Posts tagged with Ku

Here’s what KU’s new Central District student union and science building will look like

With this post, I think I now will have shared with you at some point or another images of all the main new buildings that are up or will go up in Kansas University’s Central District, and around the perimeter of it.

The latest images, which I requested from KU Memorial Unions, are of the new Central District student union and next-door integrated science building. They will be constructed just west of where the Burge Union stood; the 280,000-square-foot science building will be on Irving Hill Road, with the 30,000-square-foot union between it and Anschutz Sports Pavilion. They’re slated for completion in summer 2018, in time to open for fall 2018 classes.

One observation about the look of the Central District: A lot of new buildings going up at once it is, architectural variety it isn’t.

Not that I actually expected any stone buildings with grotesques, owls and relief sculpture — à la Dyche, Spooner and Twente halls in KU’s historic district along Jayhawk Boulevard. (I wonder how much it would cost to duplicate a building like Dyche these days, assuming you could even find capable stone carvers? Hey, we old building nerds can always daydream about them making a comeback.)

But while the new buildings may not feature the artistry and variety of the buildings up on the Hill, the Central District’s modern, boxy and glass-heavy style does offer a major benefit those older ones do not: lots of natural light and open spaces. The new union and science building will follow suit.

This rendering shows what Kansas University's new Central District student union (at left) and integrated science building are planned to look like. Both buildings, located on Irving Hill Road just west of where the recently razed Burge Union stood, are expected to open in time for fall 2018 classes.

This rendering shows what Kansas University's new Central District student union (at left) and integrated science building are planned to look like. Both buildings, located on Irving Hill Road just west of where the recently razed Burge Union stood, are expected to open in time for fall 2018 classes.

An underground path will connect the science building and the union, KU Memorial Unions director David Mucci said. Above ground, the Jayhawk Trail will pass through a green space between the two buildings. Glass-walled buildings are hoped to encourage science building students, teachers and conference-goers or other visitors to come and go freely.

“We expect people to be moving across that corridor,” Mucci said. “The idea is to make them inviting and open to each other.”

This rendering shows how the interior new Central District student union, being constructed to replace Burge Union, may appear.

This rendering shows how the interior new Central District student union, being constructed to replace Burge Union, may appear.

This rendering shows how the interior new Central District student union, being constructed to replace Burge Union, may appear.

This rendering shows how the interior new Central District student union, being constructed to replace Burge Union, may appear.

Central District plans also call for a nearby parking garage. Mucci said that will go up just southwest of the union, and a covered walkway will lead from the garage into the union.

The 1979 Burge Union was razed in late spring. In addition to a ballroom and other meeting rooms, plans call for the new Central District union to house Legal Services for Students, the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center, the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity, a Reflection Room for prayer and meditation, a coffee shop, convenience store and lounge space.

The Burge Union, shown on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, is slated to be razed and rebuilt and part of Kansas University's Central District redevelopment plans.

The Burge Union, shown on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, is slated to be razed and rebuilt and part of Kansas University's Central District redevelopment plans. by Nick Krug

In case you’ve missed past stories, here’s a roundup of other new or coming-soon buildings in and around the Central District. Click them to read more and see pictures.

Central District residence hall and apartment complex

Earth, Energy and Environment Center (Lots more images are on KU's website, here)

Capitol Federal Hall

DeBruce Center

McCarthy Hall (looks-wise, this stone apartment building is an exception)

LEEP2

• Oswald and Self residence halls


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply 18 comments from Mike Green Kevin Kelly Clara Westphal JM Andy David Holroyd Ralph Gage Mn Lindeman Bob Hiller William Pilgrim Tracy Bedell and 1 others

Engineering professor, paleobotanist and piano instructor who recently died taught decades at KU

The Kansas University community recently lost faculty members in engineering, paleobotany and piano who had taught at the university for decades. The three teachers died in April and May.


Nancy Kinnersley, associate professor in the department of electrical engineering and computer science, died May 18 in Kansas City, Kan., at age 71, according to her Journal-World obituary. Services had not been planned.

Kinnersley, who joined the KU faculty in 1989, researched design and analysis of algorithms, graph theory and graph algorithms, and discrete mathematics, according to KU. She was KU Faculty Senate President for the 2013-14 school year.

