Posts tagged with Hasimage

What happened with Lawrence police on ‘COPS’? A recap

If you missed seeing the Lawrence Police Department on COPS Monday night, here’s a synopsis of what happened — which will probably take you about as long to read as it would to watch the LPD portion of the episode on DVR. (I didn’t even have time to finish my glass of wine before COPS moved on from the two featured local calls to some guy getting caught with a bunch of psychedelic mushrooms in Colorado.)

The episode, “Late Night Shopper,” kicks off with a scene-setting shot of an officer cruising down a dark and pretty dead-looking Massachusetts Street, when he gets a call about a burglary in progress just two blocks away.

Inside the Discount Tobacco shop at 15 W. Ninth St., officers find a man inside the shop, which is closed with the door apparently busted in and the alarm apparently dismantled. The man (who does not appear totally lucid) bolts toward the back of the store, officers tackle him next to a case full of glass pipes and bongs, put him in handcuffs and into a police car. He tells officers he “just wanted a cigarette,” and gets told he’s being taken to jail with a suggestion to get some help.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

Scene two features another officer in his cruiser when a call comes in for a vehicle pursuit east of town. The vehicle — a purple Chevy pickup — was reportedly involved in a hit-and-run at the Casey’s in Eudora. Officers eventually stop the truck on what looks like K-10 and order the driver out of the car at gunpoint. In the back of the patrol car, the suspect asks for a lawyer.

His female passenger, however, talks plenty. She says she just met the driver earlier that night at a “campsite,” then they stopped by a trailer park before going to Casey’s. She says she saw and heard lights and sirens and told the driver to stop — yelling and hitting him in the process — but the driver insisted, “I’m runnin’!” She’s uncuffed and told the police will get her a ride back to town, while the driver heads for jail.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

A still image from an episode of COPS featuring the Lawrence Police Department that aired Jan. 29, 2018.

COPS is on Paramount (formerly Spike), and if you’re looking for the re-run, “Late Night Shopper” is Show 3024. Cops.com has a little spotlight feature on featured LPD Officer Tracy Russell here and an episode teaser video here.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

Reply 4 comments from Dorothyhoytreed Touringdriver Thomas Moore Curtis Lange

Police called on suspicious person offering ‘free-throw advice’ at KU men’s basketball dorm

University of Kansas police were called to the men’s basketball dorm Wednesday afternoon, where a man reportedly kept showing up to give a resident there some “free-throw advice.”

The call about the man "wanting to give free-throw advice" came in about 3:30 p.m., but when police got to McCarthy Hall, the man — who's not a KU student — had already left, KU police Deputy Chief James Anguiano said. For that reason, at least as of about an hour after the call, police didn’t plan to file a trespassing or other criminal report, Anguiano said. (Radio traffic indicated the man had been there multiple times that day before the police were called, and may have come back again just before 5 p.m. Note: Subject's clothing description included a blue and red windbreaker.)

Anguiano said the name of the intended recipient of the man’s advice was not relayed to him by the officer on scene.

However...

In the final 3:37 of the KU’s 85-80 loss to Oklahoma Tuesday night in Norman, Oklahoma decided to repeatedly foul Udoka Azubuike, sophomore center from Nigeria, in hopes he’d miss his free throws. And the strategy played out just like Oklahoma wanted.

Azubuike — shooting an abnormally low .375 from the free-throw line — went 1 for 8 in free-throw shooting for the game. In the final 3:37 he went 0 for 6.

— Journal-World and kusports.com staff contributed to this report.

Kansas players huddle around Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) before a one-and-one during the second half at Lloyd Noble Center on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 in Norman, Oklahoma.

Kansas players huddle around Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) before a one-and-one during the second half at Lloyd Noble Center on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 in Norman, Oklahoma. by Nick Krug


UPDATE:

KU coach Bill Self joked about the incident while meeting with the media Thursday.

None by Matt Tait


— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

Reply 2 comments from Scottschoenberger Maxine2020

More information on why charges weren’t filed from October rape reports at KU dorm

I now have a bit more information about the Douglas County District Attorney’s Office decision not to file charges from a woman’s report that two men raped her in October in her University of Kansas dorm room.

