thinkinganalytically

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Fort Hays State banks $1.5M yearly from China

Perhaps KU is more expensive because it does more. FHSU has "over 60 majors", while KU has "over 190 majors".

July 3, 2012 at 3:08 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents give green light to KU for tougher admission standards

@irtnog2001

Do you know what percentage of KU undergraduates are taught by graduate students? Could you let us now about the class size? Without that sort if information, we really can't take this comment seriously.

June 22, 2012 at 9:46 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

KU tuition and fees going up; admission standards getting more stringent

Really? How do you think capitalism works? Firms will increase prices when it is to their advantage to do so.

June 21, 2012 at 2:06 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

KU names three new distinguished professors

@alcaholbliss,

Actually at least one of the newly named distinguished professors routinely taught more classes in the year then required by his/her contract. That is perhaps one of the reasons for the promotion.

@jimincountry

It is better to think of the money as an increase in salary that comes with a promotion. If you want people to work hard for any institution, you should reward them. If going above and beyond does not get recognized at KU, these hard working people will find another institution that will recognize their work.

June 19, 2012 at 7:16 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents to consider tuition, admissions, expansions

Ops, that should be 30% a year, not 40%.

June 19, 2012 at 2:14 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents to consider tuition, admissions, expansions

In state tuition at KU is $8,634, tuition at Princeton is $38,650. KU's tuition would have to go up by 40% a year for each of the next five years to catch up to Princeton's tuition, assuming that Princeton did not increase tuition for the next five years. Do you really believe that KU will increase its tuition by 40% a year or do you have no idea how much tuition is at the two schools?

June 19, 2012 at 1:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Regents to consider tuition, admissions, expansions

A couple of comments about your points.

1 and 2: if KU is a business, it should set it's tuition to maximize revenue, so if you are correct about that point, KU should not necessarily take your advice about the first two points. I might even argue that KU charges too little for tuition, the evidence being that students seem to be in no hurry to graduate. Doubling the cost would focus their attention on getting through.

4. If KU had standard first year students, KU might be able to offer standard first year programs. Some incoming undergraduates are superbly prepared, bringing in over a years worth of college credit when they enroll on campus. Other first year students should not have been admitted at all, and likely should have not graduated from high school. You can not put both groups in the same classes.

5. College Algebra is really a high school class, so it makes sense to have high school teachers teaching the class. The large enrollment classes in math at KU, Math 002, Math 101, Math 103, Math 104, Math 105, Math 106, Math 109, Math 110 are all really high school classes, and even the calculus classes, Math 115, Math 116, and Math 121 can all be taken as AP classes in high school. Have the math faculty teach courses that their years of training have uniquely equipped them to teach.

6. In 2010 the median level of debt for a KU graduate was 0, that is over half of KU graduates (52%) graduated from the university debt free. As for being an elite school, well, KU's admission standards are no where near that level, even if the regents approve the proposed higher admission standards. What KU offers for students is the opportunity for an excellent education if the student is aggressive and motivated. Most KU students are neither.

June 19, 2012 at 1:11 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Heard on the Hill: USA Today releases lists of athletic department spending; KU author Laura Moriarty pens new book; researcher finds being outside helps you think better

If you are going to claim tuition as a benefit from athletics to the university, then the contribution of the athletic corporation does not come close to the benefit provided by non-NCAA athletics at Kansas and a small fraction of the benefits provided by non athletes.

When you say net benefit, do you mean the difference between the payment of tuition to the university and the cost to the university of educating NCAA athletes or did you leave the cost part out of the calculation?

May 30, 2012 at 11:01 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Heard on the Hill: USA Today releases lists of athletic department spending; KU author Laura Moriarty pens new book; researcher finds being outside helps you think better

Jack,

Money is fungible. Tax dollars that go to pay for administrative costs, utilities, etc. free up non-tax dollars to pay coaches. You are making a distinction that is not meaningful.

The real injustice is that some students are forced to take out loans in order to pay student fees to support the athletic corporation. It is a transfer from the relatively poor to the relatively rich.

May 30, 2012 at 10:55 a.m. ( | suggest removal )