Advertisement

superwizbang (Ken Schmidt)

Follow

Comment history

Fans gather, wait overnight, for Late Night in the Phog

As a Williams Fund member, you would know from your Annual Membership Guide that approximately 584 members donated $10,000 or greater last year. Those members are allowed two tickets, if they RSVP'd and were able to attend. That number would equal 1168 total free tickets at most for this program. Given that the total Field House capacity is 16,300, that leaves 15,132 unclaimed seats. I do not have the ability estimate and/or deduct saved seats such as for the band or family members. While I will not justify the treatment that past donors received when Lew implemented the current points system today, I will say it is the system the University has chosen to stand by.

The monetary sacrifices that your father made as well as any donation received, whether large or small, comes as a gift borne from hard work. As I am sure you might attest, just because a donation of $10,000 seems like a large amount, not everyone in that list of 584 can just open a checkbook and sign that payment without pause. It comes with dedication and desire to keep our program strong. It is the same passion that drives a person to give free time to help others in need--when they might be doing something more selfish.

You do not know, it is possible, as a surgeon, that your father is quite acquainted with me and my family. Likewise, you might be a familiar patient too. All the same, I find it nice that once per year, the University makes an effort to say thanks. All the same, there are 16,300 seats in Allen Fieldhouse and that will not change. The true debate is only beginning; how admission for Late Night next year is handled will be determined by the outcry we saw last night. Yes, I agree that it is unfortunate that the Las Vegas graduate did not get in, but we have all waited in those lines and know there is the possibility of the doors being locked. It is unlikely the availability of the extra assigned seats would have changed that reality this year.

October 5, 2013 at 10:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fans gather, wait overnight, for Late Night in the Phog

Elliott, thank you for your reply. Unfortunately, you might be unaware of what this family does for other charities as well; not the least of which has anything to do with money, but rather actual time and physical service.

October 5, 2013 at 4:04 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fans gather, wait overnight, for Late Night in the Phog

There are some who have been attending Late Night for long before you were born, possibly. The glory of this event is that it is open to everyone. In many cases, those older alums are the ones, who through very generous donations (equal to or greater then $10,000) help pay for the scholarships and salaries of coaches like Self who keep our program one of the premier locations to attact great players such as Andrew Wiggins. There are not many of these tickets and they are not courtside or even in the first levels. There are some perks such as better parking for events and such, but in essence, a ticket to Late Night is the greatest of these. The spots are located in sections 15/16/17 on the second or third level. I feel it is nice to receive a small token for giving back to the University instead of buying a new car, taking a grand vacation or installing a new home theatre, *every year*...without regards to records, player/coach names or demanding any further special treatment. Yes, I enjoyed a reserved seat tonight, but like you, I have waited overnight in the past to get in. I have also worked very hard each year to make sure I can support *our* university in a way that makes us proud to call ourselves Jayhawks. On late nights when I have to make sacrifices for my family to earn an income which also helps supports this program, it is nice to know that I can make it after work with the knowledge I can watch the fruits of that sacrifice. I hope this makes sense.

October 4, 2013 at 11:44 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Donor pays $130,000 to keep Jayhawk collection with the Kansas Union

Agreed. With the amount of money spent in many other areas, sometimes I wonder. All the same, the generosity of these wonderful "family" members assures that enjoyable collection remains where it belongs. It would be further more enjoyable to see it become organic and continue to grow with contributions from the community over time. It means something to see the passion of one person grow and bring so much to many, many future generations. Thank you Ascher family!

September 19, 2013 at 11:43 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Lineman Stowers finds right path at Kansas

As well as every day of the week. This is why we give money to support the University. It's not all altruistic, but I want to know that I can help the folks get a degree who are interested in making something of their lives. Keon, I hope life continues to bless you both inside and outside of the classroom. Continue to make the best of the gift so many work hard to afford you. Go out and then make a difference for the kids who will need your story.

August 4, 2013 at 10:34 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Environmentalists say provision in House-approved farm bill would make it easier to build coal-burning Sunflower plant

You chose only one election. I think if you continue to review, the price of gas--not oil as your first reply indicates--falls each time there is an election, or each time that congress tries to quell the masses by promising to designate a committee to review pricing. In each instance, and only a few months later, refining companies report record profits while we return to status quo gouging. This is not a party issue, its a politician issue. The direct benefactors are those who use the lobby dollars to win reelection.

July 18, 2013 at 11:34 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Environmentalists say provision in House-approved farm bill would make it easier to build coal-burning Sunflower plant

Your reply is in jest, correct? Surely you are not suggesting that the left is to blame for high oil prices as well as recent sticker shock for utilities. I do not think anyone can blame one side or another for those. Oil prices are commodity based, energy too for that matter, albeit in a more muddled manner. Refining oil and private-entity "public utilities" are big business; truly, they have become the largest business players in the country and their lobby powers exceed all but the most prodigious Washington entities. The rhetoric of blaming one side or another for our monthly bills should stop. These companies need to be held accountable...not only for their pricing, but for how they do business. This *DOES* include the impact they have on economy-of-life scales as well. If you are interested, review what impact coal-fired plants had along the Pigeon River in Tennessee to the mountains and their inhabitants in North Carolina twenty years ago. These plants had near impunity to act outside of ecological regard and spent years pointing fingers as their acid rains nearly cleared whole forest ranges. Moving forward with developing our own self-sufficiency in energy production *must* remain at the forefront of our political agenda, but not at the expense of our nation's well being. The two should be married, not disassociated while big business pads their coffers with unregulated abandon.

July 18, 2013 at 11:27 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Environmentalists say provision in House-approved farm bill would make it easier to build coal-burning Sunflower plant

Equally as curious was the push to have this permit issued before environmental statutes were placed. According to the Bird Conservation Network, "at least 100,000,000 birds" are killed by windows in items such as homes or cars each year; a number far exceeding those found killed by turbines (even if the two numbers were statistically normalized). Using your logic, should we therefore choose to stop building houses with windows or cars with windshields. I will not begin to refute your argument regarding "internal parts" as you obviously have little knowledge regarding what those "parts" might be. As far as solar plants and night, again, you are improperly read. Newer solar plant design, as described by the government's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and in service for the Sevilla region of Spain, have the ability to transfer energy to superheat a salt composition and continue energy production throughout the night.

Your point regarding jobs and the benefits of driving interstate commerce has tangible validity, it would also be wise to consider the environmental impacts of such a project before merely throwing caution to the, "wind." There was a reason that the environmental standards were agreed upon by a bipartisan group of legislators. Big business *does not* have your best interests in mind and will not study the impact of your well-being if not forced to do so.

July 17, 2013 at 1:22 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City Hall targets property on Memorial Stadium grounds for transit center

Woah, now that is the dumbest idea I have heard from the city yet. *HOW* is that location centralized. As an avid tailgater, I can vouch for how difficult it is already to get good tailgating spots without donating $25K to WEF each year. Now you take 50 or 60 spots away and push those people out to other lots? How about bus traffic trying to get through on gameday. I won't even begin to talk about the pollution, whether environmental or noise in nature which the students will have to suffer. It seems that in this plan, for this location, the city is merely saying, 'eh, who cares--its just the students and they leave each year--they don't matter!' Crazy.

June 21, 2013 at 1:24 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

WOW to begin work later this month on upgrade to boost Internet speeds in city

AMEN! Very well said. Although you might cut the whole first paragraph and simply state the last three sentences. *WHY* can't companies get this? You will need the infrastructure soon. Why not install it now and tout being ahead of the game rather than a member of service provider "status quo?"

June 5, 2013 at 11:37 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Previous