Entries from blogs tagged with “KU”

KU chancellor reflects on meeting with DeVos; Ironing boards with a message: Common Work of Art creator speaks Wednesday at KU

Along with 10 other Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) presidents and chancellors, University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little met last week with the new U.S. Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos, in Washington, D.C. Gray-Little shared some takeaways from that meeting in her latest Chancellor’s Message, shared with campus on Monday.

“Given the tremendous volume of news coverage of the new administration, it is neither feasible nor prudent for university leaders to publicly address every idea, proposal, tweet or rumor coming out of Washington,” she wrote. “But it is always appropriate for university leaders to reiterate their institutions’ core principles and remind elected officials that there are some policy preferences and values that are fundamental to our mission.”

Gray-Little highlighted four areas she said will require universities to be vigilant in this “unusual” political environment.

On “targeted threats to specific areas of research”: “We must be watchful for politically motivated attacks on specific areas of research such as gun violence and climate change. While it is understood that democratically elected officials will make policy decisions, it is not acceptable to block universities from making research-based discoveries that are relevant to the policymaking process.”

On research funding in general: “Without adequate and predictable federal funding for research, our nation risks stagnation in key areas, threatening our well-being and eroding our role as global leaders in innovation and our potential contributions to the economy.”

On diversity and inclusion: “This year, more than any year I can remember during the past three decades, (Martin Luther) King’s call for equal justice and true democracy are needed. This is why our efforts to ensure the University of Kansas embraces diversity and inclusion are so important.”

On “the free flow of students and scholars”: “Universities are marketplaces of ideas that rely on the unfettered exchange of ideas among individuals from different backgrounds. Any policy that unnecessarily restricts the free flow of students and scholars will negatively impact our university community.”

Some of the ideas proposed by the new administration have sparked valid concerns at universities nationwide, including KU, Gray-Little said. She said KU continues to work with peers and lawmakers to be part of the policymaking process on issues that affect higher education.


Ironing boards with a message: Ta-Nehisi Coates, the author of the 2016-17 University of Kansas Common Book, “Between the World and Me,” did not make an appearance at the university this year. The keynote lecture in the common book events series was delivered back in September by author and editor Jabari Asim. But in conjunction with the Common Book, KU also has a Common Work of Art, and its creator will be here for an event this week.

“An Evening with Artist Willie Cole” is planned for 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday in the auditorium at Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi St. Cole will speak about his artistic practices and themes.

The Common Work of Art is a group of three 2012 intaglio/relief prints from Cole’s “Beauties” series, “Calpurnia,” “Bertha Mae,” and “Lula Bell.” Each of the tall, narrow black-and-white prints — displayed side-by-side, reminiscent of a triptych — portrays a different ironing board.

The University of Kansas' 2016-17 Common Work of Art — Willie Cole's "Calpurnia," "Bertha Mae" and "Lula Bell," of 2012 — are displayed inside the Learning Center at KU's Spencer Museum of Art, in October 2016.

The University of Kansas' 2016-17 Common Work of Art — Willie Cole's "Calpurnia," "Bertha Mae" and "Lula Bell," of 2012 — are displayed inside the Learning Center at KU's Spencer Museum of Art, in October 2016. by Sara Shepherd

“Cole is perhaps best known for his assemblage sculptures composed of irons, women's shoes, and hair dryers, which he transforms into objects resembling West African sculpture,” according to the Spencer’s description of the common work. “When discussing his process of altering everyday objects to reference African forms, Cole notes, ‘I think that when one culture is dominated by another culture, the energy or powers, or gods of the previous culture hide in vehicles in the new cultures.’” 

Cole acquired the metal ironing boards from the Salvation Army and Craigslist, according to the Spencer. After flattening the boards by doing things such as driving over them, pounding them with hammers and running them through an etching press, the resulting prints resemble “shrouded figures as well as diagrams of slave ships that were circulated by abolitionists in the 18th and 19th centuries.” Each board’s old-fashioned title references Cole’s ancestors, family or iconic slaves or domestics from literature, including Calpurnia from “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

The artwork is on display in the new Learning Center area of the recently renovated Spencer Museum of Art.