“Nancy Kinnersley was an outstanding educator, and her service to the electrical engineering and computer science department was exemplary,” Michael Branicky, dean of the School of Engineering, said in a news release from KU. “Through her close association with Engineering Diversity and Women’s Programs as co-adviser to the Society of Women Engineers, she helped provide guidance and support to countless female engineering students.”


Tom Taylor died April 28 at home in Lawrence, at age 78, according to his obituary. A memorial celebration is planned for 3 p.m. June 11 at the KU Natural History Museum.

Taylor, who joined the KU faculty in 1995, was the Roy A. Roberts Distinguished Professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology, and a curator of paleobotany for the Biodiversity Institute and the KU Natural History Museum, according to KU. He is survived by his wife, Edith Taylor, KU professor emerita of ecology and evolutionary biology.

Biodiversity Institute director Leonard Krishtalka said, in a news release from KU, that Tom Taylor, along with his wife, brought “world-class” paleobotany to KU, establishing the university as the global center for research and collections on the evolution of plants and fungi in Antarctica, where he made numerous expeditions. “To quote Isaac Newton, all current and future students of paleobotany and the evolution of plants on Earth will stand on the shoulders of Tom Taylor."


Alice Downs died April 30 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital at age 79, according to her obituary. Services were held in May. She is survived by her husband, Cal Downs, KU professor emeritus of communication studies.

Downs was a KU faculty member for 29 years, teaching piano, according to the obituary. She started playing at age 3, and over the next 70 years performed all over the United States and numerous foreign countries, giving her final concert at KU in 2003. She was passionate about teaching, active in multiple community music organizations and also deeply spiritual.

“Her faith and grace were the resources she drew on to enjoy 10 years of life following paralysis from a stroke which required 24-hour care," her obituary said. "She lived her life with grace and charm and, despite the stroke, she lived the abundant life going to hear the Kansas City Symphony and celebrating good times with family and friends.”


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

KU faculty: Who’s retiring, who got tenure and who’ll be out of the office next year

This time of year, thousands of Kansas University students graduate and enter a new phase of life: the working world. At the same time, there’s a slice of the KU community clocking out of the working world for good — for some after no less than half a century at the university.

KU recently recognized retiring faculty and academic staff members. I’m listing the long-timers here — those who worked at KU 45 years or more, according to the university — but there are many other names on the list many of you KU readers will recognize. To see the entire list of recently recognized retirees, click here for KU’s full press release.

• Gary Grunewald, medicinal chemistry, 50 years

• Allan Hanson, anthropology, 50 years

• Martin Dickinson, law, 48 years

• Don Marquis, philosophy, 48 years

• Zamir Bavel, information processing studies, 47 years

• John Bricke, philosophy, 47 years

• Harold Godwin, pharmacy practice, 47 years

• James Carothers, English, 46 years (See related story here: "Yoknapatawpha, baseball and ‘a good life’: Retiring English professor reflects on 46 years at KU")

• Philip McKnight, curriculum and teaching, humanities and Western civilization, 45 years

Kansas University English professor Jim Carothers, an expert on Faulkner and Hemingway, reflects on his 46-year teaching career at the university after retiring at the end of the most recent semester.

Kansas University English professor Jim Carothers, an expert on Faulkner and Hemingway, reflects on his 46-year teaching career at the university after retiring at the end of the most recent semester. by Richard Gwin

The university also recognized recently retired unclassified professional staff and university support staff. Here are staffers who worked at KU 40 or more years, according to the university. To see the full list of staff retirees, click here.

• Peggy B. Palmer, Campus Administration & Operations SSC, 44 years

• Wesley R. Hubert, Information Technology, 43 years

• Joy E. Sodders, Libraries-General, 43 years

• Ralph Virgil Oliver, Public Safety Office, 42 years

• Bayliss C. Harsh, Libraries-General, 41 years

• Robert H. Marvin, Libraries-General, 40 years

• William J. Pesek, Jr., Information Technology, 40 years

• Tenure time: Also around this time, the chancellor announces promotions and tenure appointments for the upcoming year. This year, 70 faculty members were promoted or tenured at the KU Lawrence and Edwards campuses, and 66 at KU Medical Center campuses, according to KU. To see the full list, click here.

