and done extensive background checks on each of them, involving everything from football to family to philosophy.

I think that may be why this search has gone at the pace that it has. After back-to-back swings and misses with the past two head coaches, they cannot take anything for granted this time around. And that has way more to do with the overall good of the program and the university than it does just for Zenger and his future.

Having said all of that, my latest percentage wheel has not changed much at all from yesterday morning. I know people expect Warinner to move up on my list, but, even with him coming in for an interview, I'm leaving him where he's been all along for now based on what I've been hearing.

If there's an 11th-hour candidate, that will certainly change things, but, as of now, it seems like Bowen and Beaty are the front-runners and pretty close at the top. It could come down to the interviews and whether Beaty gets an offer. If he does, I think he takes it. If not, I think it's Bowen.

Here's a look:

1. Clint Bowen 34%
1. David Beaty 34%
3. Other 22%
4. Ed Warinner 5%
5. Tim Beck 5%

Stay logged on to KUsports.com throughout the day for any news or updates that may come our way…

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Coaching Search 2014: Another hypothetical example of the trickle-down effect

1:44 p.m. update:

There was a Tweet out there — isn't there always? — that said that the KU job had been offered to Ohio State assistant coach Ed Warinner.

I talked to plenty of sources today, both before and after the Tweet, who said no offer has been made and that KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger and the search committee were still in the process of trimming down their list and identifying the finalists.

Warinner may very well be in that group and there have been reports that said he was one of the guys who participated in the phone interview with members of the committee this week, but reports of an offer having been made to anybody are definitely premature.

I've been told from the very beginning that Warinner would likely get a chance to interview. That has not changed and he may well be one of the final few guys who gets a face-to-face interview with Zenger and company next week. Time will tell.

Stay tuned for the latest from the search, which is starting to catch some heat given how quickly Florida and Nebraska filled their openings. None of that should matter to KU, though, other than in the obvious way that the openings at Colorado State and Oregon State could impact what KU's doing.

Original post: 9:30 a.m.

It's a little early for an update but I was able to get on the phones a little quicker today and found out a few interesting tidbits that might impact the KU coaching search.

The first has to do with Texas A&M offensive coordinator Jake Spavital, who, according to a report from the Houston Chronicle recently interviewed for the head coach opening at Tulsa, which is his hometown.

The news of Spavital's interview was first reported by KRIV-TV and confirmed by the Tulsa World.

According to a couple of people I've talked with, it sounds very likely that Spavital will get that Tulsa job, which, obviously, would leave open the OC job at A&M. That's where things get interesting for Kansas and for two very different reasons.

  1. If Spavital leaves, one could make a case for Beaty being the obvious choice to replace him as the Aggies OC and that could come with a significant raise and be enticing enough to make him pull his name from contention for the KU job.

  2. On the opposite end of the spectrum, if Spavital leaves and A&M coach Kevin Sumlin chooses to put someone other than Beaty into the OC job, it would open up some questions as to why Beaty was passed over a second time for that OC job. When talking about Beaty as an option for the KU job, many have said it would be hard enough to envision KU hiring someone who's not even a current coordinator, but wouldn't the hire be even more difficult to sell with a guy who keeps getting passed up?

It's things like this that make the whole timeline of this hire very critical. The more these other moves happen around KU, the more possible it is that they impact the KU job. That's not to say each instance has a direct effect on what KU is actually doing, but, in the coaching world — especially as far as the fans and media are involved — perception is almost as important as reality.

And it's things like this that leave me believing Clint Bowen still has a very good shot of getting this job.

Here's a look:

1. Clint Bowen – 38%
2. David Beaty – 30%
3. Other – 23%
4. Ed Warinner — 5%
5. Tim Beck — 4%

Stay logged on to KUsports.com for more updates throughout the day.

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Coaching Search 2014: Could elite openings elsewhere be a factor?

Kansas interim head football coach Clint Bowen looks out over the stadium as the rain comes down prior to kickoff against Oklahoma on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014 at Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma.

