Entries from blogs tagged with “Kansas”

Highlight reel: Jayhawks defeat TCU on the road

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Baseline view: Kansas beats TCU in Fort Worth

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Boy Scouts troops’ handcrafted planetarium now open at library

Stargazers, particularly those of the small variety, should appreciate the latest addition to the Lawrence Public Library’s atrium.

In honor of the library’s space-themed Read Across Lawrence teen series, which blasted off earlier this week, a pair of local Boy Scouts troops have built a miniature planetarium fashioned out of cardboard and binder clips, now open to astronomical enthusiasts of all ages at the library.

A young boy peeks inside the Icarus planetarium in the atrium of the Lawrence Public Library, 707 Vermont St. Boy Scouts of America Troops 55 and 61 constructed the project out of cardboard and binder clips. From inside the structure a light display of several constellations is projected on the ceiling.

A young boy peeks inside the Icarus planetarium in the atrium of the Lawrence Public Library, 707 Vermont St. Boy Scouts of America Troops 55 and 61 constructed the project out of cardboard and binder clips. From inside the structure a light display of several constellations is projected on the ceiling. by Mike Yoder

The whole thing fits up to six adults comfortably, says teen librarian Miriam Wallen. Plenty more if we’re talking about little kids.

“Overall, it’s been really enjoyed,” Wallen says. “Some people go in for a bit and take a quick glance at the stars, and some people stay for a while and watch it slowly rotate.”

The stargazing structure arrived in pieces Tuesday night, when Boy Scouts troops No. 55 and No. 61 assembled the 40 triangular pieces into a geodesic dome and stationed it in the atrium with help from library staffers.

It’s since become something of a fixture there and even has its own nickname: Icarus, after the fictional spaceship in “These Broken Stars,” this year’s official Read Across Lawrence selection for teens.

The cardboard creation will remain in the library atrium through the end of the month – or possibly sooner, “depending on how many people fall on it,” Wallen says.

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These guys again: KU visiting last-place TCU

TCU head coach Trent Johnson argues a with an official over a foul called against the Horned Frogs during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse

TCU head coach Trent Johnson argues a with an official over a foul called against the Horned Frogs during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse by Nick Krug

In its first rematch of the season, Kansas gets the only Big 12 team headed into the weekend with a losing record: TCU.

Of course, the Jayhawks haven’t exactly looked stellar in road games this season — see KU’s current 3-game road losing streak and 2-3 record inside opposing arenas — so they can’t even take the Horned Frogs (10-12 overall, 1-8 Big 12) lightly. Kansas (18-4, 6-3) needs all the wins it can get while chasing Oklahoma and West Virginia, who are tied for first in the conference standings, at 7-2.

In Big 12 home games, TCU has:

- lost to West Virginia, 95-87

- defeated Texas, 58-57

- lost to Texas Tech, 76-69

- lost to Iowa State, 73-60

Clearly, Trent Johnson’s guys are struggling. Still, last season the Horned Frogs played within 3 points of KU in Fort Worth, Texas, then lost by 5 to Kansas at the Big 12 Tournament. Johnson’s teams have a way of muddying up games against the Jayhawks to make them competitive.

In 6 of TCU’s losses this year, the Frogs have either led or trailed by single digits in the final six minutes. They pulled that off in a 70-63 loss at Allen Fieldhouse last month by closing the game on an 11-1 run in the final two minutes.

With all of that in mind, get reacquainted with the Horned Frogs No. 7 KU will have to keep in check in order to end its road losing streak.

TCU STARTERS

No. 3 — G Malique Trent | 6-2, 185, soph.

TCU guard Malique Trent (3) goes to the basket over Oklahoma center Akolda Manyang (30) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Norman, Okla., Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

TCU guard Malique Trent (3) goes to the basket over Oklahoma center Akolda Manyang (30) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Norman, Okla., Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

— Jan. 16 at KU: Did not play

  • TCU’s leading scorer, sophomore Malique Trent (11.5 points per game) didn’t play against Kansas in the first meeting, as he sat out for disciplinary reasons. That could mean trouble for the Jayhawks, who haven’t faced him and now will see a likely motivated guard playing in his home arena.

  • Trent, who missed 3 Big 12 games, is averaging 9.5 points and shooting 38.2% in conference action. He has only hit 2 of his 17 attempts from 3-point range (11.8%) vs. league foes.

  • Scored 14 of his team-high 15 points in the second half this past Saturday, when TCU defeated Tennessee (and former Texas coach Rick Barnes) in the Big 12/SEC Challenge. Tennessee would beat Kentucky a few days later.

  • Ranks 5th in the Big 12, with 1.79 steals a game, and has 34 thefts on the season.

  • A juco transfer, Trent swiped 5 steals against Iowa State.

No. 1 — G Chauncey Collins | 6-0, 180, soph.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) reaches for an attempted steal from TCU guard Chauncey Collins (1) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) reaches for an attempted steal from TCU guard Chauncey Collins (1) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Jan. 16 at KU: 11 points, 3/8 FGs, 3/5 3-pointers, 2/3 FTs, 3 rebounds, 2 assists, 4 turnovers in 32 minutes

  • The Frogs’ leading scorer in Big 12 games, sophomore Chauncey Collins (12.1 ppg in league), has proven to be a threat from 3-point range, making 22 of 54 (40.7%) against the rest of the conference, while playing a team-high 32.6 minutes a game.

  • Collins has made 3 or more 3-pointers on 5 occasions in Big 12 play.

  • Against top-25 league opponents, Collins averages 13.0 points and 3.0 assists, while shooting 46% from 3-point range. Scored a career-high 20 points vs. West Virginia.

  • Collins is TCU’s best free-throw shooter (79.7%) and leads the team with 41 made 3-pointers this season.

  • In his last 3 games, Collins has been held to single-digit scoring totals by Texas, Tennessee and Oklahoma.

No. 11 — G Brandon Parrish | 6-6, 210, jr.