Process shot from creating “Beauties,” courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the artist, Willie Cole.

Process shot from creating “Beauties,” courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the artist, Willie Cole.

Process shot from creating “Beauties,” courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the artist, Willie Cole.

Process shot from creating “Beauties,” courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the artist, Willie Cole.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

Campus carry: KU elected leaders wonder, would insurance pay if they were shot on campus?

Some University of Kansas Senate representatives have suggested that the body demand that KU provide employees and students with insurance that would pay for injury, long-term disability or death should they get shot on campus.

It’s possible that existing KU insurance already addresses workplace injury coverage including bullet wounds, but right now governance representatives aren’t sure. After discussions at Tuesday’s Faculty Senate Executive Committee and Thursday’s full University Senate meetings, the full Senate agreed to send the issue to a committee to figure out before making any formal recommendations.

Without knowing the status quo, the insurance question and proposal seem half-baked at this point (hence, the referral to committee). But the spirit is loud and clear.

As the calendar ticks down to campus carry — scheduled to become legal in four months — it’s another example of the types of fears, questions, discussions and suggestions university governance representatives are coming up with.

As covered last week in Heard on the Hill, governance also is talking about how much KU should be required to advertise concealed carry to the KU community and prospective students and employees. The full University Senate also talked about that on Thursday, and agreed that it, too, needs more review before a formal resolution goes to a vote. (Suggestions include everything from linking to concealedcarry.ku.edu from KU’s homepage to purchasing ads in The University Daily Kansan of a specific size, location and frequency.)

Faculty Senate representative Lynn Hancock, associate professor of molecular biosciences, said he’d just met with a prospective student and parent who, among other things, asked what was going on with the gun law. While the law could affect some students’ and employees’ decisions to come to KU, it did not seem to be a deal-breaker for this particular family.

“From their perspective they didn’t care,” Hancock said. “I think we have a lot of opinions that are going rampant, but I think the information needs to be available.”

In Faculty Senate, suggestions from faculty have even included considering unionizing to better lobby for employee safety and changing policies to allow faculty who want a weapons-free environment to conduct all their teaching and other duties remotely, at private or federal off-campus locations that prohibit guns.

For now, those too are just discussions. As far as formulating concerns into specific proposals and voting on them, Faculty Senate representative Ron Barrett-Gonzalez, professor of aerospace engineering, urged governance representatives to hurry.

“I think that given the sense of urgency we should move forward and press on,” he said. “I’m not sure that we should delay.”


Like music? Not busy next weekend? Here are two events worth noting.

• Rock Chalk Revue: KU’s greek community is performing Rock Chalk Revue — musicals written, choreographed and staged by participating chapters — next weekend at the Lied Center. Show times are 7 p.m. March 2, 3 and 4. This year’s theme is “It Takes Two to Tango.” Tickets are $20 to $25 and can be purchased at lied.ku.edu.

The campus variety show dates to 1949, and organizers say it’s one of the largest student-run philanthropies in the United States. Last year’s show raised $60,000 for charity. Find more information at rockchalkrevue.org.

• Anniversary jazz concerts: The KU School of Music is presenting its 40th Annual KU Jazz Festival concerts at 7:30 p.m. March 3 and March 4 in Woodruff Auditorium at the Kansas Union. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and $10 with a KU ID, and can be purchased at the KU SUA office or by calling 785-864-7469. Following the main stage concerts, check out the After Hours Jazz Sessions from 10 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. at The Oread, 1200 Oread Ave.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

KU Crime Blotter: Feb. 13-19

The following incidents were reported to the University of Kansas Office of Public Safety between Monday, Feb. 13, and Sunday, Feb. 19. Incidents are listed by date reported. This list may not include all crimes reported to police during the date range, as incidents occasionally are posted online longer than two days after being reported.