Kansas interim head football coach Clint Bowen looks out over the stadium as the rain comes down prior to kickoff against Oklahoma on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014 at Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma. by Nick Krug

When covering a coaching search, it's important to keep in mind the entire college football landscape because what happens one place with one opening can impact what happens at another in a hurry.

That's certainly true at Kansas University and has been during each of the past two searches the Jayhawks had for a head football coach.

I've spent parts of the past couple of days looking back at our coverage of the search in 2011 and it brought back some serious memories, a couple of headaches and a few laughs.

One of the things that stood out the most, though, were the jobs that were open last time and how, at the time, it seemed like some pretty big-time gigs.

Texas A&M, UCLA, Mississippi, Arizona State, Washington State, North Carolina and Illinois all had openings at the time Kansas did, and all of them looked to be pretty heavy hitters with whom KU had to compete. The funny thing about that list is it pales in comparison to the jobs that are open this time around.

Florida, Michigan and Nebraska all are looking for head football coaches right now, and, as if those three don't carry enough weight on their own, a few smaller schools, which might actually be trying to pick from the same candidate pool as Kansas (like it or not) also have openings. These include Tulsa, UNLV, Montana and SMU, which already has filled its opening with Clemson assistant Chad Morris.

Although there was more crossover between candidates at Kansas and other schools the last time around, it seems like jumping on their guy a little faster this time around might be a good move for the Jayhawks. When the dominoes start to fall with the big three, the trickle-down effect could impact KU's search in a big way and create unnecessary headaches for Sheahon Zenger and company.

The good news for KU here is that the top names that appear to be in the hunt for the Kansas job do not appear to be options for the big three. If they were, Kansas would be in trouble and likely would have to look elsewhere anyway.

The reason for KU to try to get its deal done before those schools do is because of the potential fallout from a hire by the big dogs. Let's say Michigan hired Brett Bielema away from Arkansas. (Yes, Bielema was in Lawrence on Wednesday but only to visit with and extend an offer to Lawrence High football standout Amani Bledsoe).

Bielema's departure would leave an opening at Arkansas, which could be filled by someone like Justin Fuente, of Memphis. Even though it seems like Fuente is pretty much out of the mix for the KU job, his departure would leave the Memphis job open and that could be appealing to any number of candidates involved with Kansas.

It's a bit of a paranoid way to look at things, but wouldn't that just be KU's luck to finally identify a guy they feel is a good option only to see him plucked away by someone else for more money or a better chance to win right away?

Last time around, when Tom Keegan and I were ranking the job openings from most appealing to least, it was tough to put KU anywhere other than the bottom. This time around, even though those three big-boy jobs are in a different stratosphere, the Kansas opening at least appears to be a middle-of-the-pack gig relative to what's available.

Anyway, it doesn't seem like timing will be an issue here. I still think this thing wraps up mid-to-late next week. And I still think the names who were on my percentage wheel last night are the most likely names KU will go with.

I made a few more calls today and got a little more input on the situation. Nothing earth-shattering, but enough to move the needle a little bit. The order of today's percentage wheel has not changed much, but the values have.

Here's a look:

1. David Beaty – 35%
2. Clint Bowen – 31%
3. Other – 20%
4. Tim Beck — 9%
5. Ed Warinner — 5%

______

• As you can see, the gap between Bowen and Beaty has narrowed a little bit (at least in my mind) and I think Bowen is still very much alive in this thing. This may seem obvious, but it really could all come down to how Bowen handles the formal interview, whenever that takes place. Sometime early next week seems likely. It's obvious that Bowen has some pretty good support among KU folks and Zenger has seen what he can do with the team, in the locker room and on the sideline. So those things are all known already. What is not completely known by Zenger and the search committee is the breadth and quality of Bowen's vision for how to rebuild KU — although I do know they've had general talks about this topic during the past few months. Answers to questions about his staff, his recruiting plans and things of that nature could be crucial and Bowen may have to be nearly perfect in there to get his shot. If he is and if he's able to really impress Zenger, it could still be him.

