Advertisement

LJWorld.com weblogs In Simple Words

The Old Windmill

Advertisement

A little over a hundred years ago, if you'd been driving...your horse and buggy...down 9th street out by Emery Rd, you might have seen something like this.

I found two links with information about the windmill, both articles are from the Journal World:

The picture was used in this article from earlier this year about the print room at the Spencer Museum of Art.

Back in 2004, there was this article about Lawrence landmarks.

Does anyone remember the Windmill apartments that used to be in that area? Now I know where the name came from.

Comments

max1 6 years, 3 months ago

"I wish there were on on-line repository for all (or at least many/most) of the historic pictures, maps, and charts related to this area." -dklamet

Here is a link to some photographs by Alexander Gardner, and many of them are of this area. http://www.kshs.org/research/collections/documents/online/westerntrails/ And here is a cool illustration from a book selling on e-bay: http://members.aol.com/roaringdam/beyo5a.jpg 1869 OLD WEST ANTIQUE FRONTIER EMIGRANT PIONEER GUIDE by Albert D. Richardson In 1857, he went to Kansas, and remained two years as Special Correspondent of The Boston Journal. On the discovery of Gold at Pike's Peak, in 1859, a great rush to that region instantly followed, founding the new State of Colorado in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. With characteristic love of adventure, Mr. Richardson, with Horace Greeley, visited the new mines in one of the first coaches that ever crossed the Great Plains, and joined in a report of their yield and prospects, which was published in every part of the Union

0

Ronda Miller 6 years, 3 months ago

Thanks for answering my question about size. How much do you figure it would cost to have one built these days? A cool home out on an acre or two of land - a couple of miniature horses. I like it!

0

David Klamet 6 years, 3 months ago

Excellent.
I wish there were on on-line repository for all (or at least many/most) of the historic pictures, maps, and charts related to this area.

0

max1 6 years, 4 months ago

"Are windmills large enough to live in?" -justbegintowrite

Well, if the Lawrence windmill was really 55' in diameter, the first-floor plan would be 2375 square feet (minus the thickness of the stonework), which is roughly the size of a 3 bedroom house, and that doesn't count the other levels within the mill, so the answer is defintely "yes", it was large enough for a whole family to live in. That windmill is shown on A. Rueger's 1869 panorama of Lawrence, Kansas. go to this link http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/pmhtml/panhome.html then click on "geographic location" then click on "Kansas" then click on "Lawrence, 1869" then click on the small picture then select the 4th button from the left between "zoom in" and "zoom out", and select the window size 640x480 then click on the windmill It appears that the center foreground is where the campanile is now located, so the windmill and old "North College Hall" (where Corbin is now) would be about equidistant from that point of perspective. North College Hall's foundation was 50' x 50', so maybe the windmill was a large as the guy from Watkins said it was.

0

max1 6 years, 4 months ago

"Are windmills large enough to live in?" -justbegintowrite

I find it hard to believe the Lawrence windmill was really 55' in diameter, but nonetheless it was bigger than this treehouse. http://www.danielswoodland.com/tree_houses/custom_tree_houses/haunted_hideout.php

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2004/oct... John Peterson, local historian and former volunteer at the [Douglas County] Watkins museum, said the eight-sided structure was about 55 feet in diameter.

http://www.wamego.org/dutchmil.htm Wamego stonemasons of English descent and skilled artisans, erected the stone tower from a soft, yellowish limestone quarried near the site. The structure was 40 feet high with a diameter of 25 feet at the base. Mr. Chadwick used native white limestone for the trim and for the sculptured bust of Ceres, goddess of grain.

0

Ronda Miller 6 years, 4 months ago

Absolutely beatiful pictures of this max1. Thank you. Are windmills large enough to live in?

0

max1 6 years, 4 months ago

Completed in late 1863; operated until July 31, 1885; burned to the ground April 30, 1905 http://abyss.kgs.ku.edu/pls/abyss/pubcat.phd1.View_Photo?f_id=8579&f_hd=Y

Built in 1879; operated until the late 1880s or early 1890s; moved to city park in 1924 http://abyss.kgs.ku.edu/pls/abyss/pubcat.phd1.View_Photo?f_id=2097&f_hd=Y

0

David Lignell 6 years, 4 months ago

I had a lot of stereotypes about Kansas when I first moved here, but having windmills wasn't among them. Interesting piece, Dave,

0

Ronda Miller 6 years, 4 months ago

What an interesting piece about this windmill. I read about it with interest since windmills happen to be one of my favorite things in the world - something about remembering the taste, cold and sweet, of the water from the one that badly needed oiling on the farm I grew up on.

The windmill was central to the farm yard buildings that surrounded it. It was central to life for all those around as well.

How interesting that the picture of the windmill was framed with some of the actual wood from the windmill.

Great!

0

Linda Hanney 6 years, 4 months ago

I am amazed how many historical structures are destroyed by fire. It would be interesting to know if any descendants of the original builder of the windmill are still located in Lawrence.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.