Feb. 19

• Police found people in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia inside a vehicle about 9:30 p.m. Feb. 19 at Lot 109, 1600 block of West 15th St.

• Someone knocked over a KU sign, then two unknown people tried to take it between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Feb. 19 at Wescoe Hall. The suspects were only able to take part of the sign. Loss was valued at $1,500.

• Someone damaged the driver’s side bumper and mirror of an unattended vehicle Feb. 18 or Feb. 19 at GSP Residence Hall. Damage was estimated at $500.

Feb. 18

• Someone entered an office and stole someone’s wallet off her desk Feb. 18 at Capitol Federal Hall. Loss was valued at $50.

Feb. 17

• Someone stole a bike and bike lock Feb. 17 at the Kansas Union. Loss was valued at $366.

• Someone removed a bike that was locked to a rack between Feb. 15 and Feb. 17 in front of Lewis Residence Hall. Loss was valued at $490.

Feb. 16

• Someone took a wallet Feb. 13 or Feb. 14 from Krehbiel Scholarship Hall. Loss was valued at $60.

Feb. 15

• Someone took an unsaturated soil testing system between Jan. 23 and Jan. 31 at Learned Hall. Loss was valued at $10,784.

• Someone took a camera from a room Feb. 14 or Feb. 15 at Dole Human Development Center. Loss was valued at $2,995.

Feb. 14

• During a consent search police found someone in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia about 7:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at Rieger Scholarship Hall.

• During a consent search prompted by marijuana odor, police found a minor in possession of alcohol, marijuana, drug paraphernalia and a fake ID about 3:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at Ellsworth Residence Hall.

Source: crimereports.com, KU Office of Public Safety

KU Office of Public Safety patrol vehicle, pictured June 2016

KU Office of Public Safety patrol vehicle, pictured June 2016 by Sara Shepherd


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply 1 comment from Jim Sullivan

KU Sports Extra: Party Time at Allen Fieldhouse

Reply

Postgame Pressers: KU 87, TCU 68

Bill Self on Wednesday's victory and winning Big 12 title No. 13 in a row

Jayhawks Frank Mason III, Devonte' Graham and Josh Jackson discuss another Big 12 title

TCU coach Jamie Dixon and Horned Frogs Alex Robinson and Kenrich Williams on Wednesday's loss to Kansas and what the Jayhawks did right to make for a long night

Brandon Rush on the experience of having his jersey raised to the rafters

Reply

Baseline View: Jayhawks get their 13th-straight conference title

Reply

Jayhawks celebrate after winning their 13th-straight Big 12 title

Reply

Brandon Rush speaks during his jersey retirement ceremony

Reply

Bill Self on his favorite Brandon Rush memories

Reply

Hang that jersey: A look back at Brandon Rush’s KU career

Former Kansas basketball star Brandon Rush will have his jersey retired at Allen Fieldhouse Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, during a halftime ceremony of the Jayhawks’ home game against TCU.

A three-time All-Big 12 first-teamer, Rush scored 1,477 points in his three-year college career, which concluded with him helping the Jayhawks win a 2008 national championship.

Reply

Former KU teammates Charles Gordon and Aqib Talib reunited with Broncos

Kansas receiver Charles Gordon pulls in a long pass from quarterback Jason Swanson under the coverage of Colorado safety Tyrone Henderson in the first quarter of the KU-CU game Saturday in Boulder, Colo., in October, 2005.

Kansas receiver Charles Gordon pulls in a long pass from quarterback Jason Swanson under the coverage of Colorado safety Tyrone Henderson in the first quarter of the KU-CU game Saturday in Boulder, Colo., in October, 2005. by Nick Krug

Before Kansas football great Aqib Talib made the No. 3 jersey his own in Lawrence, wowing spectators in Memorial Stadium with his prowess in the secondary, Charles Gordon did the same.