Iowa State's Georges Niang, left, and Abdel Nader (2) defend as TCU guard Brandon Parrish (11) looks for an opportunity to the basket during an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. Iowa State won 73-60. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Iowa State's Georges Niang, left, and Abdel Nader (2) defend as TCU guard Brandon Parrish (11) looks for an opportunity to the basket during an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. Iowa State won 73-60. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

— Jan. 16 at KU: 11 points, 4/9 FGs, 3/6 3s, 3 rebounds, 1 turnover in 29 minutes

  • The only Horned Frog to start all 9 Big 12 games for Johnson, junior Brandon Parrish averages only 6.7 points in conference, while shooting 38.3% from the field and 12 of 31 from 3-point land (38.7%).

  • On the season, Parrish leads TCU in 3-point percentage: 31 of 69, for 44.9%.

  • Led TCU in scoring (15 points) in the Frogs’ only Big 12 victory of the season so far, at home vs. Texas.

  • In the final 5 minutes of games, Parrish has shot 9-for-18 from the floor.

No. 33 — F Chris Washburn | 6-8, 240, jr.

None by Carlos A. Mendez

— Jan. 16 at KU: 8 points, 2/8 FGs, 0/1 3s, 4/5 FTs, 3 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 turnovers, 1 block in 23 minutes (4 fouls)

  • Averaging 8.3 points in Big 12 games, junior Chris Washburn has been the most turnover-prone Frog vs. league opponents, with 2.6 giveaways a game.

  • A returning starter and a captain, Washburn missed the first 11 games of the season with a hand injury. Last season, he ranked 7th in the Big 12 in blocks and 8th in steals. Through 11 games (8 starts) this season, Washburn has just 7 blocks and 17 steals.

  • Scored 15 points and had 4 steals in a loss to Oklahoma after putting up 14 points, 9 rebounds and 5 assists in a win over Tennessee.

No. 23 — F Devonta Abron | 6-8, 260, sr.

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) pulls an offensive rebound away from TCU forward Devonta Abron (23), forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) and guard Michael Williams (2) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) pulls an offensive rebound away from TCU forward Devonta Abron (23), forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) and guard Michael Williams (2) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Jan. 16 at KU: 0 points, 0/2 FGs, 1 rebound, 1 steal in 5 minutes off the bench

  • With only 1 Big 12 start so far this season, senior Devonta Abron comes in averaging just 2.8 points in 8.3 minutes in conference.

  • Has started the past 2 games for TCU, averaging 5.0 points and 4.5 rebounds, while taking just 5 total field goals in 13.0 minutes a game.

  • The Frogs’ only senior, Abron is shooting 48% from the floor on the season, the second-best mark on the team.

TCU BENCH

No. 10 — F Vladimir Brodziansky | 6-10, 215, soph.

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) grabs a rebound over TCU forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34).

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) grabs a rebound over TCU forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34). by Nick Krug

— Jan. 16 at KU: 8 points, 3/11 FGs, 1/2 3s, 1/2 FTs, 12 rebounds (6 offensive), 1 steal in 26 minutes off the bench

  • A dangerous offensive weapon for TCU off the bench, sophomore Vlad Brodziansky almost had a double-double at KU and averages 8.3 points and 4.6 rebounds in Big 12 play.

  • Led TCU with 17 points and 8 boards against OU, hitting 8 of his 11 field goals.

  • A transfer from Pratt Community College in Kansas, the Slovakia native has scored in double-figures 13 times in his first season at TCU.

  • Brodziansky is shooting 14 of 23 from the field in the final 5 minutes of games.

  • His 42 offensive rebounds lead the team, as do his 21 blocked shots and 11 dunks.

  • The big man doesn’t mind stepping outside, but he has hit on just 9 of 26 3-pointers (34.6%).

  • Brodziansky leads the team in field-goal percentage: 54.5%.

No. 32 — F Karviar Shepherd | 6-10, 230, jr.

None by TCU Basketball

— Jan. 16 at KU: 4 points, 2/4 FGs, 0/1 3s, 2 rebounds, 1 turnover, 1 steal in 23 minutes (4 fouls) as a starter

  • Formerly a starter, junior big man Karviar Shepherd’s role has changed of late, coming off the bench in the past 3 games. He has shot just 29% from the floor while averaging 6.6 points and 4.0 rebounds in the Big 12.

  • Shepherd has made just 38.8% of his shot attempts this season, but leads the team with 6.0 rebounds a game.

  • Had only 2 points and 3 rebounds against Oklahoma, which came after one of his best games in a month — 13 points and 6 rebounds vs. Tennessee.

  • Tied a season high with 3 blocks vs. Texas.

No. 2 — G Michael Williams | 6-2, 195, jr.

— Jan. 16 at KU: 13 points, 6/9 FGs, 1/1 FTs, 4 rebounds, 1 assist, 1 turnover in 36 minutes as a starter

  • Like Shepherd, junior Michael Williams has both started and played a substitute role for TCU. He averages 4.9 points vs. Big 12 competition and a team-best 2.7 assists a game.

  • Scored his season-high 13 points against Kansas.

  • Dished 5 or more assists in 7 games this year, including 8 at Baylor.

  • Has hit just 11 of his 45 attempts from 3-point range (24.4%) this season.

No. 15 — F J.D. Miller | 6-8, 235, fr.

— Jan. 16 at KU: 6 points, 3/12 FGs, 0/1 3s, 4 rebounds, 1 turnover, 1 steal in 25 minutes off the bench

  • A high-volume shot-taker, freshman J.D. Miller mostly has been off in Big 12 play, averaging 5.7 points on 32.8% shooting.

  • Had a career-high 12 rebounds against Washington and blocked 5 shots vs. SE Louisiana.

  • Second on the team, with 6 dunks this season.

  • Shooting just 36.3% from the floor (41 of 113) in his first year of college hoops.