• I went ahead and took Fuente off of the wheel completely because I had heard that whatever interest there may have been between Fuente and Kansas had cooled during the past couple of days and he's working on a new deal at Memphis. Here's what Memphis AD Tom Bowen (no relation) said in a recent statement:

“Our administration has been working proactively with Coach Fuente and his representatives on a new contract for several weeks. He has been very engaged and deeply appreciative throughout the process. We are very close to finalizing an agreement and look forward to making a formal announcement at an appropriate time. (We) are extremely excited about continuing to build the Memphis Football program under Fuente’s leadership."

Fuente also commented on the rumors surrounding his candidacy for various jobs during an interview on The Geoff Calkins Show earlier this week:

“Making absurd, definitive statements, in my opinion, is not the smart way to go,” Fuente said. “If something where there’s mutual interest comes along, then I’ll visit with them and we’ll think about it, measure everything out and make a calculated decision. But the thing I would say is I have a lot of sweat equity invested in this program. I have a lot of pride in what we’ve done. We have a fantastic coaching staff. I think we have a great support system to truly build a football program. So it’d have to be something pretty special for me to even look at it.”

• One thing someone pointed out to me that could be relevant if KU were to hire Beaty is that, although his recruiting ties in Texas would be huge, he would not actually be the guy able to recruit the state as much as his assistants because of the rules for how much head coaches can be on the road. Sure, he would be able to get out there and talk to kids and parents, but I don't think he'd be able to put in the same number of hours and visits as his assistants. Head coaches are allowed just one in-school visit with prospects and college programs are allowed a maximum of six in-person, off-campus visits with each prospect from Dec. 1 to Feb. 1, with the month-long dead period basically running during winter break. Such factors would make the staff Beaty brings to KU even more key. Something to consider with that is how well those guys — whoever they are — would know and/or be able to sell Kansas compared to Bowen and the staff he might put together. That's clearly not a make or break either way, just something I hadn't really thought of.

• More tomorrow as we do our best to stay on top of the situation and reach out to as many sources as we can to try to gain some insight into what direction KU might go with this hire.

Stay tuned….

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Is the Big 12 really rooting for Missouri football this weekend? You bet.

All right, so the Kansas University football season is officially over and all of the attention around here seems to be on the coaching search that is heating up by the minute and figures to take a few wild twists and turns in the next 10 days or so.

But just because the Jayhawks are done playing football does not mean college football is over. Far from it, in fact. Even for the most die-hard KU fans.

After all, with this being championship weekend and so many different games having all kinds of playoff implications, it might be fun to sit back and watch a little football without having a dog in the fight.

The biggest game on the Big 12 radar, without question, is Kansas State at Baylor. The winner guarantees itself at least a share of the Big 12 title and could, with a TCU loss to Iowa State — however shocking that would be — win the title outright.

For Baylor, the game looms large because a strong victory over K-State could be the statement win the Bears need to convince the college football playoff committee that they should be included in college football's first ever final four instead of TCU, which has maintained a slight lead over BU in the standings despite having lost to Baylor earlier this season for the Horned Frogs' only loss.

That's as much at the center of the national conversation regarding college football as any other game this week and is a big reason that ESPN chose to go to Waco, Texas, for Gameday instead of going to one of the true championship games in the ACC (Georgia Tech vs. Florida State), Big Ten (Ohio State vs. Wisconsin), Pac-12 (Oregon vs. Arizona) or SEC (Alabama vs. Missouri).

Is there a way that both TCU and Baylor could get into that final four? Sure. It might be a bit of a long shot, but it would be one of the most incredible scenarios for the Big 12 Conference. Here's why:

Oregon (10-1) and Florida State (11-0) seem to be in pretty good shape and will both be in without question if they win their title tilts. Let's say that were to happen. The only way that Baylor and TCU then would both be able to get in would be for Alabama (10-1) to lose. And who would Alabama have to lose to? Yep, former Big 12 member Missouri, which sits at 9-2 entering the SEC title game.