Donning the very same No. 3 on his chest and back and drawing the adulation of the KU faithful as both a defensive back and receiver, Gordon was the Talib prototype for Mark Maningo’s teams in advance of people knowing about the future NFL Pro Bowler, Talib.

Gordon and Talib spent one season together at KU, on a 2005 team that went 7-5 and beat Houston in the Fort Worth Bowl. Now the two get a chance to team up under different circumstances in the NFL. The Denver Broncos have hired Gordon as a defensive quality control assistant.

The move to the pro ranks for Gordon came after the former Jayhawks standout spent four seasons on Northern Colorado’s staff at the college level, coaching defensive backs on Earnest Collins’ staff. A former KU assistant from 2003-06, Collins coached Gordon on special teams and in the secondary for Mangino’s teams.

"Anytime you run a program you want your coaches to excel and move on," Collins said in a UNC release about Gordon’s new job with Denver. "When you had a player that played for you, like Chuck did for me, and then also worked for you moving on to bigger and better things – it's like a family member moving on, or a son in a sense. I'm thankful for everything Coach Gordon did for me while he was here and I'm proud to see him moving into a new role with the Broncos."

Gordon was a two-time First-Team All-Big 12 selection (2004 and 2005) at KU, and earned Third-Team All-American AP honors in 2004. He was also a First-Team Freshman All-American in 2003, after catching 57 passes for 769 yards and 5 touchdowns.

In his three seasons at Kansas, prior to turning pro, Gordon caught 106 passes for 1,232 yards and 9 touchdowns on offense, and made nine interceptions on defense, while averaging 10.4 yards on his 99 punt returns.

The 5-foot-11 corner spent three seasons with the Minnesota Vikings before suffering a career-ending leg injury in 2008. Gordon started six games in the NFL, and made 2 interceptions and 64 tackles.

KU's Charles Gordon (3) breaks up an intended pass in the first half against Louisiana Tech's Johnathan Holland (7), in September, 2005.

KU's Charles Gordon (3) breaks up an intended pass in the first half against Louisiana Tech's Johnathan Holland (7), in September, 2005. by Richard Gwin

Reply

Professor to lecture on Dreamers; free lunch courtesy of CLAS; Allen Fieldhouse as seen through a GoPro on a trombone

Dreamers and their futures here in the United States have been in the news a lot recently, usually more as a collective than individually, it seems. A University of Kansas professor is planning a lecture about the immigrant group Tuesday evening on campus as part of the new(ish) KU Center for Migration Research’s Migration Lecture Series.

Marta Caminero-Santangelo, professor of English and interim director of KU’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, will present “Stories of the Undocumented: Cultural Trauma and American DREAMers” at 7 p.m. Tuesday at The Commons at Spooner Hall, 1340 Jayhawk Blvd. There’s a reception beginning at 6:30 p.m.

"At this historical moment, it is (sadly) more important than ever to be listening to and talking about these stories that aren’t really getting heard in larger society and that get lost in the immigration debate,” Caminero-Santangelo said, in an announcement from KU.

Caminero-Santangelo has authored and co-authored a number of books and scholarly articles, including her most recent book, “Documenting the Undocumented: Latino/a Narratives and Social Justice in the Era of Operation Gatekeeper,” according to a KU announcement. As part of its Foundation Distinguished Professors initiative, KU recruited professors of sociology Victor Agadjanian and Cecilia Menjívar, who arrived at KU and founded the Center for Migration Research in fall 2015.

Dreamers refers to immigrants affected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which President Barack Obama launched in 2012 to temporarily shield from deportation young people who came to the United States illegally as children.


CLAS diversity lunches: KU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences this month launched an inclusion-focused lunchtime meeting series planned for 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Wednesday through May 3 (except spring break) at Watson Library, 3 West.

First thing to know, there will be free Burrito King. As for what will be discussed, a KU announcement describes the drop-in meetings as “unstructured settings that encourage students to engage with students, staff and faculty from across campus as well as learn about events and opportunities to become involved in efforts to build diverse, equitable and inclusive working and learning environments.”