Two male KU students were jailed Oct. 21 after the female student reported that two acquaintances raped her in her room at Downs Hall, 1517 W. 18th St., at different times earlier that morning, a Saturday. Allegations were that the men had sex with someone who was too intoxicated to give consent, according to initial KU crime report entries. The men were released from jail the following Monday morning without being charged. 

Cheryl Wright Kunard, assistant to DA Charles Branson, provided some information, in an email response to questions from the Journal-World, about why the DA’s office decided not to file charges.

In one case, “the victim advised a witness that the sex act was consensual,” Wright Kunard said.

In the other case, the DA’s office requested follow-up investigation from law enforcement but, after receiving the follow-up, determined it would be unable to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a crime had occurred, Wright Kunard said. “Additionally,” she said, “the victim advised investigation that she did not want to pursue charges.”

Cora Downs Residence Hall on the campus of the University of Kansas.

Cora Downs Residence Hall on the campus of the University of Kansas. by Nick Krug

I didn’t get the DA’s office response in time to include it in my Dec. 22 story reporting the conclusions of the cases. When they responded the next business day, I was out of the office for the week. But I think the information is worth sharing, if belated.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

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Accused thief back in jail, less than two weeks after being freed by jury

Matthew Reynard’s freedom was short-lived.

Less than two weeks after a jury acquitted him in a theft case and he was released from jail for the first time in months, Reynard got arrested again this week on suspicion of … theft.

Reynard, 37, of Lawrence, was booked into jail early Tuesday morning on suspicion of theft, shoplifting, criminal use of a financial card and possession of stolen property, according to jail records.

A four-hour crime spree preceded that arrest, police say. According to Officer Drew Fennelly, a spokesman for the Lawrence Police Department:

Just before midnight, a purse was stolen at a downtown drinking establishment. About 1 a.m., police were dispatched to Walmart, where someone was trying to make a large purchase with credit cards suspected of being stolen — and turned out to be from the purse taken earlier. Before officers arrived, the suspect left Walmart, also taking merchandise that wasn’t paid for.

About 4 a.m., police were dispatched to Checkers grocery store, where a suspect was trying to make a large purchase with stolen credit cards. Officers caught the suspect there and found him in possession of the credit cards from the purse and the merchandise from Walmart.

In July, Reynard was charged with stealing thousands of dollars in equipment from an animal lab at the University of Kansas. On Nov. 9, he was released from jail after a jury found him not guilty of the charges: one count of burglary and two counts of theft, all felonies.

Matthew C. Reynard

Matthew C. Reynard

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

Reply 3 comments from Bob Smith Chris Johnson Dorothyhoytreed

Robbers reportedly target KU student walking on campus late at night, steal his cookies

Three men allegedly attacked a University of Kansas student walking on campus late Friday night and stole not his backpack, phone or money but "his Hot Box cookies,” according to information from KU police.

Two cookies — which the victim was carrying in a box — were stolen, said Deputy Chief James Anguiano of the KU Office of Public Safety. He said the cookies were valued at $5.

The robbery allegedly occurred between 10 and 10:45 p.m. Friday in the 1300 block of Hoch Auditoria Drive, near Anschutz Library, according to the KU police crime log. It was reported to KU police about 11:45 p.m.

The victim reportedly was jumped on and pushed to the ground, but was not injured, according to a Crime Alert KU police sent out early Saturday morning. The suspects were described as three white males with brown hair, dark shirts and dark pants. Two were approximately 5 feet 10 inches tall, and the third about 5 feet 5 inches.

Anschutz Library, 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive on the Kansas University campus.

Anschutz Library, 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive on the Kansas University campus. by Sara Shepherd

Anyone with tips about the crime is asked to call KU police at 864-5900 or KU Crime Stoppers at 864-8888.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

Reply 4 comments from Clara Westphal Dorothyhoytreed Bob Smith Dowser

Drivers, be aware of deer: Mating season means more animals in roadways

I’ve seen quite a few deer on my drive into work lately on the Kansas Turnpike — one on the back of a trailer, a couple in the median about a car-length from each other, and one right in the middle of my lane (well, part of one).

Luckily I wasn’t the driver who turned any of those deer into roadkill, but unfortunately someone else out there did. It’s that time of year, authorities say, when deer are most likely to be out on the road.