Go figure. All of a sudden, after a couple of years of not worrying a lick about them, the Big 12 is suddenly rooting like mad for Missouri again. As much as it seems like that might sting the Big 12, it actually stands to hurt the Tigers more. See, if Missouri wins, that could conceivably keep the mighty SEC out of the playoff picture altogether, which not only would eliminate the conference's title hopes but also would cost each member of the SEC some money.

In that scenario, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi State and Missouri all would have two losses. Auburn and Ole Miss already each have three. Sure, the Tigers would be the champs of the SEC, but would the committee really put a two-loss Missouri team — with home losses to Indiana and Georgia, no less — in the final four ahead of a host of one-loss teams? Never say never, but the smart money is on no way.

With a win over Wisconsin, Ohio State could crash the party, but, with TCU already in and Baylor picking up momentum from a victory over a Top 10 opponent, the two Big 12 teams could stay ahead of the Buckeyes.

So there ya go. Plenty of reason to pay attention to college football this weekend, even though the Jayhawks are done playing.

I know how most of you KU fans work and I know it's tough to ask you to root for Missouri in anything. But if you're pro-Big 12 and would like to see two of the nine teams that beat Kansas stay alive for the national title — not to mention see a little more cash come to the KU athletic department — you'll do just that and do it with joy of knowing that even a Mizzou victory would actually wind up hurting the Tigers in the long run.

Good luck with your decision and enjoy what promises to be a great weekend of college football.

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Coaching Search 2014: There’s a new No. 1 on the updated percentage wheel

Kansas University wide receivers coach David Beaty, right, delivers instructions to KU wideout D.J. Beshears on April 18 at the KU practice field. Beaty rejoined the Jayhawks’ staff after serving as offensive coordinator at Rice last season.

Kansas University wide receivers coach David Beaty, right, delivers instructions to KU wideout D.J. Beshears on April 18 at the KU practice field. Beaty rejoined the Jayhawks’ staff after serving as offensive coordinator at Rice last season. by Kevin Anderson

When Charlie Weis was fired on Sept. 28 and this whole Kansas University football coaching search first got rolling — the third such endeavor by KU since 2009 — there was one name that I always used to answer the question, “So who's gonna be the next coach?”

It might be time to put that name back at the top of the list.

Based on what I learned from a handful of conversations I had throughout the day Tuesday, I'm elevating Texas A&M assistant coach David Beaty to the No. 1 spot in my percentage wheel.

Here's a look:

1. David Beaty – 37%
2. Clint Bowen – 25%
3. Other – 16%
4. Justin Fuente – 10%
5. Tim Beck – 7%
6. Ed Warinner – 5%

As you already know — and many of you have so kindly pointed out — this does not mean Beaty is absolutely the guy or even in the lead or anything like that. The percentage wheel merely keeps tabs on what I think might happen and it's sounding a little more likely by the day that Beaty could be the guy the Jayhawks wind up with as the 38th head coach in program history.

If that's the case, the Jayhawks certainly would be making a solid hire.

I knew Beaty briefly during both of his stints as the KU wide receivers coach — once under Mark Mangino (2008-09) and again in 2011 under Turner Gill — and I liked everything about the guy.

He's a good guy. He's genuine. There's not an ounce of phoniness to him and he has incredible people skills, with the ability to relate to people from all walks of life, from a 16-year-old three-star recruit to a 72-year-old millionaire donor and everyone in between. He's one of those guys who seems to call everyone “partner” and finds a way to make them like it when he does. Some might even say he's the Texas version of Bill Self, personality-wise at least.

His recruiting ties throughout Texas are already well documented — he's a native of Garland, Texas and worked at four different Texas high schools from 1994-2005 — but it's probably worth noting that he has the deepest ties in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, which has been a hotbed for Kansas during the past decade and definitely will continue to be so into the future.

Beaty owns a highly intense personality, one that's rooted in down-home goodness and having fun. That's not to say he's a pushover. Not by any means. In fact, his receivers at Kansas always talked about how demanding he was and that he emphasized that they do all of the little things right — particularly with regard to blocking — and often did not accept anything less than perfection. At the same time, he respected them enough to make them feel appreciated and knew how to reward their solid efforts.