The CLAS Time lunches were developed by the Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion within CLAS, which in the fall launched a broader plan to increase diversity, equity and inclusion.


Trombone’s eye view: For people not prone to motion sickness looking for a new angle on Allen Fieldhouse, Brian Wise, a senior trombone player for the KU basketball band, has a GoPro camera and sometimes posts awesome footage from his instrument on his Instagram account, @bwise42. (Hat tip to The University Daily Kansan, which featured Wise last week.)


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

Baseline View: Jayhawks get another big road win against Baylor

Reply

Ahead of KU-Baylor battle of potential No. 1 seeds, Bill Self says Big 12 not top-heavy

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hangs for a shot against Baylor guard Manu Lecomte (20) during the first half, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hangs for a shot against Baylor guard Manu Lecomte (20) during the first half, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

When No. 3 Kansas plays at No. 4 Baylor Saturday in Waco, Texas, the nation will be able to tune in (noon, CBS) and check out not only the top two teams in the Big 12, but also two potential No. 1 seeds in the NCAA Tournament.

Still, KU coach Bill Self doesn’t want those unfamiliar with the conference to get the idea the Big 12 is top-heavy. Ahead of the marquee meeting at Ferrell Center, Self shared Thursday afternoon he thinks “the strength of our league is the middle of our league.”

To his point, the five teams trailing the Big 12’s top three — KU, Baylor and West Virginia — in the standings all have a shot at making The Big Dance in March, too.

“The difference between the middle and the teams that are perceived to be at the top is not very much at all,” Self said, “as evidenced by (Baylor’s) scores and also by our scores.”

Baylor just lost at Texas Tech this week, and in February one-possession games dropped one at home against Kansas State and beat Oklahoma State, in Stillwater.

KU, as you’ll recall, only won by a single point at Texas Tech this past Saturday, clawed its way to a three-point victory at rival K-State and suffered a rare Allen Fieldhouse defeat at the hands of Iowa State during the past couple of weeks.

“I do think it’s a monster league,” Self said, “because 18 games, round-robin, and even home games, as you guys well know with us, they’re not a cinch by any stretch.”

The overall quality and depth of the Big 12 could get as many as eight teams into the NCAA Tournament in March, depending on how the next few weeks play out. As of Thursday, ESPN’s Bracketology projected seven Big 12 teams in the tourney:

Kansas: 1 seed in Midwest region

Baylor: 1 seed in South

West Virginia: 4 seed in West

Oklahoma State: 8 seed in East

Iowa State: 9 seed in West

TCU: 10 seed in East

Kansas State: 11 seed in South

Texas Tech: “Next four out,” behind “first four out”

The NCAA Tournament selection committee identified Kansas and Baylor as No. 1 seeds (as of Feb. 11), this past Saturday. Self said, in the case of this year’s Big 12 makeup, there isn’t a “bottom-heavy” factor, where teams such as Kansas and Baylor can pencil in three or four automatic victories.

Coach Socrates — oh, sorry, Coach Self, that is — said the Big 12 may be undervalued by outsiders because “the appearance of parity breeds the thought of mediocrity.” In the conference KU calls home, though, nothing comes easily this season. Just look at the average margin of victory for the top two teams in the league: Kansas (11-2 in Big 12) is at +4.1 and Baylor (9-4) at +3.9.

“But having two teams this late in the year,” Self said, “that are projected as one seeds — and even though we KNOW that that’s gonna change from week to week — I think speaks well for our league.”