• On sabbatical: KU also recently announced the names of 55 KU faculty members who will be on sabbatical this fall, spring 2017 or the entire academic year. If you don’t see your favorite professor around for a while next year, check this list — he or she might be on sabbatical.

Among those who will be away this fall is Hall Center for the Humanities director Victor Bailey, who plans to work on a book he began researching in 1999 on criminal justice policy in England during the 20th century, according to a recent Hall Center update. Associate director Sally Utech will be acting director of the Hall Center during Bailey’s leave.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

Naismith’s original rules of ‘Basket Ball’ freshly installed, now on view at KU’s DeBruce Center

Kansas University’s DeBruce Center is now truly complete: James Naismith’s original rules of “Basket Ball” — the high-profile acquisition for which the building was constructed — are installed and on display.

The building opened to the public a few weeks ago and the rules were put in place Friday morning, in a flurry of activity that involved removing and reinstalling a wall panel, security system verification and humidity and temperature checks in the display case, said Curtis Marsh, director of the DeBruce Center.

“We had a pretty intense morning,” he said.

Most of the modern, open-concept, glass-walled DeBruce Center is flooded with natural light. But the Rules Gallery — the passageway between the DeBruce Center’s atrium and Allen Fieldhouse where the rules are installed — is darkened by design to protect the historic document.

The two-page, handwritten rules of “Basket Ball” are displayed in a glass wall case along with a small portrait of Naismith. At the press of a button next to the case, the light inside comes up slightly and the voice of Naismith himself begins to play. It’s the only known audio recording of Naismith, a 1939 radio interview that was recently discovered by a KU professor.

James Naismith's original rules of "Basket Ball" are displayed inside Kansas University's DeBruce Center. The display also features a 1939 radio interview of Naismith himself describing how he invented the game, the only known audio recording of Naismith's voice. Quotes from former KU basketball players and coaches, displayed on the opposing wall, are reflected in the glass covering the rules.

James Naismith's original rules of "Basket Ball" are displayed inside Kansas University's DeBruce Center. The display also features a 1939 radio interview of Naismith himself describing how he invented the game, the only known audio recording of Naismith's voice. Quotes from former KU basketball players and coaches, displayed on the opposing wall, are reflected in the glass covering the rules. by Sara Shepherd

In addition to the tiny-by-comparison rules, the gallery features oversize wall displays about Naismith — the inventor of basketball, one of KU’s early basketball coaches and the university’s first athletics director — and legendary KU basketball coach Forrest “Phog” Allen, a contemporary of Naismith’s. There’s also backlit quotes, laser-cut into the steel walls, by other former KU basketball coaches and players.

Visitors look at James Naismith's newly installed original rules of "Basket Ball" on display at Kansas University's DeBruce Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. The low-lit Rules Gallery displays also include quotes from former KU basketball players and coaches.

Visitors look at James Naismith's newly installed original rules of "Basket Ball" on display at Kansas University's DeBruce Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. The low-lit Rules Gallery displays also include quotes from former KU basketball players and coaches. by Sara Shepherd

Current KU basketball coach Bill Self walked up to get his first glimpse of the newly installed rules while I was there Friday morning.

Self said he’d seen the Mona Lisa, a tiny painting that’s one of the world’s most famous, and said the rules display reminded him of that.

“What makes it so cool is how simplistic it is,” Self said. “For those two pieces of paper to have such an impact in our sport is what makes it so special.”

Kansas University men's basketball coach Bill Self gets his first glimpse of the newly installed rules of "Basket Ball" at the DeBruce Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. The historic document, handwritten by James Naismith, was put into place a few hours earlier.

Kansas University men's basketball coach Bill Self gets his first glimpse of the newly installed rules of "Basket Ball" at the DeBruce Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. The historic document, handwritten by James Naismith, was put into place a few hours earlier. by Sara Shepherd

KU alumnus David Booth and Suzanne Booth purchased the rules at auction in 2010 for $4.3 million, a sports memorabilia record according to Sotheby’s in New York City. The $21.7 million donor-funded DeBruce Center opened to the public April 25 and also features a cafeteria, gift shop and lounge space.

The DeBruce Center, 1647 Naismith Drive, has extended hours for commencement weekend. The building will be open until 9 p.m. Friday, from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

The DeBruce Center, 1647 Naismith Drive, on the Kansas University campus.