A lot has been made about Beaty being “the next Art Briles,” but that's a lot of pressure to put on one guy given the fact that many believe Briles is as good as they come in the college football coaching profession these days. The reason that probably comes up so often is because Beaty was a successful high school coach in Texas and followed that success to the college ranks, where he's done well both as a position coach and a recruiter.

One former Big 12 assistant I spoke to about Beaty said he believed without hesitation that Beaty was ready to make the leap to the head coach's office and added that if that's who the Jayhawks end up hiring they will have made a very quality hire.

In 2010, Beaty was the offensive coordinator at Rice and he held the co-offensive coordinator title during his second stint at Kansas under Gill while coaching wide receivers at both schools. He's been the A&M receivers coach for three years and is in his second season as A&M's recruiting coordinator.

It's possible there was some hope early on that KU might be able to convince Beaty to come to Lawrence as the offensive coordinator, but I'm betting A&M would step up and battle to keep him if that were the only offer on the table. If KU offers him the head coaching job, there's probably not much Kevin Sumlin could do to make A&M sound more appealing than that.

Former Kansas receivers coach David Beaty, right, will return to the KU coaching staff in 2011.

Former Kansas receivers coach David Beaty, right, will return to the KU coaching staff in 2011.

• As you can see, I've also added former Nebraska offensive coordinator Tim Beck to the percentage wheel after being told not to sleep on the guy during this search and removed Matt Wells from the list.

• As for the one removal, I didn't hear much, good or bad, when asking around about Wells on Tuesday and I also noticed that Jon Kirby over at JayhawkSlant.com was planning to remove him from his board.

• I don't think Clint Bowen is done at this point. That's why he's still in the No. 2 spot on the percentage wheel. But his best shot right now seems to be if one or two other guys pass or remove themselves from contention. Let's say Beaty elects to stay at A&M (perhaps with a raise and a new title) and Fuente waits for a better job to come open to make his leap. If that were to happen, I think Bowen would be the guy.

• There's always the chance that someone new could enter the picture and that's why I've got "Other" up there so high still. All of that 11th hour talk that I heard on Sunday was pretty interesting.

• It's still early, but this thing seems to be moving pretty quickly. That makes sense because of all of that prep time Sheahon Zenger, Chuck Neinas and company had as the season played out and, it also makes sense because KU would be smart to move as fast as possible given the fact that big-time jobs Florida, Michigan and Nebraska are all open at the same time and what goes on there and the trickle-down effect that would follow could impact Kansas if they wait around too long.

Stay tuned…

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The Day After: Three victories in four days for KU hoops

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) pumps his fist after a bucket and a Michigan State foul during the first half on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) pumps his fist after a bucket and a Michigan State foul during the first half on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

The Kansas Unviersity men's basketball team picked up some Orlando Classic hardware over the holiday weekend, with three victories in three days over Rhode Island, Tennessee and No. 20 Michigan State.

More important than anything that will end up in KU's trophy case, however, was the chance for the Jayhawks to play big-time minutes together in a short period of time, which allowed the players to bond, the coaches to feel out what they've got and the product as a whole to look a lot different — and better — than it did in the week that led up to the early-season tournament.

Kansas was sharp in many different ways during its three victories, with different players stepping up at different times and different aspects of the Jayhawks' style coming through at the exact right times. Perhaps more important than any of that was the fact that the tournament title came with victories over three pretty good teams. That experience and the confidence that comes from it, no doubt will do wonders for this team as it continues to grow and come together.

Quick takeaway

Don't get me wrong, winning three games in four days against good competition is no easy feat, but, the way I see it, the best thing for the KU men's basketball program is that the victories came without the Jayhawks playing their best basketball. They were plenty good, of course. And a couple of individuals — namely Perry Ellis, Frank Mason and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk — delivered pretty solid performances day in and day out, but, for the most part, the Jayhawks still showed some room to improve in plenty of areas. Most notable among them were KU's transition offense, freshmen still trying to find their way. It's early, so that's to be expected. But if/when the Jayhawks start to put those things together and stack them upon their already solid foundation, this team has a chance to be scary good.