BIG 12 STANDINGS — As of Feb. 16

1. Kansas, 11-2 (23-3 overall)

2. Baylor, 9-4 (22-4)

3. West Virginia, 8-5 (20-6)

4. Iowa State, 8-5 (16-9)

tie-5. Oklahoma State, 6-7 (17-9)

tie-5. TCU, 6-7 (17-9)

tie-7. Texas Tech, 5-8 (17-9)

tie-7.Kansas State, 5-8 (16-10)

9. Texas, 4-9 (10-16)

10. Oklahoma, 3-10 (9-16)

Reply

Should KU be required to actively advertise that it’s a concealed carry campus? University Senate execs discuss

I should start by saying that this suggestion, brought forward by some University Senate Executive Committee members, failed to gain endorsement by the full committee. But it did elicit debate during Tuesday’s committee meeting and is on the agenda to be discussed by full University Senate next week.

How far should the University of Kansas go to spread the word that concealed carry is allowed on its campus, starting July 1? And how differently should this law be treated from other laws?

The proposed resolution demanded that the KU administration inform current and potential students, faculty and staff of the law’s provisions, in the following forms:

• Official emails to students (and legal guardians for those under 18), faculty and staff describing the law and legislative actions that are underway or pending.

• Notifications on all public doorways.

• Emails and fliers to prospective students and their families “highlighting the presence of guns in dorms.”

• Notifications by all campus tour guides hosting prospective students and their families.

• Notifications to all international students and employees that federal law bars them from carrying guns.

• Notification in all offers of employment, and university job ads.

• Notifications on KU’s home page, ku.edu, “at least half as large as the largest sports banner that has been posted.”

• Weekly ads in The University Daily Kansan near page 1 and measuring at least 3-by-3 inches.

Those who argued for the resolution said it would help prevent KU from trying to hide the fact that guns are allowed on campus from prospective students, parents and faculty hires. People shouldn't learn about it only after moving to campus, they said.

Committee members against it argued that the resolution was overreaching, its demands too specific. Student body vice-president Gabby Naylor, who is from Rhode Island, said anyone coming from out-of-state has a responsibility for knowing laws in their new homes.

“I think that that’s your responsibility to understand,” she said. “I don’t think that the school should have to tell you the law.”

No guns allowed signs are posted on doors leading into Wescoe Hall on the University of Kansas campus on Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Jayhawk Boulevard and Strong Hall are reflected in the glass.

No guns allowed signs are posted on doors leading into Wescoe Hall on the University of Kansas campus on Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Jayhawk Boulevard and Strong Hall are reflected in the glass. by Sara Shepherd

In late January, the university website concealedcarry.ku.edu went live. It’s home to a host of information and additional links about the law, KU’s policy and safety recommendations. As of this week, at least, I did not see a direct link to the site on KU’s online homepage. University Senate president Joe Harrington, professor of English, said he was still waiting to hear whether KU planned to add a link to its home and admissions pages. The webpage for KU’s Office of the Provost — which created the concealed carry page — does contain a direct link.

I do know two more places that will definitely contain notification of the law, because Kansas Board of Regents Policy requires it: housing contracts and tickets for certain events. For state universities to set up metal detectors and prohibit guns at athletic or other large ticketed events, tickets must state that concealed guns won’t be allowed in.

University Senate Executive Committee wasn’t the only place people were talking about campus carry this week. It’s also come up:

• At the Regents meeting: Now, faculty senates at five of the six state universities have passed resolutions opposing campus carry, KU Faculty Senate president Pam Keller, clinical professor of law, told the board during its meeting Wednesday in Topeka. She said the sixth, Pittsburg State, is considering a similar resolution.

• At Budig Hall: About 150 people attended a campus carry informational meeting Wednesday, organized by the Office of the Provost. Questions were asked, answers were given — and not necessarily the answers all attendees wanted to hear. (See related story here.)

• At the statehouse: A Kansas House committee narrowly voted not to advance a bill that would have exempted the University of Kansas hospital complex (not the same as an academic campus, but currently affected by the same law) from the upcoming requirement to allow people to carry concealed firearms. (See related story here.)