The DeBruce Center, 1647 Naismith Drive, on the Kansas University campus. by Sara Shepherd


Click here for more photos of the DeBruce center


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply 1 comment from Bob Smith Steve Jacob

Memorial Drive reconstruction project, other summer road closures start Monday on KU campus

If you can find a spot, Memorial Drive is one of the best places to park on the Kansas University campus, I think. Assuming you’re trying to get somewhere on Jayhawk Boulevard, it’s halfway up the hill. Plus it’s peaceful, shady and offers a view of Marvin Grove.

It’s also one of the sketchiest. Jumping a curb to park, no lines between parallel parking spaces, dubiously paved — I once saw a vehicle that apparently overshot the parking slab on a muddy day and slid a car-width down the hill.

Memorial Drive is getting a facelift that will make it significantly less, ah, rustic. The road closes and work begins Monday — the morning after KU Commencement — and will continue over the next two or three summers.

The Memorial Drive reconstruction project calls for slope stabilization, drainage improvements, waterline replacement, improved parking, new pavement and sidewalks and improved lighting, according to KU spokeswoman Erinn Barcomb-Peterson. It also includes adding pavilions for additional future memorials.

The total project cost is estimated at $6 million, paid for by state repair and rehabilitation funds, KU parking funds and some funds from the city of Lawrence (work on West Campus Road at the end of Memorial Drive is included in the project), Barcomb-Peterson said. She said the Phase 1 portion of that cost, the phase happening this summer, is $3.1 million.

I feared the project would take away spaces on Memorial Drive (based on the sketchy edge-of-the-hill situation, and the fact that the recent Jayhawk Boulevard reconstruction project removed all the on-street parking from that thoroughfare). But actually, Barcomb-Peterson said work will add a few, bringing total spaces from 139 to 142. An additional ADA spot and two limited mobility spots account for the increase.

Barcomb-Peterson did say the current parking count of 139 isn’t precise but rather a best-estimate, explaining “the existing parallel spots now have no lines, so it depends on the size of the cars.”

And, I would add, how well they park.

Here is a rundown of Memorial Drive and other summer road closures to know about, according to KU Design and Construction Management:

• Memorial Drive, from the campanile to West Campus Road — Closed Monday until Aug. 21 for street reconstruction. The good news: Jayhawk Boulevard traffic gates will be open during the summer, which should help compensate.

• Intersection of 19th Street and Ousdahl Road — Closed Monday until sometime in August, for intersection improvements by the city.

• Irving Hill Road, from Burdick Drive (by Green Hall) to Engel Road (on Daisy Hill) — Closed Monday until Aug. 14, for Central District construction.

• Mississippi and 11th Streets, next to the HERE Kansas apartment project — Occasional closures Monday through Aug. 12, for street improvements by the city and developer.

• Sunflower Road, from Wescoe Hall Drive to Sunnyside Avenue — Occasional closures and lane restrictions Monday to July 30 for waterline improvements by the city.

Also, while most people have no reason to drive over there, all of the roads that used to lead from 19th Street to the now-razed Stouffer Place apartments are being affected. Ellis Drive is open only to Hilltop Child Development Center Traffic through August. Hopefully you already said your goodbyes to Bagley Road and Anna Drive; both will be permanently closed to the public and are slated to be removed altogether to make way for Central District construction.

Map of summer 2016 street construction on and around campus, via KU Design and Construction Management.

Map of summer 2016 street construction on and around campus, via KU Design and Construction Management. by Sara Shepherd


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply 1 comment from Kevin Kelly

KU adding new position in CLAS, associate dean of diversity and inclusion; honor for McCollum ‘Implosion Team’

I noticed last week that Kansas University is creating a new administrative position for diversity and inclusion, an associate dean of diversity and inclusion. Here’s some more information about that job.

The associate dean of diversity and inclusion will report to and advise the dean of KU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, according to a KU job listing. The search is — or was, as applications are no longer being accepted — internal and open only to CLAS faculty members with a rank of associate or full professor. The selected candidate will spend either three-fourths or half of his or her time on the administrative role of “addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion” and the remainder on faculty duties.

