Posts tagged with Tim Caboni

KU’s official chancellor search web page is live, with contact info for submitting applications

Names of candidates for the next chancellor of the University of Kansas have already started coming in to search leaders, the search committee chairman said a few days ago.

I’ve even received a nomination myself, via Twitter:

None by Gern Blanston

If Barack Obama would like to apply, I can now direct him to an official KU web page instead. As of this week, chancellor.ku.edu/chancellor-search is set up for all things KU chancellor search — or, at least all official things KU chancellor search.

The page has a bit about the timeline and process, mailing and email addresses for a representative from the search firm of R. William Funk and Associates and a colorful “Prospectus” booklet to convince potential candidates that KU is a place they want to be. (Obama might like to lead an entity committed to “creating a better world” while situated in a city with a “progressive atmosphere, beautiful surroundings, and sense of fun,” right?)

What’s next? On Monday the search committee chairman, David Dillon, led the last of three planned campus open forums to collect feedback about what the KU community wants in its next chancellor. The committee will use feedback to draft a formal profile statement to be used in the job description and in evaluating candidates. Dillon says the soft application deadline is March 30 but that applications will be accepted until the job is filled.

Kansas University chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announces a $58 million gift from the estate of two late KU alumni, Madison 'Al' and Lila Self. The gift will go toward scholarships and fellowships for students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, business and economics. The donation brings the Selfs' donations to a total of $106 million, the most in university history.

Kansas University chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announces a $58 million gift from the estate of two late KU alumni, Madison 'Al' and Lila Self. The gift will go toward scholarships and fellowships for students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, business and economics. The donation brings the Selfs' donations to a total of $106 million, the most in university history. by Mike Yoder


A few other recent tidbits about KU administrators, past and present:

• In case you missed my previous story, KU vice chancellor for public affairs Tim Caboni has been named the preferred candidate to become the next president of Western Kentucky University. He’s scheduled to visit campus and be formally voted on later this week.

• A former KU dean will be the next chancellor of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. University of Tennessee Board of Trustees chose Beverly Davenport as the school’s first female chancellor, starting Feb. 15. Currently interim president at University of Cincinnati, Davenport was previously dean of social sciences at KU, according to Tennessee’s announcement.

• University of California Riverside Provost Paul J. D’Anieri recently resigned his post, facing a faculty vote of no confidence, the school’s student newspaper reported. He will remain on faculty. According to his UC bio, at KU D’Anieri was associate dean for international programs, director of the Center for Russian and European Studies and associate dean of humanities.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

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Cal State building named for former KU administrator; Jayhawk is Washington state poet laureate; chancellor’s husband as Santa; and other KU names in the news

Here are a few University of Kansas names in the news and some other recent updates:

• Cal State LA names building for former KU administrator: There’s a building at California State University, Los Angeles being named after a former KU associate vice chancellor for academic affairs.

James Rosser left KU and went on to become Cal State LA’s first black president, serving longer than any other president in Cal State LA’s history, 34 years, according to a Los Angeles Sentinel story. Wing B of the university’s Wallis Annenberg Integrated Sciences Complex will become the James M. Rosser Hall. 

• Rehearsal room named for revered music prof: At KU, there’s now a band rehearsal room named in honor of James Barnes, a professor of music theory and music composition who taught at KU 41 years before retiring in 2015. Murphy Hall 118 was dedicated this fall as the James Barnes Rehearsal Room. In order to name the room in Barnes’ honor, the School of Music and KU Endowment set a goal to raise $250,000 for KU band student scholarships and ended up bringing in more than $300,000, the music school recently reported.

• Caboni not headed south: KU vice chancellor for public affairs Tim Caboni was one of four candidates to become president of Valdosta State University, and he visited the palm-tree filled Georgia campus last month. Looks like Caboni will not be taking that job. Valdosta State announced last week that another finalist was recommended for the presidency, with a regents vote expected Friday.

• Washington poet laureate is KU alumnus: Tod Marshall is now the state of Washington’s poet laureate. A recent Yakima Herald article noted that Marshall is originally from Wichita and got his undergraduate and master’s degrees from Siena Heights University and Eastern Washington University, respectively, before earning a doctorate from KU.

• Does that Santa look familiar?: A Santa Claus with a striking resemblance to Shade Keys Little, husband of KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little, appeared Saturday at Van Go Inc.

Van Go executive director Lynne Green said Santa had something come up Saturday and asked Little, who serves on the Van Go board, to don the red suit for him and take requests from children at the event, designed to help promote Van Go's Adornment show and sale, open until Dec. 23 at 715 New Jersey St. Mrs. Claus apparently did not join him, but here’s a picture from Van Go’s Facebook page of Santa Shade with an adorable baby:


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

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Lilac tradition makes return to campus; update on KU leader in running for president’s position

Despite most of the old overgrown lilac bushes being torn out and replaced last summer, Kansas University’s iconic Lilac Lane won’t go a spring without blooms.