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and forward Perry Ellis look to smother a shot from Tennessee forward Armani Moore (4) during the first half on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and forward Perry Ellis look to smother a shot from Tennessee forward Armani Moore (4) during the first half on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

Three reasons to smile

1 – It may still change, but it sure looks like Bill Self has figured out his starting lineup. Frank Mason, Wayne Selden, Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk, Perry Ellis and Landen Lucas have been pretty solid together to start games and they bring different styles and skills that really complement one another while allowing Self to still leave plenty of firepower on the bench. I've been skeptical of Lucas' role on this team, but if he plays all season like he played in Orlando, his role will be there and it will be important.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) delivers a put-back dunk over Rhode Island forward Jarelle Reischel (2) during the first half on Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) delivers a put-back dunk over Rhode Island forward Jarelle Reischel (2) during the first half on Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

2 – Forget Perry Ellis' actual numbers. They were great. But forget that he averaged 19 points and 9 rebounds in the three wins in Orlando and focus more on how he got them. Ellis was aggressive throughout all three games and he attacked the rim, scored in a variety of ways and operated with an attitude that Self has been looking for for quite some time — the mindset that when the ball comes off the rim on the opponent's end, Ellis should have as much right to the ball as anyone on the floor. That was, by far, the most impressive part of Ellis' MVP performance in Orlando and if he can keep that up and perhaps even improve upon it — and there's no reason to think he won't now that he's done it and seen the reward — Ellis is going to be even more of a nightmare for KU's opponents than people already thought.

Kansas guard Frank Mason pulls away a rebound during the second half against Tennessee on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas guard Frank Mason pulls away a rebound during the second half against Tennessee on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

3 – Plenty was made about Frank Mason's 10 rebounds in the victory over Michigan State, but this was not just a one-game thing. Mason was great on the boards all weekend and, at 5-foot-11, brings something to the floor that very few people expect. KU's starting point guard has ripped down 24 rebounds and ranks as the team's fourth leading rebounding, just one board behind Jamari Traylor. It's easy for guards to want to leak out and get going toward the offensive end when shots go up, but Mason clearly does not think that way. He almost always stays back to crash the defensive glass and the Jayhawks are better because of it.

Three reasons to sigh

1 – It's no secret that freshman Kelly Oubre is still trying to figure things out. It's also no secret that KU is just six games into the season and people should probably let him do just that. Still, Oubre struggled in Orlando and continued to look lost out there at times. He moves as if he's thinking about every step and has not yet allowed himself to play free and loose, which has even created problems for him as an offensive player, which was supposed to be his strength coming into college. Oubre was not the only one who looked a little lost last weekend. Jamari Traylor also had plenty of forgettable moments, most of them coming in the form of those 'Why did he just do that?' or 'Did he really just do that?' plays that cause you to forget how athletic and powerful he is and force you to wonder where his mind is at times?

Tennessee players celebrate  a charge from Kansas forward Jamari Traylor during the second half on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Tennessee players celebrate a charge from Kansas forward Jamari Traylor during the second half on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

2 – When Wayne Selden went scoreless in KU's 27-point win over Rider earlier this season, KU coach Bill Self barely blinked because Selden finished with nine assists, made a conscious effort to get others involved and took just four shots. Still, Self said there probably can't be too many games in the future where the team's starting two guard goes scoreless. Selden was not scoreless against Michigan State — he hit 5 of 6 free throws — but he did miss all 10 shots he attempted and, at this point, that has to be at least minor cause for concern. So far this season, Selden is hitting just 27 percent of his shots (13-of-49) and has struggled to finish in the paint and from distance (he's just 5-of-19 from three-point range). It's not time to panic yet, but it's obvious that coming up empty is bothering Selden and the longer this goes the more it becomes a concern.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets airborne before pinning a layup by Michigan State guard Travis Trice (20) against the backboard for a block during the second half on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets airborne before pinning a layup by Michigan State guard Travis Trice (20) against the backboard for a block during the second half on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