Clarification: An earlier version of this post said the proposed notification resolution died in University Senate Executive Committee. What actually got voted down was a motion for the committee to endorse the resolution. It'll be heard by the full Senate anyway, sans the endorsement.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply 4 comments from Bob Smith Bonnie Uffman John Middleton Bob Forer

KU Crime Blotter: Feb. 6-12

The following incidents were reported to the University of Kansas Office of Public Safety between Monday, Feb. 6, and Sunday, Feb. 12. Incidents are listed by date reported. This list may not include all crimes reported to police during the date range, as incidents occasionally are posted online longer than two days after being reported.

Feb. 12

• Someone entered a residence, took some items and damaged others about 1 a.m. Feb. 12 at Stephenson Scholarship Hall. Loss was valued at $830.

Feb. 11

• Someone entered an unlocked vehicle and removed items about 3:40 a.m. Feb. 11 at Lot 90, 1800 block Naismith Drive.

Feb. 10

• Burglary and criminal damage to property occurred Feb. 10 at Lot 105, 1800 block Engel Road. Two unknown males were found rummaging through the victim’s car and damaged a trunk divider, but fled before police arrived. Loss was valued at $50.

• Someone took an anthropometer from a display case between Feb. 8 and Feb. 10 at Fraser Hall. Loss was valued at $2,000.

Feb. 7

• Two unknown people took someone’s wallet from a locker in the women’s locker room Feb. 7 at Ambler Student Recreation Center. Loss was valued at $200.

• Three people were found in a parked vehicle, two of which were in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia about 12:30 a.m. Feb. 7 at Lot 300, 1600 block Stewart Drive.


Older report: The following incident was not available when the Journal-World published the corresponding week’s KU Crime Blotter. It was added to CrimeReports.com later.

Jan. 27

• Unlawful acts involving a computer occurred in the 1800 block of Naismith Drive, on an unlisted date or dates. Someone convinced a victim to expose him or herself using a computer and then demanded money.

Source: crimereports.com, KU Office of Public Safety

KU Office of Public Safety patrol vehicle, pictured June 2016

KU Office of Public Safety patrol vehicle, pictured June 2016 by Sara Shepherd


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

Avengers: Bill Self’s KU teams never have suffered a Big 12 sweep

Kansas head coach Bill Self pulls in the Jayhawks for a huddle with seconds remaining in overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas head coach Bill Self pulls in the Jayhawks for a huddle with seconds remaining in overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

As astonishing as the Kansas basketball team’s do-or-die comeback was in the final minutes Monday night against West Virginia, the Jayhawks’ absurd rally and overtime victory helped preserve an equally staggering example of the program’s dominance.

The Mountaineers, up 14 points with less than three minutes to play in regulation, had a chance to do something no team has pulled off since Bill Self became the head coach at Kansas before the 2003-2004 season: sweep KU.

That’s right. No Self-coached Kansas team has ever suffered two regular-season losses to the same Big 12 opponent. The Jayhawks, in the 14th season of the Self era, now have played 88 home-and-home series. KU has swept 60 of them, split 28 and never come away 0-2.

As one might predict from the program’s toughness-preaching coach, Self said after KU’s 84-80 overtime win against WVU he and his players take pride in the fact that Big 12 foes just don’t sweep his teams.

“Sure we do. They probably should’ve,” Self added, of WVU ending the sweep-less streak this season. “They were better than us in Morgantown and they were better than us tonight for the most part — for the large part of the game.”

However, with the Allen Fieldhouse crowd growing more rambunctious by the second as the No. 3 Jayhawks (23-3 overall, 11-2 Big 12) chopped away at the West Virginia lead, KU preserved a less-discussed aspect of its conference dominance. What’s more, it marked the fifth occasion in Self’s tenure that KU thwarted a sweep with an overtime victory.

The last team to sweep Kansas was Iowa State, in 2001.

Below is a rundown of the Jayhawks’ avenging ways over the course of the past 14 seasons. When Big 12 opponents won the first meeting with Kansas, Self’s teams are a perfect 16-0 in rematches.