New bushes planted in September are in bloom their first season in the ground, as university landscapers had hoped when I talked to them last fall. The new bushes are small — on top of being young, the more than six dozen planted along the sidewalk are a dwarf variety. But between those and a handful of large, old bushes remaining closer to Fraser Hall, there are enough flowers that the scent of lilacs wafts through the air along the sidewalk.

A Kansas University student walks next to new lilac bushes in bloom behind Fraser Hall on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. While some old bushes near the building remain, the lilacs along Lilac Lane were torn out and replanted with dwarf varieties in fall 2015.

A Kansas University student walks next to new lilac bushes in bloom behind Fraser Hall on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. While some old bushes near the building remain, the lilacs along Lilac Lane were torn out and replanted with dwarf varieties in fall 2015. by Sara Shepherd

It’s fantastic, and definitely worth taking a walk in the next week or so while the bushes are still in bloom.

Considering the nearly 150-year history of Lilac Lane, it’s fun to think about how many generations of students, faculty and even chancellors — The Outlook, home to KU chancellors since 1939, lies at the end of Lilac Lane — have done the same thing this time of year.

Information on Lilac Lane in the National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for the KU Historic District.

Information on Lilac Lane in the National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for the KU Historic District. by Sara Shepherd

A few more recent campus updates to know about:

• Vice chancellor not hired at GSU: KU vice chancellor for public affairs Tim Caboni was a finalist to become president of Georgia Southern University, but it looks like he won’t be headed there. The University System of Georgia announced Wednesday that Jaimie Hebert of Sam Houston State University would be Georgia Southern’s new president.

• Ecology and evolutionary biology professor dies: A KU professor known for his work in aquatic ecology, biofuels and the ecology of infectious diseases died last week. Val Smith, 65, a professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology, died April 2 at his home in Lawrence, according to KU.

“I join the University of Kansas community in mourning the death of Professor Val Smith, whose teaching and research contributed significantly to his field and helped elevate the reputation of the university and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology,” KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said in a statement from the university.

Visitation is planned for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, 120 W. 13th St., according to Smith's obituary.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage here. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

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KU budget deleted scenes: school-by-school cuts and a possible hours reduction at Watson Library

Over the weekend, we updated you on how KU is dealing with, and worrying about, its state funding cuts this year. These two bits didn't quite fit in that story, but they might be interesting for folks on the hill:

• If you read the story, you saw that the KU administration told the different academic units on the Lawrence campus to cut their budgets by varying percentages.

Tim Caboni, KU's vice chancellor for public affairs, told me the higher-ups determined the percentages based on the different schools' research productivity and on whether their enrollment was growing or declining. (Research was the bigger part of the equation, accounting for two-thirds of the calculation.)

The better each school was doing in those areas, Caboni said, the smaller the cut it received (at least by percentage). He said the administration did it this way to preserve what it considers most important, and that leaders hope it will serve as a "motivator" for schools to improve in those areas.

Anyway, because of all that, it might be interesting to see the full list of percentage cuts by school. Here you go, starting with the highest:

-School of Journalism: 0.97 percent

-School of Music: 0.89 percent

-School of Business: 0.87 percent

-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: 0.84 percent

-School of Social Welfare: 0.82 percent

-School of Architecture, Design and Planning: 0.72 percent

-School of Pharmacy: 0.69 percent

-School of Education: 0.6 percent

-School of Law: 0.45 percent

-School of Engineering: 0.4 percent

• One academic unit I left out of that list was the KU Libraries, because I'm giving it its own little section here. The libraries' cut was the same by percentage as the CLAS, 0.84 percent, and because of their sizable budget, they had one of the biggest cuts in terms of dollar amounts, at more than $100,000. (The College's cut, about $900,000, would dwarf all others on that list.)

I was curious how a cut like that might affect the libraries. The most noticeable effect for a lot of folks on campus could be a reduction in hours at KU's second most popular library, Watson Library.

Rebecca Smith, an executive director for the libraries, said leaders were considering closing Watson at midnight each weeknight instead of 3 a.m., allowing for a staff reduction. So if that's your go-to late-night study spot, you may have to find a new one. They haven't made a final decision on that, though.

The main way the libraries will deal with the cuts is to leave some vacant positions unfilled, Smith said. That means there will be fewer librarians available to do things like training students on research, helping faculty gather information and archiving KU research. (Smith noted that an academic library these days is far from just a "book depository.")

To me, anyway, the ways that this year's budget cuts will show up in the lives of people on campus are more interesting than percentages or dollar amounts, so let us know if you see a way that's happening. And get those KU news tips to merickson@ljworld.com.

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