3 – He played through it and claimed to be fine, but the lingering shoulder issues plaguing freshman point guard Devonte' Graham are not exactly great news. Graham played just 27 minutes all weekend and had at least a couple of moments where he got hit or tweaked the shoulder that caused KU fans to hold their breaths. KU has the depth to weather an injury like this, but, more for Graham's sake, you have to wonder just how bad it is and how long it will stick around.

Kansas guard Devonte Graham (4) tosses a pass as he is defended by Rhode Island guard E.C. Matthews (0) and guard Jarvis Garrett (1) during the second half on Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida.

Kansas guard Devonte Graham (4) tosses a pass as he is defended by Rhode Island guard E.C. Matthews (0) and guard Jarvis Garrett (1) during the second half on Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014 at the HP Field House in Kissimmee, Florida. by Nick Krug

One for the road

KU's championship-game victory over Michigan State:

· Made the Jayhawks 5-1 for the third straight season and the 10th time in Bill Self's 12 seasons at Kansas.

· Brought KU to a 45-26 record against ranked teams in the Bill Self era and 1-1 against top-25 squads this season.

· Cut Michigan State’s lead in the all-time series to 6-5 and snapped KU’s three-game losing streak to the Spartans.

· Improved Kansas to 3-1 this season in games played at neutral sites.

· Improved Self to 5-6 against Michigan State, 330-70 at Kansas and 537-175 overall.

· Pushed KU’s in-season tournament record to 35-6 under Self.

· Made KU's all-time record 2,131-823.  

Next up

After a few days off early in the week, the Jayhawks will return to action at home on Friday, when they take on Florida at 8 p.m. Think about this: By Friday night, Self will have squared off against John Calipari, Tom Izzo and Billy Donovan in the first seven games of the 2014-15 season. You gotta love college hoops.

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Michigan State, 61-56, to win the Orlando Classic

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Michigan State, 61-56, to win the Orlando Classic

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Tennessee, 82-67, in Orlando Classic semifinals

By the Numbers: Kansas beats Tennessee, 82-67, in Orlando Classic semifinals

By the numbers: Kansas beats Rhode Island 76-60 in first round of Orlando Classic

By the numbers: Kansas beats Rhode Island 76-60 in first round of Orlando Classic by KUsports.com graphic

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Coaching Search 2014: News, nuggets and nonsense as things heat up

Here's the latest info I'm hearing about the KU coaching search, which, without a doubt, has turned up a notch during the past several days now that the end of the 2014 season has arrived.

If you'll recall from previous interviews we did with KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger, this week is about phone interviews and lining up the list of finalists for what figures to be a serious few days next week.

No word on exactly how many guys will be involved in this week's phone interviews, but the safe guess is in the 12-15 range (probably no more than 20), with the ideal goal being to narrow that list down to 5 or so by the end of the week so things can get serious next week.

I've been told that there is a chance that new candidates could get involved at the 11th hour — many believed that's what happened with Weis, but Zenger told me at one point after Weis was hired that the former Notre Dame coach was on the radar from the outset during the last hire — but given the fact that Zenger, the search committee and consultant Chuck Neinas have had weeks to get their ducks in a row, it would have to be a pretty amazing candidate to get involved in this process so late.

Anyway, as I mentioned on Twitter, I spent a good chunk of Sunday on the phone talking to sources and trying to find out where this whole thing is at, and here's a few quick nuggets along with a little word association game with some of the more well-known names believed to be in the mix.

Take it with a grain of salt, because until we're able to hear from Zenger himself, there's no telling what's true and what's not, plus, as you've seen before, things can change in a hurry with these coaching searches.