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Dueling Dukes sing-off puts local men in the spotlight for Theatre Lawrence

More than a quarter century has passed since Jason Edmonds and Matt All last shared the stage together, when the two then-students tied for the big prize (it was something along the lines of “best male vocalist” or “best male performer,” though neither can remember for certain) at Kansas University’s annual Rock Chalk Revue.

Trouble was, only one trophy had been made. The young men “jokingly” engaged in a tug of war for a few brief seconds, but then All grabbed hold of the trophy and that was that.

“I never let go of the trophy and still have it today,” says All, who has found himself drawn into competition with his former classmate again, this time at Theatre Lawrence’s sold-out Dueling Dukes, slated for 7:30 p.m. Saturday. “I should probably give it to him and let him have it for another 25, 30 years,” he jokes.

Edmonds and All are among the eight Lawrence-area men selected to battle it out, “American Idol”-style, in the twist on Theatre Lawrence’s popular Dueling Divas event, which in previous years has enlisted local women to perform in support of the community theater.

Matt All, front right, grabs the arm of Jason Edmonds to push him out of the way as they perform during a dress rehearsal for the upcoming Dueling Dukes on Thursday evening at Theatre Lawrence, 4660 Bauer Farm Drive. The benefit show runs on Feb. 6, 2016 at the theater.

Matt All, front right, grabs the arm of Jason Edmonds to push him out of the way as they perform during a dress rehearsal for the upcoming Dueling Dukes on Thursday evening at Theatre Lawrence, 4660 Bauer Farm Drive. The benefit show runs on Feb. 6, 2016 at the theater. by John Young

The basic premise is the same this time around.

Each contestant sings two songs, in addition to a group number, and the audience members vote for their favorites. Each vote equals a dollar donated to Theatre Lawrence. Folks can also pledge support before the performance at www.theatrelawrence.com.

The evening begins at 6:30 with an hors d'oeuvre buffet, wine and cocktails, with the "dukes" taking the stage at 7:30.

“We just wanted to shake it up a bit,” Kay Traver, Theatre Lawrence marketing director, says of the gender switch.

“We try to choose contestants, some who are closely tied to the theater but also some who are community members who the general public may not realize have singing talent,” she says. “It’s always nice to see your friends and community members strut their stuff.”

Edmonds, 46, and All, 44, did their fair share of musical theater growing up. Though, with the exception of the occasional wedding and funeral over the years, it’s been decades since they sung for an audience of Theatre Lawrence proportions. Family, career and the general obligations of adulthood put performing on the back burner.

“I’m mostly excited about it,” says Matt All, now senior vice president and general counsel at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas, of his return to the stage. “With occasional fits of wanting to vomit,” he deadpans.

Nerves aside, he and Edmonds both say they’ve enjoyed the experience so far. Theatre Lawrence’s musical director, Mary Baker, is providing musical accompaniment and direction, but the competition largely leaves contestants to decide how much time and effort to put into the show. Aside from a handful of “formal” rehearsals since October, Edmonds says his preparation has mainly been limited to singing in the car. (He does it every day, though.)

“It’s hardly competition. We’re all genuinely having fun,” says Edmonds, a founder and partner at Lawrence’s Edmonds Duncan Registered Investment Advisors. “It’s a much more talented group of guys — I am the rank amateur of the group, as much as I’m looking forward to it.”

He’d like to win Dueling Dukes, of course, but Edmonds has his eye on another prize too: the much-coveted Rock Chalk Revue trophy from all those years ago. Edmonds says he has instructed his old friend to bring the award to Theatre Lawrence on the night of the show.

“I met my wife (Michaela Edmonds) that year,” he concedes of the Rock Chalk Revue snub. “There are three young people who have that silly show to thank for their lives, I guess.”

Still, Edmonds says, good naturedly, “I think it’s my turn to keep the trophy, Matt.”

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KU Sports Extra: Bad signs and good signings

Tom Keegan and Matt Tait examine an eventful week for Kansas athletics, which included basketball coach Bill Self calling out junior Brannen Greene for his antics and Kansas football coach David Beaty bringing in his second recruiting class.

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Lawrence Libations: The Lieutenant Dan at Java Break

If my Twitter feed is any indication, award season is upon us, with the king of award shows, the Oscars, slated for Feb. 28.

So, in honor of Hollywood’s big night, we thought it only appropriate to highlight 1995’s Best Picture winner — and the creativity of the folks at Java Break — with this month’s Lawrence Libations: the Lieutenant Dan.

The Lieutenant Dan at Java Break, 17 E. Seventh St.

The Lieutenant Dan at Java Break, 17 E. Seventh St. by Joanna Hlavacek

If you’re having a hard time picturing Gary Sinises’s prickly Vietnam vet downing one of Java Break’s sugary lattes, it’s probably because the drink, like several others on the coffee shop’s menu, is actually named for a former Java Break employee. Manager Brandi Bradfield isn’t sure of the details, but knows his name was Dan and that he was, in fact, a lieutenant in some unspecified branch of the military.

We’re guessing he must have been a super sweet guy or — in a nod to the “Forrest Gump” character of the same name — so abrasive that his coworkers decided to honor him with an ironically sweet blend of espresso, caramel and house-made chocolate and vanilla syrups. Oh, and a heaping swirl of whipped cream (we went with chocolate) on top.

Either way, his namesake latte lives on.

Order yours hot, or go with Bradfield’s suggestion and get it iced, like we did.

The hard stuff: No alcohol in this one

Where it’s served: Java Break, 17 E. Seventh St.

What you’ll pay: $4.05 for a regular-sized portion

Other libations at this location: Plenty of coffee options, from the standard (cappuccino, et al) to more Java Break originals like the cinnamon-laced Sarina’s Sin-a-Bun and the minty Jenny’s Julep. For the coffee-averse, Java Break offers hot chocolate, house-made chai and other tea options, plus several varieties of Italian soda.

— Drink up. Stay classy. Don’t forget to tip your bartender. And let us know if you want to suggest a libation for this feature — email jhlavacek@ljworld.com or Tweet her at Twitter.com/hlavacekjoanna. Cheers.

