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A visit to Cuba

By Richard Gwin · May 18, 2009 · Comment on this

Lawrence Journal-World photographer Richard Gwin recently attended the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution in Havana. During the May Day celebration, the streets began to fill at 6 a.m. as more than 1 million Cubans joined to march for the Revolution.

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Comments

Boeing 5 years, 7 months ago

Cuba's a beautiful place, and the people are great. Luckily I have dual citizenship with a country more friendly with Cuba so I got to go, and want to go back, but I recommend anyone to go if they get the chance, and if relations open up.

martyoh 5 years, 7 months ago

Great video, Richard! I bet it was really exciting to experience the celebration.

Flap Doodle 5 years, 7 months ago

Pity that Cubans don't have the same freedom to travel that we do.

Bobo Fleming 5 years, 7 months ago

Four legs good- two legs bad- except the pigs.

Orwell- Animal Farm

Read it

guesswho 5 years, 7 months ago

Doesn't seem like we have freedom to travel to Cuba. Bit ironic, huh? Although we can visit other communist countries like China and Vietnam. What is with the double standard?

Also, it doesn't seem like the embargo has really worked all that well over the last 60 years. Maybe we should try something new.

Sean Livingstone 5 years, 7 months ago

"guesswho (Anonymous) says… Doesn't seem like we have freedom to travel to Cuba. Bit ironic, huh? Although we can visit other communist countries like China and Vietnam. What is with the double standard?

Also, it doesn't seem like the embargo has really worked all that well over the last 60 years. Maybe we should try something new."

If you ever remember, China and Vietnam never ever threatened the US with anything like Cuba and Soviet Union. That is the reason for restriction in travel. Vietnam was invaded by the US, China and US never touched each other, and always have normal and most of the times, friendly relations.

Flap Doodle 5 years, 7 months ago

Looks like Fidel's attempts to export Marxism over the past 40 years have pretty much been epic fails. Maybe he should try something new.

guesswho 5 years, 7 months ago

livingstone, I understand the Cuban Missile Crisis, but I thought the embargo was to try and take away Castro's power. Could you help me on this (and I am not trying to be sarcastic here). I do believe the Cuban people have suffered under Castro, but keeping the embargo really seems pointless at this point.

But, for whatever reason (the embargo, Marxist leanings, etc), Cuba has done some amazing things with vaccines and health care that we don't hear about. Many Cuban doctors go to other less developed countries to help out, Cuba has the same health outcomes as our country and spends a ton less - I am not saying we need to go to that system at all but it doesn't hurt to see what we can adopt from other countries.

http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129s/cgi-bin/blogs/whoimplements/2009/05/07/what-can-cuba-and-china-teach-us-about-implementing-public-health-part-i/

lazz 5 years, 7 months ago

Amazing images as always, Richard, THANKS

Sean Livingstone 5 years, 7 months ago

"guesswho (Anonymous) says… livingstone, I understand the Cuban Missile Crisis, but I thought the embargo was to try and take away Castro's power. Could you help me on this (and I am not trying to be sarcastic here). I do believe the Cuban people have suffered under Castro, but keeping the embargo really seems pointless at this point.

But, for whatever reason (the embargo, Marxist leanings, etc), Cuba has done some amazing things with vaccines and health care that we don't hear about. Many Cuban doctors go to other less developed countries to help out, Cuba has the same health outcomes as our country and spends a ton less - I am not saying we need to go to that system at all but it doesn't hurt to see what we can adopt from other countries.

http://stanford.edu/class/humbio129s/…"

I understand. Normal Cubans never really threatened the United States, but Castro did. It's the same as Al-Qaeda, or any other nations that threatened the United States. Until the "threat" is removed, i.e. Castro, progress beyond the existing "norm" is always difficult.

On the other hand, China and Vietnam have never threatened the US, communist China threatened Taiwan and US made a commitment to protect Taiwan, so indirectly, China is only threatening a commitment by the US. Vietnam's threat on the US is even more remote. As long as the military is no longer present in Vietnam, they'd care less about what the US is doing. So, there's no Castro to remove in China and Vietnam, so even if both countries are communists, it's business as usual.

Keeping the embargo is no good, however, what else can the US do back in those days? Embargo has been proven ineffective, but there isn't a simple approach to remove Embargo, it's like slapping the President on his face... somehow endorsing the fact that the President who implemented this is wrong.... not a nice thing to do. Cubans are suffering, it's the same with Iraq and Saddam Hussein, and Saddam never once threatened the United States. In order to remove the embargo, Saddam needed to be removed, since he threatened neighboring countries.... embargo rarely worked, but removing it is also a challenge. So, a normal approach is to keep things as it is.

I hope this is clearer...

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