KU spokeswoman Erinn Barcomb-Peterson didn’t give me a specific dollar figure for salary. She said the job will pay the faculty member’s academic-year salary, four pay periods of summer salary plus an administrative supplement as determined by the dean. July 1 is the anticipated start date.

She did explain some about how the position came to be, noting that CLAS is the largest school at KU.

“One of the first actions Dean Carl Lejuez took was to create a working group to identify opportunities to improve diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in the College,” Barcomb-Peterson said. “One of the group’s recommendations was to create an associate dean position dedicated to addressing those issues. The new position will focus both on what can be done within the College and how to partner in efforts from the offices of the chancellor and the provost to effect change across the university.”

Carl Lejuez

Carl Lejuez

Flashback to September, when Lejuez interviewed for the CLAS dean job. In covering his public presentation at KU, I reported that he addressed diversity in the school and said both data evaluation and “creativity” were needed to improve it. During his first semester here, in a move some would probably describe as creative (though he clarified the offer was not limited to student activists or otherwise diverse students), Lejuez gave a pardon of sorts to CLAS students who were on the brink of failing out. Those who agreed to participate in a new faculty mentoring program aimed at helping them improve grades were allowed to stay for a second chance.

I know of two candidates for the new job, though there may be others. The Office of Multicultural Affairs recently hosted informal meet-and-greets for candidates professor Jennifer Hamer and associate professor Shannon Portillo.

• 'Implosion Team' gets award: A lot of things had to come together in some pretty precise ways to pull off the November 2015 spectacle that was the McCollum Hall implosion. Looks like some of the people working behind the scenes got some recognition this month. Last week KU had its annual Employees of the Year awards ceremony, and the 2015-16 Team Award went to the McCollum Hall "Implosion Team." This KU news release names the individuals and talks more about what they did, which included everything from getting used furniture to charities to getting road barriers up to protect the public on demolition day.

KU's McCollum Hall comes crashing down during a planned demolition on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015.

KU's McCollum Hall comes crashing down during a planned demolition on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015. by Richard Gwin


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

KU rape lawsuit moves to federal court; UDK case appears headed for settlement

The case of Daisy Tackett v. Kansas University — filed by a former KU rower who said a football player raped her at Jayhawker Towers — has been reassigned from Douglas County District Court to federal court.

KU asked for the case to be moved because its allegations fall under the Constitution or laws of the United States, according to the notice of removal KU filed in Douglas County court. “Specifically, plaintiff asserts a cause of action pursuant to Title IX … alleging deliberate indifference to sexual harassment and retaliation,” the document says. (Title IX is the federal law that prohibits gender-based discrimination in education. It’s the law that requires universities to investigate and take measures to prevent sexual harassment, including sexual violence, on their campuses.)

Daisy Tackett

Daisy Tackett

The case is now active in U.S. District Court, District of Kansas (in Kansas City), as of April 25. KU has yet to file a response to the allegations Tackett outlined in the lawsuit.

Tackett’s suit, first filed March 21 in Douglas County (story here), said the football player raped her in Jayhawker Towers in fall 2014, and that KU failed to properly investigate and protect her from retaliation by the player and her rowing coaches. She withdrew from KU early this semester and now lives in Florida, where her parents are.

Two other separate but related lawsuits are still pending in Douglas County court. A fellow rowing team member — named in the lawsuit only as Jane Doe 7 — sued KU April 18, alleging the same football player also raped her in Jayhawker Towers in August 2015 and that KU failed to properly investigate and protect her from intimidation by the man and retaliation by her rowing coach. (Click here for the full story on that case.) Tackett’s parents sued KU March 11 under the Kansas Consumer Protection Act, accusing the university of misleading the public by representing campus housing as safe. (Here’s the full story on the parents’ case.)

James Tackett, left, takes questions from reporters on behalf of his daughter Daisy Tackett at a press conference Monday, March 21, 2016, in Kansas City, Mo. Daisy Tackett, who did not appear at the press conference, said she was raped in fall 2014 at Jayhawker Towers and filed a lawsuit against Kansas University alleging KU violated federal Title IX law by creating a hostile environment on campus. Also pictured is Kansas City attorney Tony LaCroix, who is representing Tackett in a separate but related lawsuit against KU.