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Highlight reel: Kansas defeats rival Kansas State

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Baseline view: Kansas beats K-State

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Mardi Gras parade set for Tuesday

Time to bust out the beads, baubles and general "freaky" attire, Lawrencians. The 10th annual Mardi Gras parade returns Tuesday, with local musician Mike West and his family again at the helm.

The fun starts about 11:30 a.m., when folks are invited to gather in front of Aimee's Coffee House, 1025 Massachusetts St., before continuing north on the street beginning at noon.

The whole thing — which usually draws between 100 and 300 people, including spectators who join in as the parade meanders in and out of downtown businesses — should last no longer than two hours, West says, before ending at Free State Brewing Co., 636 Massachusetts St.

Don't forget to dress up and bring musical instruments if you've got them, West says. Even if you don't know how to play, noise-making is encouraged.

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Get to know competitive K-State before Sunflower Showdown

Kansas State head coach Bruce Weber gets heated during the first half, Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 at Bramlage Coliseum.

Kansas State head coach Bruce Weber gets heated during the first half, Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 at Bramlage Coliseum. by Nick Krug

Not many people around the Big 12 expected much out of Bruce Weber’s Wildcats this season. The league’s coaches picked Kansas State to finish tied for eighth (with TCU) in the preseason poll.

Almost midway through the conference schedule, K-State (13-8 overall, 2-6 Big 12) isn’t blowing people away. The Wildcats enter Wednesday night’s Sunflower Showdown at Allen Fieldhouse tied for seventh place, with Texas Tech.

While it wouldn’t be accurate to characterize a team four games below .500 in the league as good, a close look at the Wildcats’ results reveals it’s not really fair to say they’re bad, either.

K-State losses, with current kenpom.com ranking of opponent:

- Nov. 24: No. 4 North Carolina, 80-70, at Sprint Center

- Dec. 12: No. 8 Texas A&M, 78-68, in Wichita

- Jan. 2: No. 10 West Virginia, 87-83 2OT

- Jan. 5: at No. 27 Texas, 60-57

- Jan. 9: at No. 1 Oklahoma, 86-76

- Jan. 16: No. 14 Iowa State, 76-63

- Jan. 20: at No. 29 Baylor, 79-72 2OT

- Jan. 26: at No. 10 West Virginia, 70-55

Outside of the 13-point home loss to Iowa State and the 15-point loss in Morgantown, W. Va., K-State (ranked No. 44 in the nation by college hoops math wizard Ken Pomeroy) has played within 10 points or better of some legitimate competition. If the season ended today, every team that beat the Wildcats would easily qualify for the NCAA Tournament.

It is much more difficult to find an impressive victory on Kansas State’s résumé at this point — No. 56 Texas Tech, No. 64 Oklahoma State and No. 80 Georgia qualify as the best three. But it is clear Weber’s players are no pushovers.

Meet the Wildcats the Kansas Jayhawks (17-4, 5-3) will have to shut down in order to keep pace with the rest of the Big 12 in the standings.

KANSAS STATE STARTERS

No. 25 — G/F Wesley Iwundu | 6-7, 210, jr.

Kansas State's Wesley Iwundu gets a rebound during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa State Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Kansas State's Wesley Iwundu gets a rebound during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa State Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • One of the more recognizable Wildcats on a relatively young team, junior Wesley Iwundu leads K-State in scoring (12.2 points per game) and has put up double figures 16 times this season.

  • Iwundu is also one of the team’s better passers (3.0 assists), rebounders (4.9) and defenders (1.0 steals).

  • Averaging 10.9 points in Big 12 games and shooting 45.6%, Iwundu’s 17 points vs. Texas Tech marked his most ever in a league contest.

  • At Baylor, Iwundu came within 3 assists of pulling off a triple-double: 10 points, 10 boards, 7 assists in 45 minutes.

  • Iwundu leads K-State with 79 field goals at the rim, per hoop-math.com. He converts 68.1% of his looks on layups/dunks.

  • Has only hit 2 of 16 attempts from 3-point range (12.5%).

  • Iwundu takes more free throws than any of his teammates, but only shoots 66.3% at the line.

No. 14 — G Justin Edwards | 6-4, 200, sr.

Kansas State guard Justin Edwards (14) shoots in front of Oklahoma forward Khadeem Lattin (12) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016. Oklahoma won 86-76. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Kansas State guard Justin Edwards (14) shoots in front of Oklahoma forward Khadeem Lattin (12) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016. Oklahoma won 86-76. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

  • Senior Justin Edwards’ 1.9 steals a game lead K-State, and he also contributes 11.9 points, 5.5 rebounds and a team-leading 3.05 assists (1 more dish on the season than Iwundu).

  • In 7 Big 12 games, Edwards has swiped 2 or more steals. He left Oklahoma with 5 takeaways.

  • A better 3-point shooter than fellow vet Iwundu, Edwards isn’t that great, either. Has made 19 from deep on 67 tries (28.4%).

  • Although he plays on the perimeter, Edwards makes a point to get the ball to the paint, and ranks 2nd among Wildcats in field goals at the rim (57). He scores on 60.6% of his layups/dunks.

  • Posted his first career double-double, with 13 points and 10 boards at Texas.

  • K-State tracks hustle plays on its “Play Hard Chart,” which rewards Wildcats for defections, blocks, steals, dives, loose balls, offensive rebounds and charges. Edwards leads the team with 179 play-hard points.

  • Edwards’ 49 offensive boards rank second on the team.

No. 32 — F Dean Wade | 6-10, 225, fr.

None by K-State Athletics

  • A first-year big man from St. John, Kansas, Dean Wade has acclimated well to college basketball, and averages 10.1 points and 5.9 rebounds for K-State.

  • The 6-10 freshman leads the Wildcats with 52 offensive boards, which he has turned into a team-leading 23 put-backs.

  • Wade is K-State’s best finisher at the rim, making 75.4% of his attempts…

  • … But he can be coaxed into taking 2-point jumpers (13 of 59, 22%) or 3-pointers (14 of 52, 26.9%).