• I've been told that there are a few players who are projected returning starters who would consider leaving KU if Clint Bowen is not hired as the head coach. Such threats pop up everywhere during almost every coaching transition and cooler heads often prevail, but this one may have legs given how passionate this roster is about playing for Bowen. It might not get to that, and even if it does, a few of these guys could change their minds. But the names I'm hearing are pretty significant players.

• There's so much talk out there about how much KU could and/or would pay for its next head coach and that dollar value is a little fluid. If the right guy came along, Zenger surely would look at paying a little more than is ideal. Similarly, if the right guy could be had for a bargain price, don't expect Zenger to overpay him just to make the job seem better than it is. That's exactly what happened with Turner Gill and it was a big-time mistake. He should've never been paid $2 million with resume. He likely would've come for half that, since his Buffalo salary was $450,000. All that said, I think the number Zenger would like to settle on is in the $800,000-$1 million range with some hefty incentives added in. There are a lot of good coaches who could be had for that price and, perhaps more importantly, setting it there could weed out some of the guys just looking for a money grab. Remember, Zenger is one of the lowest paid AD's in the Big 12 and that doesn't stop him from working as hard as the others.

• When word broke that Will Muschamp was out at Florida and Bo Pelini was out at Nebraska, KU fans — and many others — jumped on both names as potential hires for the Jayhawks. Don't count on it. I've been told that Muschamp's ties to Florida, which is where Kansas got Weis, hurt his chances, and, as of Sunday night, there had been no contact between Pelini and KU of any kind. That could change, of course, and, if Pelini were to show interest in the job, it seems KU would gladly have a conversation with him. Think of it as Bruce Weber being hired by Kansas State in basketball. A few years ago, when Weber had Illinois rolling and before Bob Huggins and Frank Martin breathed life into the KSU program, a guy like Weber would've never been within reach for the Wildcats. But things happened, the timing was right and K-State landed a solid coach they may not otherwise have had a shot to get. All that said, I'd bet against Pelini coming to KU, largely because of his less-than-friendly reputation and how that might go over with the fans and big donors.

• Along those same lines, and philosophically speaking, I don't think the fact that those guys were fired is what hurts their chances. Hiring a guy who recently was fired seems to be a non-issue with this search, provided it's the right guy.

• One last thing regarding Pelini and the Nebraska job…. The more openings like that the pop up the more the KU pool of candidates gets watered down. That's not to say that the Cornhuskers and Jayhawks would be going after the same guys — that's probably not the case at all — but let's say Nebraska hired a guy like Justin Fuente from Memphis or Scott Frost out of Oregon. The replacements for those guys could be in KU's pool and could impact the hire here. One thing KU has going for it in that regard is the timeline. I still think this thing will be wrapped up sometime next week given the fact that Zenger & Company have had the advantage of that nine-week headstart.

• OK.... Let's finish this update off with a little 10-words-or-less exercise on some of the guys believed to be in the mix. DISCLAIMER: Clearly, this is not everyone who might be involved in this process, just a few of the names who have been thrown around most often.

~ David Beaty – Texas ties have him very much in the hunt
~ Tim Beck – Some concern about what Pelini firing does to him
~ Clint Bowen – Definitely still in it and a likely finalist
~ Dana Dimel – Can't see it
~ Justin Fuente – Strong candidate. Heard there's interest both ways
~ Willie Fritz – Relevant this week but doubt he survives to next week
~ Jim Harbaugh – NFL teams trying to trade for him?
~ Jerry Kill – Too many factors point to no
~ Jim McElwain – $7.5 million buyout & interest from bigger schools
~ Chad Morris – SMU bound, for those who hadn't heard
~ Will Muschamp - He'll be a DC somewhere bigger & try again later
~ Bo Pelini - Could get involved late, but would he?
~ Ed Warriner – He'll get a chance to make his case
~ Matt Wells – Hot name but still a little green

• Finally, my first percentage wheel of the 2014 coaching search… This one's not easy, folks.

  1. Clint Bowen – 45%
  2. Other – 22%
  3. Justin Fuente – 13%
  4. David Beaty – 12%
  5. Matt Wells – 5%
  6. Ed Warinner – 3%
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