Kansas typically sees the highest number of deer-vehicle crashes in mid-November, when the “rut” — or mating season — peaks, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol. Also in the fall, deer are increasingly active seeking new food sources and shelter, as their habitat transforms with crops being harvested and leaves falling from trees and shrubs.

A deer crosses a road north of Lawrence during the morning of Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014.

A deer crosses a road north of Lawrence during the morning of Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014. by Richard Gwin

Some numbers:

• The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office has been handling on average four or five deer-related crashes a day in the past couple weeks, the office said in a Facebook post this week.

• 10,235, or 16 percent, of all 62,150 vehicle crashes reported in Kansas in 2016 were deer-related, according to Kansas Department of Transportation figures shared by the highway patrol. In those crashes, seven people were killed.

• Douglas County had 262 deer-related crashes in 2016, in which 14 people were injured, according to the highway patrol.

And some safety tips for drivers, from the Turnpike and other authorities:

• Be especially cautious from sunset to midnight and shortly before and after sunrise. This is when deer are most active.

• If you see one deer, watch for others. They seldom run alone.

• At night, use high beams when there’s no oncoming traffic.

• To frighten deer away, slow down and blow your horn with one long blast.

• Avoid exaggerated maneuvers to avoid a deer in the road. “If you are unfortunate enough to have a deer enter the highway in front of your car, it is best to hit the animal and not swerve to avoid it,” highway patrol Lt. Adam Winters said, in the news release. “Often we find more serious crashes occur when you swerve to miss the deer, potentially losing control of your vehicle, leaving the road or veering into oncoming traffic.”

• If you do hit a deer, pull over on the shoulder or nearby parking lot, turn on your flashers and call law enforcement, the sheriff’s office suggests. Stay buckled up, but if you must wait outside your car stand as far away from the road as possible. Leave the deer alone, law enforcement will handle it.

A deer alert factsheet from the Kansas Turnpike Authority.

A deer alert factsheet from the Kansas Turnpike Authority.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

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Lawrence’s ‘harming plants’ law in action

In Lawrence there’s a law against harming plants. And every once in a while I’ve seen people arrested and booked into jail on suspicion of violating it. Here’s one recent incident that happened on the University of Kansas campus, although in this case the alleged plant-harmer is still at large.

Last week, according to the online KU police crime log, someone reported that a vehicle went off the road overnight, did some doughnuts and damaged the grass near the Library Annex, 1880 Westbrooke St. over on West Campus. The case is still open, according to the crime log.

Not that I’m not curious, but being pretty busy covering things like murder and rape cases I haven’t dug into any of the other harming-plants arrests to see what they were about. The ordinance appears it would cover everything from angrily ripping up your neighbor’s flower bed to stealing a snack from a fruit tree that isn’t yours (unless it belongs to the city).

Here’s the city’s ordinance against harming plants, a category of criminal damage to property:

No person shall willfully injure or destroy any plant, tree, vine, or flower, the property of another, standing on or attached to the land of another, or shall pick, destroy, or carry away therefrom or in any way interfere with any part of the flowers or fruit thereof; except that this section shall not prohibit the picking or carrying away of the ripe fruit of any tree, plant, or vine on any property owned by the City of Lawrence; provided, however, that no ripe fruit of any tree, plant or vine located in a public right-of-way or leased to another party shall be so picked or carried away.

Rain falls on flowers on the University of Kansas campus Monday, May 16, 2016, as a passerby with an umbrella walks in the background.

Rain falls on flowers on the University of Kansas campus Monday, May 16, 2016, as a passerby with an umbrella walks in the background.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

Reply 5 comments from Doyle Coons Notwhatyouthink2 Carol Bowen Ken Lassman Mikegant

Drug Take Back Day is Saturday; dump your expired, unused medications safely at 2 locations in Lawrence

Got expired or unused prescriptions and over-the-counter medications? Law enforcement is planning an event that could spur you to declutter your medicine cabinet — and, more importantly, to help keep those drugs out of the wrong hands.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, as part of a national initiative, is planning a Drug Take Back Day this weekend. Unused or expired prescription and over-the-counter drugs will be collected from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at two locations: inside Hy-Vee at 4000 W. Sixth St., and in the parking lot on the east side of the downtown Law Enforcement Center, 111 E. 11th St. (near the intersection of 11th and Rhode Island streets).

Veterinary drugs will be accepted, but the sheriff’s office cannot accept inhalers, needles or other sharp objects. There is no charge, and dropoff is anonymous.