  • Wade is the only true freshman to rank among the top 20 in Big 12 rebounding, as well as the only one in the league to start every game this season.

  • Hit the game-winning jumper with 4.3 seconds left at Georgia, when he scored 16 of his team-high 17 points in the second half.

No. 3 — G Kamau Stokes | 6-0, 170, fr.

None by Bring On The Cats

  • Listed as questionable for the game at KU, freshman guard Kamau Stokes (9.4 points per game) also has caught on quickly at K-State.

  • The Wildcats need Stokes to help stretch opposing defenses. The young, small guard leads the team with 35 made 3-pointers and shoots 34% from deep.

  • Stokes scored a career-high 24 points against UNC and made 6 of 8 from 3-point range.

  • Hit 3 of 6 from deep and scored 20 points at Baylor.

No. 41 — F Stephen Hurt | 6-11, 265, sr.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander (2) battles to get off a shot against Kansas State forward Stephen Hurt (41) during the first half on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Cliff Alexander (2) battles to get off a shot against Kansas State forward Stephen Hurt (41) during the first half on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

  • The largest man on K-State’s roster, senior Stephen Hurt averages 6.7 points and 4.4 rebounds in 20.0 minutes.

  • However, Hurt doesn’t block many shots (6 this season), get many offensive rebounds (18 in 420 minutes) or shoot a good percentage for a big man (40.3%).

  • Hurt only shoots 53.6% at the rim and has made more 2-point jumpers (23) than layups/dunks (15) this season.

  • Hurt’s numbers have dipped in Big 12 play: 5.6 points, 3.3 rebounds.

  • Hurt will take 3-pointers, but like some of his teammates, he isn’t that dependable: 10 of 36 (27.8%).

KANSAS STATE BENCH

No. 5 — G Barry Brown | 6-3, 195, fr.

None by Big 12 Conference

  • Looking exclusively at Big 12 games, freshman backup Barry Brown leads K-State in scoring, at 11.5 points per game.

  • Since the start of league play, the young guard is shooting 40.2% and logging 25.8 minutes.

  • If Stokes can’t go, look for Brown to step up in the shooting department. With 26 3-pointers this season, he ranks second on the team. Brown has made 34.2% from deep, which leads K-State.

  • Brown’s 23 steals rank 2nd on the team.

No. 4 — F D.J. Johnson | 6-9, 250, jr.

None by K-State Athletics

  • A Wildcat to watch out for on the offensive glass, junior D.J. Johnson averages 2.2 offensive rebounds a game and 4.7 overall in just 18.9 minutes.

  • Johnson’s 22 put-backs rank 2nd on the team and he’s an effective scorer at the rim: 73% shooting on layup/dunk attempts.

  • In K-State’s win over Ole Miss in the Big 12/SEC Challenge, Johnson became the sixth different player to lead the team in scoring this season, with 14 points, and also led the Wildcats with 7 boards.

  • Johnson broke his foot against Kentucky in the 2014 NCAA Tournament and missed the 2014-15 season.

  • Averaging 7.2 points in his comeback year, Johnson’s numbers have improved in his past 7 games: 9.3 points, 5.3 rebounds, 63.9% shooting in 21.7 minutes.

  • The team’s best rim protector, Johnson has 16 blocked shots. Nine of those have come in Big 12 play.

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Devonté Graham discusses KU’s zone defense

Kansas sophomore guard Devonté Graham says the Jayhawks have enough time to recover physically and mentally from their overtime victory against Kentucky before returning to Big 12 play to take on Kansas State Wednesday at Allen Fieldhouse.

Plus, Graham explains why the Jayhawks told coach Bill Self during the UK game they didn’t want to play a 2-3 zone defense in the half court.

“I wouldn’t say we’re that comfortable. We’re not used to playing zone,” Graham says. “… We’re used to just matching up with our man.”

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Baseline view: Kansas beats Kentucky, 90-84

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Highlight reel: Kansas defeats Kentucky in overtime

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‘Jay’s Dinner’ to honor late Hank Charcuterie chef Juan Carlos Tovar-Ballagh, benefit Just Food

When Hank Charcuterie chef de cuisine Juan Carlos Tovar-Ballagh passed away last November, he left behind a small library of notebooks brimming with recipe ideas that he would never make.

“Jay,” the quietly ambitious, imaginative young man who started his culinary career as a line cook at Pachamamas and later helped transform Hank Charcuterie from a small artisanal butcher shop into a “full-fledged restaurant,” was just 27.

On Thursday, a group of Tovar-Ballagh’s friends and colleagues will finally bring some of his notebook musings to life in “Jay’s Dinner,” a six-course meal benefiting Just Food.

Hank Charcuterie chef de cuisine Juan Carlos 'Jay' Tovar-Ballagh, pictured in this 2011 Journal-World photo at the former Pachamamas kitchen, died last November at 27, leaving behind several notebooks of recipe ideas. "Jay's Dinner," a six-course meal inspired by his notes, will take place Thursday at Sarah's Upstairs, 927 1/2 Massachusetts St., benefitting Just Food.

Hank Charcuterie chef de cuisine Juan Carlos 'Jay' Tovar-Ballagh, pictured in this 2011 Journal-World photo at the former Pachamamas kitchen, died last November at 27, leaving behind several notebooks of recipe ideas. "Jay's Dinner," a six-course meal inspired by his notes, will take place Thursday at Sarah's Upstairs, 927 1/2 Massachusetts St., benefitting Just Food.

Slated for 6:30 p.m. at Sarah’s Upstairs, 927 ½ Massachusetts St., the event will feature several high-profile members of the Lawrence dining scene, including Ken Baker and Brian Strecker of the now-closed Pachamamas, Rick Martin of Limestone Pizza Kitchen and Bar, Zach Thompson of 715, and Vaughn Good and Jamie Everett of Hank Charcuterie.

“We took our dish and tried to make it as close to what we thought Jay would do,” says Good, chef-owner of Hank Charcuterie. “How he would plate it, how he would cook it.”