James Tackett, left, takes questions from reporters on behalf of his daughter Daisy Tackett at a press conference Monday, March 21, 2016, in Kansas City, Mo. Daisy Tackett, who did not appear at the press conference, said she was raped in fall 2014 at Jayhawker Towers and filed a lawsuit against Kansas University alleging KU violated federal Title IX law by creating a hostile environment on campus. Also pictured is Kansas City attorney Tony LaCroix, who is representing Tackett in a separate but related lawsuit against KU. by Sara Shepherd

Just a few weeks ago, two Kansas State University students who said they were raped at fraternities in Manhattan filed Title IX lawsuits against K-State — both in federal court.

• UDK lawsuit headed for settlement? I’ve also been checking on The University Daily Kansan’s lawsuit against KU. The latest news there is that attorneys representing both sides “have reached a tentative resolution of the case and are working to finalize and fully document their agreement,” according to the most recently filed document in the case, pending in federal court.

Such an agreement should resolve the matter and bring “finality” to the case, the document says. Stay tuned for more when it’s available.

In February the student newspaper, spring 2016 editor in chief Vicky Díaz-Camacho and former editor in chief Katie Kutsko sued KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little and vice provost for student affairs Tammara Durham. The Kansan complained that KU Student Senate cut the newspaper’s student fee funding in half for the 2015-2016 school year — from about $90,000 to about $45,000 — based on its content, which they said violated the student newspaper’s constitutional press freedoms under the First Amendment. The suit names the two administrators because the chancellor or designee must ultimately sign off on student fee usage decisions made by the Senate.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

What the chancellor’s veto of Multicultural Student Government funding means for 2016-17 required student fees

So Kansas University Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little has vetoed Student Senate’s decision to fund the Multicultural Student Government for the upcoming year. What happens to the $90,000 the group would have gotten for executive stipends and other expenses?

Nothing. Incoming students will simply pay $2 less per semester in required campus fees, so the Senate won’t have that extra $90,000 to allocate.

The chancellor did not veto any other part of the Senate’s required campus fee package for 2016-17, nor did she shift that money elsewhere, according to university spokesman Joe Monaco. He said the fee package will be presented to the Kansas Board of Regents, minus the $2 fee previously allotted to Multicultural Student Government.

The Senate’s next move regarding Multicultural Student Government remains to be seen, but whatever it is, it’s not going to happen this semester.

Kansas University Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little speaks to the Kansas University Student Senate at the start of the Senate's March 9, 2016, meeting at the Kansas Union. Gray-Little was the invited guest speaker and gave a general update on university issues.

Kansas University Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little speaks to the Kansas University Student Senate at the start of the Senate's March 9, 2016, meeting at the Kansas Union. Gray-Little was the invited guest speaker and gave a general update on university issues. by John Young

Thursday — the day after Gray-Little notified Senate leaders she was vetoing the fee — was the last day of spring classes. The Senate held its last business meeting of the year more than a month ago, on March 30. New student body leaders and representatives for 2016-17 were elected in mid-April and formally took office April 27.

When funding for the Multicultural Student Government was first added into the Senate’s fee package, the timing already was well into the fee allocation process.

The fee package had already been sent back to committee once, and during that committee meeting on March 2 the $2 fee for Multicultural Student Government was added in and a previously recommended $2 fee for The University Daily Kansan was reduced to $1 (there may have been other small edits, but those were the only ones anyone was talking about). The full Senate approved the changes March 9. And on March 30 the Senate voted to give Multicultural Student Government some other powers: allocating the approximately $90,000 Multicultural Education Fund and obtaining equal — 12 — seats on the Senate’s campus fee review subcommittee.

Multicultural Student Government will not have those powers next year, either, according to Senate Communications Director Connor Birzer. Both actions were contingent on the group being formally recognized by the University Governance system.

That has not happened — the main reason Gray-Little cited for vetoing the fee for the group — and may never. I reported more thoroughly on the procedural reasons for that in this April 22 story: "KU Multicultural Student Government faces complex path to transform from student club into equal governing body."

Multicultural Student Government posted an online petition protesting the chancellor’s veto, saying: “The Multicultural Student Government has worked tirelessly to navigate the steps to codify this government and assure the government's future success … This government is a vital resource that marginalized students are requesting due to not being included or served by the current Student Senate.”