2004

Lost at Iowa State, 68-61 | Won rematch, 90-89 (OT)

Lost at Nebraska, 74-55 | Won rematch, 78-67

2006

Lost at home to Kansas State, 59-55 | Won rematch at K-State, 66-52

Lost at Missouri, 89-86 (OT) | Won rematch, 79-46

2008

Lost at Kansas State, 84-75 | Won rematch, 88-74

2009

Lost at Missouri, 62-60 | Won rematch, 90-65

2012

Lost at Missouri, 74-71 | Won rematch, 87-86 (OT)

2013

Lost at home to Oklahoma State, 85-80 | Won rematch at Oklahoma State, 68-67 (2OT)

Lost at TCU, 62-55 | Won rematch, 74-48

2014

Lost at Texas, 81-69 | Won rematch, 85-54

2015

Lost at Iowa State, 86-81 | Won rematch, 89-76

Lost at West Virginia, 62-61 | Won rematch, 76-69 (OT)

2016

Lost at West Virginia, 74-63 | Won rematch, 75-65

Lost at Oklahoma State, 86-67 | Won rematch, 94-67

Lost at Iowa State, 85-72 | Won rematch, 85-78

2017

Lost at West Virginia, 85-69 | Won rematch, 84-80 (OT)

West Virginia forward Nathan Adrian (11) reacts after losing a ball off of his knee during overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

West Virginia forward Nathan Adrian (11) reacts after losing a ball off of his knee during overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

In the old days of the Big 12, when Kansas only played the teams from the south division once in the regular season, the Jayhawks didn’t even encounter any potential sweeps in 2005, 2007, 2010 or 2011. Still, in both 2008 and 2011, KU earned retribution for losses to Texas in the Big 12 Tournament.

Since the round-robin, 18-game schedule went into effect in 2012, KU has overcome a potential 0-2 mark against a league team at least once every season.

The Jayhawks’ latest star freshman, Josh Jackson, obviously has only been around for a few weeks worth of Big 12 battles. But the culture Self long ago established was apparent to Jackson and his teammates on Big Monday, with a West Virginia sweep in play.

“Sometimes it’s not our night, like tonight I don’t really think it was,” Jackson said after chipping in 14 points, 11 rebounds, five steals and three assists. “But you’ve just gotta get it done on the defensive end. As long as we make our opponents play bad, I think we’ll be fine.”

Now 408-86 as KU’s head coach, Self’s teams thrive on pulling off the preposterous, particularly at Allen Fieldhouse, where he improved to 218-10. On the rare occasions when an opponent looks like it has KU’s number, that’s when Self can employ atypical tactics.

“I didn’t talk once about the league race. I didn’t talk about any of that stuff,” Self said of his message leading up to the West Virginia rematch. “All I told ’em was, ‘You’ve got a chance to play a team that put a pretty good knot on your head the last time we played.’ And they were motivated. I think they just tried too hard early on in the game.”

— Addendum: On the subject of losing twice to the same team in a season, it has happened in the Self era — just not in terms of a regular-season sweep. Below are the teams who pulled off multiple victories over Self teams during one campaign, over the past 14 years.

2004

Lost at Texas 82-67 | Lost Big 12 Tournament rematch, 64-60, in Dallas

2009

Lost at Michigan State, 75-62 | Lost Sweet 16 rematch, 67-62, in Indianapolis

2012

Lost to Kentucky, 75-65, in New York | Lost NCAA title game rematch, 67-59, in New Orleans

2015

Iowa State, after splitting in the regular season, won Round 3, 70-66, in Big 12 title game, in Kansas City

Reply

Postgame Pressers: KU 84, West Virginia 80, OT

Kansas players Josh Jackson, Frank Mason & Devonte' Graham along with head coach Bill Self

West Virginia's Nathan Adrian, Bob Huggins and Esa Ahmad

Reply

KU Sports Extra: Wild Comeback Sinks West Virginia

Reply

Baseline View: Jayhawks get a huge overtime win over West Virginia

Reply

Prev