The resulting menu includes such delicacies as beer-brined chicken confit and kimchi-wrapped beef neck dumplings.

Despite his late friend’s introverted nature, Good suspects Tovar-Ballagh wouldn’t have minded the big, fancy dinner in his name — “I think he’d like it,” Good says. After his death last year, the Tovar-Ballagh family asked that, in lieu of flowers, donations be made to Just Food.

“Jay was an insanely creative person,” Good says. “He had a ton of thoughts and ideas that he just didn’t get to do yet, and I think that was the best way that we could remember Jay or pay tribute to him — to let some of these things come to life that he didn’t get to do.”

Tickets to “Jay’s Dinner” cost $75, or $45 for those who work in the restaurant industry, and can be purchased at www.justfoodks.org/jaysdinner.

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Kentucky might be hitting stride just in time for trip to Kansas

Kentucky head coach John Calipari yells at his players during the first half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

Kentucky head coach John Calipari yells at his players during the first half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. by Nick Krug

The hype for Kansas versus Kentucky might not be quite as deafening as college basketball fans hoped when the Big 12/SEC Challenge matchup was announced. Both teams aren’t currently ranked in the top five, like they were in the preseason polls. But that doesn’t mean Saturday night’s showdown (6 p.m., ESPN) between No. 4 Kansas and No. 20 Kentucky should be any less intense.

Kentucky (16-4 overall, 6-2 SEC), in fact, actually might be hitting its stride. Following a disappointing loss at Auburn on Jan. 16, coach John Calipari said the Wildcats responded in their next three games — a road win at Arkansas, and home routs of Vanderbilt and Missouri.

“We’re finally starting to become a team where I’m like, ‘OK, it looks like somebody I coach,’” Calipari said.

During the past 3 games, UK is averaging 81.3 points, giving up only 59.0 points, shooting 49.7% and holding opponents to 34.6%. On 3-point shots, Kentucky is making 36.4% and limiting foes to 26.8%.

“We’re beginning to have a swagger, because we’re guarding,” Calipari said.

Rebounding will be key for the Wildcats, too, at Kansas (16-4 overall, 5-3 Big 12). Kentucky averages a +10.0 rebound margin in wins this season, and is -1.8 in losses.

And, of course, if you recall the UK block party that broke out the last time these two programs met, early in the 2014-15 season, defending the rim will have plenty to do with UK’s chances of winning in Allen Fieldhouse. The Wildcats steamrolled KU, 72-40, in Indianapolis, blocking 11 shots in the process.

This season, with a different roster, Kentucky is swatting 6.3 shots a game in wins, and only 3.8 in losses.

No, UK doesn’t have the kind of devastating team it has in past years under Calipari, with future NBA All-Stars such as Anthony Davis, DeMarcus Cousins or (eventual all-star) Karl-Anthony Towns. But according to DraftExpress.com, there are five soon-to-be NBA draft picks on the Kentucky roster.

(The site also projects three Jayhawks in the upcoming June draft: Cheick Diallo 21st, Svi Mykhailiuk 25th, Wayne Selden Jr. 55th.)

For a non-conference, regular-season game in late January, Calipari might have said it best:

“This will be a war.”

Meet the Wildcats the Jayhawks have to worry about Saturday night, when KU (2,169 wins) will try to get a little closer to college basketball’s all-time winningest program, Kentucky (2,194).

KENTUCKY STARTERS

No. 23 — G Jamal Murray | 6-4, 207, fr.

Kentucky guard Jamal Murray, right, moves the ball as UCLA guard Isaac Hamilton defends during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015. UCLA won 87-77. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

Kentucky guard Jamal Murray, right, moves the ball as UCLA guard Isaac Hamilton defends during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015. UCLA won 87-77. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

- No. 9 pick in 2016 NBA Draft, according to DraftExpress.com

  • The most deadly 3-point shooter in the building on Saturday night might be freshman Jamal Murray (17.5 points per game), who has made 53 of 140 from downtown this season (37.9%).

  • The reigning SEC Freshman of the Week (18.5 points and 7.0 rebounds in two wins) has made at least one 3-pointer in every game this season. Murray averages 2.7 successful 3-pointers a game.

  • Scored 33 points (27 in the second half) vs. Ohio State, the 2nd-highest individual total in the Calipari era. Murray drilled 7 from 3-point range in the loss.

  • Murray is tied for the team lead with 25 steals this season, and ranks 3rd among UK players in offensive rebounds, with 30.

No. 3 — PG Tyler Ulis | 5-9, 160, soph.

Kentucky's Tyler Ulis, right, shoots around Arkansas' Trey Thompson (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, in Fayetteville, Ark. Kentucky won 80-66. (AP Photo/Samantha Baker)

Kentucky's Tyler Ulis, right, shoots around Arkansas' Trey Thompson (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, in Fayetteville, Ark. Kentucky won 80-66. (AP Photo/Samantha Baker)

- No. 47 pick in 2016 NBA Draft, according to DraftExpress.com

  • Kentucky’s offense runs through the capable hands of sophomore point guard Tyler Ulis (15.5 points, 6.1 assists), who rarely comes off the floor (35.8 minutes). According to Calipari, Ulis is one of the best floor generals he has ever coached.

  • Ullis, like Murray, has 25 steals. Unlike Murray, he’s not quite as dangerous from 3-point range: 27 of 88 (30.7%).

  • Still, Ulis has put up 20 or more points in 7 of the last 9 games for UK — including each of the past 3 wins.

  • In Kentucky’s easy defeat of Missouri, Ulis became the first Wildcat with at least 4 assists in 13 straight games since Sean Woods did it in the 1990-91 season.

  • Some guys spend too much time taking 2-point jumpers. Ulis isn’t one of them. He shoots 48.8% on shots inside the arc that don’t come at the rim. He has made 44 of 91 2-point jumpers, per hoop-math.com.