Jameelah Jones, center, and Katherine Rainey, right, speak to the Kansas University Student Senate about a proposed Multicultural Student Government fee during the Student Senate meeting Wednesday evening March 9, 2016, at the Kansas Union.

Jameelah Jones, center, and Katherine Rainey, right, speak to the Kansas University Student Senate about a proposed Multicultural Student Government fee during the Student Senate meeting Wednesday evening March 9, 2016, at the Kansas Union. by John Young

The current Senate has a paid director of diversity and inclusion, a standing committee on multicultural affairs and, in addition to seats decided by open elections, a number of appointed seats reserved for representatives from minority clubs on campus. Outgoing and incoming Senate execs, the Multicultural Student Government leaders and the newly released Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Advisory Group report have all said that’s not enough, however, and the Senate needs to do better.

“We remain committed to fostering a student government that is open, accessible, and inclusive to all students,” Birzer said, in a statement on behalf of the incoming Senate.

Senate leaders, Multicultural Student Government leaders and university administrators all have said they expect to be talking over the summer about next steps for their respective groups.


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

Faculty ponder: Do suggested policy changes give KU too much control over employees’ inventions?

Kansas University administration is proposing some revisions to the university’s intellectual property policy, and to the “Employee Invention Assignment Agreement” that goes along with it, which faculty are supposed to sign. Some faculty leaders, however, think the policy gives KU too much control over things its employees invent, or might invent.

Administrators asked KU’s Faculty Senate Executive Committee to review proposed changes and give feedback by last week, but committee members agreed Tuesday they need more time. Incoming Faculty Senate President Pam Keller, professor of law, and incoming University Senate President Joseph Harrington, professor of English, agreed to give it a closer look over the summer.

A notable muddy area is whether KU faculty are considered employees for nine or 12 months of the year, faculty members said. One reason that matters is because some faculty spend summers working or consulting for other companies or even the government.

Faculty Senate representative Ron Barrett-Gonzalez, professor of aerospace engineering, said he and numerous other engineering faculty fall into that category. “They’re laying claim to basically 12 months of intellectual property and they’re only paying nine,” he said, adding that a professor working with a private company on a federal contract, for example, could result in federal and state government “fighting over intellectual property.”

To give you a taste of what they’re talking about, here’s one of the key passages in the suggested revised version of the agreement:

Employee agrees to assign, and hereby does assign, to University all right, title and interest and, where applicable, waives moral rights in and to said Inventions and to any Invention Protection that is filed, issued or maintained thereon, that (a) Employee develops using the University’s equipment, supplies, facilities, time, personnel or trade secrets, or (b) result from work he/she performs for the University, or (c) relate to the University’s actual or demonstrably anticipated research and/or development.

And another passage:

Employee acknowledges that he/she may enter into a consulting agreement that assigns rights to an Invention developed under a private consulting arrangement when such an Invention to be assigned is (a) developed entirely on Employee's own time, (b) makes no use of University equipment, supplies, facility or trade secret information (c) is made in compliance with University polices on intellectual property and consulting, (d) is not based on, improve upon or, to be practiced, does not require the use of an Invention owned by the University (e) arises out of a specific scope of work defined in a written agreement between the Employee and the organization, and (f) if such Inventions are within the specific subject area of Employee’s current and ongoing University research activities, such Employee has received the prior written approval from his/her department chair, school dean, unit director or similar administrative officer to engage in such external research activity and written notice of such approval has been provided to University’s technology transfer office.

Keller said a previous committee researched the issued and determined that such agreements were common at top universities but also that KU’s policy was too broad, and perhaps not clear enough.

“Have they reached the right balance?” she said. “I have some concerns about what they’ve done because it doesn’t seem to follow the committee recommendations from two years ago.”


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

KU’s DeBruce Center now open, temporarily without rules of ‘Basket Ball’

Guess where I had lunch today? Kansas University’s brand new DeBruce Center. It wasn’t a special media sneak-preview this time — on Monday the building opened to all.

DeBruce is still missing its pièce de résistance. James Naismith’s original rules of “Basket Ball” are not yet on display, and the “Rules Gallery” where they’ll be installed — a passageway connecting DeBruce and Allen Fieldhouse — is not yet complete. It’s roped off, with crews still hard at work inside.