Studies show a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including home medicine cabinets, according to a news release from Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt. Additionally, traditional methods for getting rid of unused medicines — flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash — pose potential safety and health hazards and should be avoided.

“Unused medications are dangerous for kids, pets and the environment,” Schmidt said. “Diversion of opioid painkillers, in particular, can contribute to the misuse of these drugs that has become a serious nationwide problem. Getting leftover medicines out of the medicine cabinets and safely destroyed keeps them from falling into the wrong hands.”

At Douglas County’s last Drug Take Back Day, in April, the sheriff’s office collected nearly 1,000 pounds of medications. According to the attorney general’s office, since the program began in 2010, more than 58 tons of unwanted meds have been collected and destroyed statewide.

None


— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

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Saturday morning pancake feed will help firefighters’ charity efforts

This summer I wrote about a group of firefighters mobilizing to help Irma Blair, the widow of the first firefighter to die on duty in the 127-year history of the Lawrence Fire Department. Blair’s husband, Mark Blair, died at age 34 fighting a house fire in 1986. More than 30 years later, firefighters are helping Irma Blair as she undergoes treatment for cancer.

That group of firefighters is the Lawrence Professional Firefighters Charitable Foundation. Blair’s case is just one of the efforts the foundation has undertaken since recently forming as a formal nonprofit.

For those of you who like pancakes on Saturday mornings, here’s an opportunity to get some for a good cause.

The Foundation is planning a “Hotcake Chow Down” from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday at Freddy’s Frozen Custard, 2030 W. 23rd St. It’s an all-you-can-eat breakfast for $5 plus any additional free-will donations.

Foundation Chairman Tim Reazin, a firefighter who’s also the mayor of Eudora, said the foundation also has built a ramp for a disabled firefighter and supported Muscular Dystrophy Association, Relay for Life and the Special Olympics. The group’s Facebook page is at facebook.com/Lawrence-Professional-Firefighters-Charitable-Foundation-177182009354565/.

Volunteers organized by the Lawrence Professional Firefighters Charitable Foundation work on the Lawrence house of Irma Blair. Blair is the widow of Mark Blair, a Lawrence firefighter who was killed on duty in 1986.

Volunteers organized by the Lawrence Professional Firefighters Charitable Foundation work on the Lawrence house of Irma Blair. Blair is the widow of Mark Blair, a Lawrence firefighter who was killed on duty in 1986.

— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

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Whose rims are those? Police share surveillance photos of suspect vehicle in ATV thefts

Thieves reportedly made off with a couple of utility vehicles and trailers from businesses on a busy Lawrence street, and police are seeking the public’s help in figuring out who they are.

The first theft was reported July 30 and occurred sometime over the previous night, Lawrence Police Officer Drew Fennelly said. Two Kubota utility vehicles — the kind that look like ATVs with roll-cages over the seats — and a flatbed trailer were taken from McConnell Machinery Co. at 1111 E. 23rd St. The stolen items are valued at about $27,500.

The second case happened about 5:30 a.m. July 31, Fennelly said. A flatbed trailer, valued at about $1,000, was stolen from Kaw Valley Industrial at 1105 E. 23rd St.

“We believe it was the same suspects in both incidents,” specifically three males, Fennelly said.

Police are sharing surveillance photos of a suspect vehicle in hopes someone will recognize it, Fennelly said. They're not great quality photos — the SUV is barely in the frame — but a key characteristic does show up: As Fennelly put it, that would be the SUV's “distinctive” metal rims.

None by Lawrence Police

Anyone with information may call police at 830-7430 or Crime Stoppers of Lawrence and Douglas County at 843-8477 (TIPS).

This surveillance photo from the Lawrence Police Department shows a vehicle suspected of being linked to the thefts of ATVs and trailers from businesses on 23rd Street in July 2017. Police note that the time stamp on the image is not correct, however.

This surveillance photo from the Lawrence Police Department shows a vehicle suspected of being linked to the thefts of ATVs and trailers from businesses on 23rd Street in July 2017. Police note that the time stamp on the image is not correct, however.


— I’m the Journal-World’s public safety reporter. Reach me by email at sshepherd@ljworld.com or by phone at 785-832-7187. I’m also on Twitter, @saramarieshep.

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