No. 22 — F Alex Poythress | 6-8, 230, sr.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) watches as Kentucky forward Alex Poythress (22) rejects his floater during the second half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) watches as Kentucky forward Alex Poythress (22) rejects his floater during the second half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. by Nick Krug

  • The old man of the bunch, senior Alex Poythress was a McDonald’s All-American in 2012, and already has a degree in business marketing. Poythress tore an ACL in December of 2014, perhaps prolonging his college career, but has played well this season for UK.

  • Poythress is averaging 9.7 points and a team-best 6.6 rebounds a game, but Calipari thinks he is capable of even more, as UK tries to peak in the weeks ahead: “We need Alex to keep taking strides, like keep getting better. Not be consistent — get better.”

  • The active veteran forward averages 2.1 offensive boards a game, is shooting 59% on the year and has made 56 baskets at the rim.

  • Scored a career-high 25 points at Alabama.

  • In UK victories, Poythress and Marcus Lee are combining for 14.1 rebounds per game. That number for the duo drops to 9.0 in losses.

No. 35 — F Derek Willis | 6-9, 220, jr.

Kentucky forward Derek Willis (35) dunks the ball against Auburn forward Horace Spencer (0) and forward Tyler Harris (12) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Auburn, Ala. Auburn won 75-70. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Kentucky forward Derek Willis (35) dunks the ball against Auburn forward Horace Spencer (0) and forward Tyler Harris (12) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Auburn, Ala. Auburn won 75-70. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

  • Junior Derek Willis just recently joined UK’s starting five, and is coming on of late. Willis averages 6.8 points and 3.8 boards on the year.

  • During the last 4 games, Willis is averaging 12.3 points and a team-leading 10.0 boards.

  • Willis dominated against Missouri, posting a new career high, with 18 points, as well as a game-high 12 rebounds.

  • In just his 2nd start of the season, Willis provided 12 points and 7 rebounds in UK’s win at Arkansas, where he also blocked a career-best 4 shots.

  • In his first 40 games for UK, Willis scored 77 total points. He has 94 points in his past 14 games.

  • By the way, Willis can shoot. He drilled 4 of 5 from 3-point range vs. Mizzou and has connected on 24 of 57 from deep this season (42.1%).

  • When opponents foul this big man, Willis makes them pay. He doesn’t get to the foul line a lot, but he has made 24 consecutive entering the game at KU. Willis has made all 16 of his free throws this season and has hit 31 of 34 (91.2%) in his career.

No. 13 — G Isaiah Briscoe | 6-3, 202, fr.

Kentucky's Isaiah Briscoe, middle, shoots between Arizona State's Gerry Blakes (4) and Eric Jacobsen during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015, in Lexington, Ky. Kentucky won 72-58. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

Kentucky's Isaiah Briscoe, middle, shoots between Arizona State's Gerry Blakes (4) and Eric Jacobsen during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015, in Lexington, Ky. Kentucky won 72-58. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

- No. 31 pick in 2016 NBA Draft, according to DraftExpress.com

  • A young guard who attacks the glass, freshman Isaiah Briscoe averages 5.3 rebounds and 10.2 points.

  • Briscoe shoots a high percentage overall (45.8%), despite taking too many 3-pointers (4 of 25, 16%).

  • The attacking guard has made 52 shots at the rim this season and has converted on 59.1% of his attempts inside.

  • A consensus top-15 recruit in the Class of 2015, Briscoe has produced some big games here and there for UK, including a 14-point/5-assist showing vs. Mississippi State.

  • Ripped 4 steals in a win over Ole Miss.

KENTUCKY BENCH

No. 00 — F Marcus Lee | 6-9, 224, jr.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) elevates to the bucket under the outstretched arm of Kentucky forward Marcus Lee (00) during the first half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) elevates to the bucket under the outstretched arm of Kentucky forward Marcus Lee (00) during the first half of the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. by Nick Krug

- No. 56 pick in 2016 NBA Draft, according to DraftExpress.com

  • This Kentucky front line might not be as imposing as those of other recent Calipari juggernauts, but junior substitute Marcus Lee does his share of defending the rim for UK. Lee leads the team with 1.8 blocks per game.

  • Lee spent most of the season as a starter, but now comes in off the bench. He averages 7.2 points and 6.5 rebounds, and does much of his damage on the offensive glass, leading to his team-leading 64.0% field goal percentage.

  • Lee averages a team-leading 2.9 offensive boards a game, and ranks first on the team with 23 put-backs.

  • Foul trouble vs. LSU and an injury vs. UCLA meant Lee only played a combined 9 minutes in those 2 games, and Kentucky lost both of them.

  • In Kentucky victories, Lee averages 7.9 points, 7.1 rebounds, 1.9 blocks and shoots 66.7% …

  • … But in losses, Lee has put up just 3.8 points, 4.3 rebounds, 1.0 blocks and shot 46.2% from the field.

No. 1 — F Skal Labissiere | 6-11, 225, fr.

Duke center Marshall Plumlee snags a rebound over Kentucky forward Skal Labissiere (1) during the first half of an NCAA basketball game, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Duke center Marshall Plumlee snags a rebound over Kentucky forward Skal Labissiere (1) during the first half of an NCAA basketball game, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

- No. 6 overall pick in 2016 NBA Draft, according to DraftExpress.com

  • If you think about it, freshman big Skal Labissiere is Kentucky’s version of (a more succesful) Cheick Diallo. Labissiere projects as his team’s best future pro, but hasn’t caught up with the speed of the college game enough to garner major playing time.

  • Perhaps a lottery pick in June, Labissiere currently averages 7.7 points and a truly disappointing 2.9 rebounds in 17.3 minutes a game.

  • Labissiere does block some shots inside, though: 1.7 a game.

  • Against an overmatched Mizzou team, Labissiere scored 12 points and swatted 5 shots, a new career high.

  • Picked by the media to the preseason All-SEC first team, Labissiere started the first 11 games of the season, but has come off the bench since late December. The 6-11 freshman played single-digit minutes in recent league games against Alabama, Auburn and Vanderbilt.