Officials with KU Memorial Unions, the entity running the DeBruce Center, have stressed Monday was a “soft opening” and the $4.3 million rules won’t be installed until everything surrounding them is in place, probably several more weeks. (As DeBruce Center director Curtis Marsh put it in my last story about the building, “We are not messing around with those rules.”)

Aside from some landscaping and finishing touches on exterior metalwork, pretty much everything else is in place. A few highlights:

• Protective covering was removed on Friday, and the bronze sculpture of James Naismith is now on view outside the building. It was designed by the late KU professor Elden Tefft and completed after his death by his son, Kim Tefft.

• Custom metalwork is everywhere at DeBruce, inside and out. The exterior of the “Rules Galley” is particularly showy. The tunnel, connecting Allen Fieldhouse and DeBruce, is encased on both sides with steel covered in what looks like oversize, laser-cut lettering spelling out sections of the rules. Crews are still completing a large metal wall with a waving wheat motif outside the building.

• The “Rules Concourse” is just one of the ramps that zig-zag across the interior of this almost completely open-air building. The concourse features a display of KU basketball history, including oversize photographs of some of its most famous players.

• The Original Rules Gift Shop is heavy on KU basketball memorabilia, specifically original rules of “Basket Ball” memorabilia.

• Inside the Courtside Cafe, I immediately ordered a crunchy chicken cheddar wrap, of course. But then en route to the register I noticed I could have gotten a gyro, a banh mi sandwich or even barbecue at the other stations inside the cafeteria. Maybe next time, probably when I go back for my first look at those rules.

Outside KU's DeBruce Center is this bronze sculpture of James Naismith designed by the late KU professor Elden Tefft and completed after his death by his son, Kim Tefft.

Outside KU's DeBruce Center is this bronze sculpture of James Naismith designed by the late KU professor Elden Tefft and completed after his death by his son, Kim Tefft. by Sara Shepherd

Work is ongoing on the "Rules Gallery" inside KU's DeBruce Center, where James Naismith's original rules of "Basket Ball" will be displayed. The gallery connects DeBruce with Allen Fieldhouse.

Work is ongoing on the "Rules Gallery" inside KU's DeBruce Center, where James Naismith's original rules of "Basket Ball" will be displayed. The gallery connects DeBruce with Allen Fieldhouse. by Sara Shepherd

The "Rules Concourse" leading to the "Rules Gallery" inside KU's DeBruce Center. The big man on the right is KU basketball legend Clyde Lovellette, one of several famous KU figures featured in the historical display.

The "Rules Concourse" leading to the "Rules Gallery" inside KU's DeBruce Center. The big man on the right is KU basketball legend Clyde Lovellette, one of several famous KU figures featured in the historical display. by Sara Shepherd

The Original Rules Gift Shop inside KU's DeBruce Center features KU memorabilia, particularly original rules memorabilia.

The Original Rules Gift Shop inside KU's DeBruce Center features KU memorabilia, particularly original rules memorabilia. by Sara Shepherd

Just inside the main entrance of KU's DeBruce Center is a coffee shop (right). Open seating is pictured at left.

Just inside the main entrance of KU's DeBruce Center is a coffee shop (right). Open seating is pictured at left. by Sara Shepherd

The exterior of the "Rules Gallery" connecting KU's DeBruce Center (right) with Allen Fieldhouse.

The exterior of the "Rules Gallery" connecting KU's DeBruce Center (right) with Allen Fieldhouse. by Sara Shepherd

The Courtside Cafe on the lower level of KU's DeBruce Center.

The Courtside Cafe on the lower level of KU's DeBruce Center. by Sara Shepherd

The Nutrition Kitchen for student athletes on the top level of KU's DeBruce Center.

The Nutrition Kitchen for student athletes on the top level of KU's DeBruce Center. by Sara Shepherd

KU's DeBruce Center is open Monday through Saturday.

KU's DeBruce Center is open Monday through Saturday. by Sara Shepherd


— I’m the Journal-World’s KU and higher ed reporter. See all the newspaper’s KU coverage at KUToday.com. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com, by phone at 832-7187, on Twitter @saramarieshep or via Facebook at Facebook.com/SaraShepherdNews.

Reply

loading...