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Female-led ‘Women in the Field’ dinner to benefit Sunrise Project

A handful of female chefs and restaurateurs are teaming up for a night of dinner, dancing and entertainment to benefit the Sunrise Project next month at Abe & Jake’s Landing, 8 E. Sixth St.

“Women in the Field,” slated for Feb. 18 from 6:30 to 10 p.m., will feature the culinary talents of Meg Heriford of Ladybird Diner, Melinda Roeder of Café Beautiful, Hilary Brown of the now-closed Local Burger, Raven Naramore of Raven’s Table Catering and Bubbly Love Ferments; caterer Kendra Marable; Layla McEniry of Layla’s Got Sweetcakes; and Cait Curtis of Terrebonne Café.

The women will prepare a six-course meal, including drinks, benefiting the Sunrise Project, a Lawrence nonprofit that provides community cooking and gardening programs.

Tickets are $100 and can be purchased at www.sunriseprojectks.org or by sending checks to Sunrise Project at P.O. Box 1454, Lawrence KS 66044 (write “Women in the Field” in the memo line).

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Landen Lucas: KU-UK not true rematch, but Jayhawks looking for redemption

Kansas junior forward Landen Lucas says the Jayhawks remember well how poorly they played against Kentucky, early in the 2014-15 season.

“There’s not a ton that needs to be said,” Lucas adds.

When asked to describe the mood of the locker room after that drubbing, Lucas recalls it was terrible.

“That was by far the worst loss that I’ve been a part of here at Kansas, and that rarely happens,” Lucas shares “… It’s awesome that we get to play them again this year… I know it’s not the same team, but it’s still Kentucky.”

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Percolator’s ‘Group Love’ show to open Friday

“Group Love,” the Lawrence Percolator’s fourth installment of its annual amore-themed exhibit, opens Friday — just in time for Valentine’s Day, conveniently enough.

But the show isn’t merely a valentine to romance. Love of all kinds — love for family members, friends, for one’s self — is celebrated in the multimedia effort, says Percolator board member and exhibiting artist Rachael Perry.

This year’s work — the exhibit is open to artists of all ages and skill levels — includes everything from painting and printmaking to mixed-media sculptures and assemblages made with found objects.

Lawrence artist Karen Eager created a iron face, seen here, for the Lawrence Percolator's annual love-themed art show, this year titled "Group Love." The exhibit opens Friday with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St.

Lawrence artist Karen Eager created a iron face, seen here, for the Lawrence Percolator's annual love-themed art show, this year titled "Group Love." The exhibit opens Friday with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St. by Richard Gwin

“The pieces are really diverse and really fun this year,” she says. “People are really looking at love in all its complexity and not just through one single lens.”

Perry, whose Lawrence Inside Out project saw the installation of hundreds of black-and-white photographic portraits around the city in 2015, has fashioned a collage out of old photos she discovered in the dumpster behind the Social Service League, 905 Rhode Island St., which is near the Percolator.

Comprising mostly professional and amateur snapshots of children from 1950s-era Garnett, the photographs portrayed kids in class portraits and dressed up with friends on Halloween.

“It reminded me of how it felt to be in elementary school,” Perry says of her creation. “You have this whole dynamic of group love and group hate and all the social aspects of being alive when you’re that age.”

Lawrence artist Liza MacKinnon created a 3-foot-tall, papier-mache human heart for the Lawrence Percolator's new show "Group Love," which encourages artists to explore the theme of love. The show opens Friday at the Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St.

Lawrence artist Liza MacKinnon created a 3-foot-tall, papier-mache human heart for the Lawrence Percolator's new show "Group Love," which encourages artists to explore the theme of love. The show opens Friday at the Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St. by Richard Gwin

This year marks Liza MacKinnon’s third showing at the Percolator’s love exhibit.

A sort of artistic jack-of-all-trades, MacKinnon works in a variety of mediums, including printmaking, painting, textiles and ceramics. But she’s never done anything — at least not with papier-mache — on the same scale as her “Group Love” submission, a 3-foot-tall, anatomically correct replica of a human heart covered in pages taken from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM.

Alternatively titled “My Lumpy Heart,” “A Broken Heart is a Beating Heart,” and “Love Letter to Bert Nash,” the papier-mache sculpture pays tribute to the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center, where MacKinnon has been a client for nearly all of her eight years in Lawrence.

Collages by Candice Davis hang at the Lawrence Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St. The Percolator's annual love-themed art show, "Group Love," opens Friday.

Collages by Candice Davis hang at the Lawrence Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St. The Percolator's annual love-themed art show, "Group Love," opens Friday. by Richard Gwin

She credits the facility’s dialectical behavioral therapy program (the approach is geared toward recognizing and ultimately regulating harmful behavior, such as self-harm, substance abuse and suicidal thinking) with helping her “navigate the world better.”

“The people who work there, even the bookkeepers and receptionists, I feel like they go above and beyond taking care of humanity. They’re spreading love outward,” MacKinnon says. “They do this for a living, but it’s more than just having a job.”

Between her teaching at the Lawrence Arts Center and a part-time gig at the Lawrence Public Library, MacKinnon’s schedule doesn’t leave much time for art shows. But honoring love — especially the compassion and empathy she’s experienced at Bert Nash — make the Percolator's show worthwhile.

“It’s hard to use language without sounding cliché,” she admits. “But, really, love and the way it’s expressed and the way people take care of each other…really, that’s the currency to be alive.”

“Group Love” runs through Feb. 21 at the Percolator, 913 Rhode Island St., with an opening reception slated for 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

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Carlton Bragg nearly chose UK, will face Wildcats Saturday

Kansas freshman forward Carlton Bragg, who nearly chose Kentucky when making his college decision (and accidentally said Kentucky at his announcement a year ago), is looking forward to facing the Wildcats on Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse.

According to Bragg, KU coach Bill Self told the Jayhawks this break from Big 12 play “can’t hurt us. All it can do is help us.”

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