streamfortyseven (Hudson Luce)

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Kansas Democratic Party disavows, condemns attorney general candidate Sarah Swain for poster showing lassoed police officer

The Kansas Democratic Party ought to just give up and call it a day. This isn't the first time they've sabotaged candidates - for example: "When I had heard this, I at first believed it was a joke. That is, until Liz Dickinson Snyder, a candidate who ran for District 30 announced she was running on a cold weekend from the state house steps. Liz, a bisexual woman who worked hard in her district found herself suddenly outflanked, as the state party informed her she would face a primary challenger, a Republican who would switch to be a Democrat just to make sure she didn’t win the nomination. The Johnson County Democratic Party recruited an anti-choice, anti-gay opponent to run as a Democrat in a primary until he was outed. When that happened, the Party made an effort to say "You'll get state help over my dead body". Liz Dickinson, who I profiled here, and wanted to support, raised minimal to no money in Kansas - and donors told us openly they were told 'not to give'." https://m.dailykos.com/stories/2014/1...

June 19, 2018 at 2:49 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

As outrage mounts, Trump digs in on immigration amid family-separation crisis; administration refuses to apologize

Unless you've been living in some kind of bubble for the last 25 years or so, it's because the employers don't have to pay workers comp, unemployment insurance, Social Security, and Medicare taxes. They can also screw undocumented non-citizens out of their wages or pay them half of the minimum wage. If the employers couldn't do that, if the laws were enforced as they should be - and the workplaces were required to be OSHA-compliant - the undocumented would cost the same as citizens to hire, except they wouldn't know any or at least as much English, and they probably would be less educated, than US citizens. Should the US employers be "busted"? Of course they should, they should be made to pay workers comp, pay for their employees' medical care for work-related injuries, unemployment insurance, Social Security, and Medicare (and these latter two could go to Mexico which has similar social insurance programs) - and for triple any differential in wages, except for the case where wages are stolen, in which case the worker would be entitled to ten times the amount of wages withheld from them, plus ten thousand dollars in punitive damages, per employee, looking back five years. So, yeah, the employers should be "busted".

June 19, 2018 at 12:27 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

As outrage mounts, Trump digs in on immigration amid family-separation crisis; administration refuses to apologize

Finally, the solution is for the UN High Commission for Refugees to intercept the refugees before they get into the cartel-controlled areas in the first place. It's obvious that the US is not accepting requests for asylum from people from Central America, South America, or Africa. Like it or not, that's the policy. And UNHCR/Mexico - http://www.unhcr.org/en-us/mexico.html - should repatriate the people in those shelters to UNHCR facilities in Mexico. In the last year, 80,000 people have tried to come across the border - including families with children - illegally. We already have enough problems with people who are native citizens - structural, long term unemployment, the opioid epidemic, homelessness - taking on additional people who probably don't speak English, lack education and job skills, and are therefore unemployable just adds to our problems, making a bad situation worse. We need to take care of our own before we can consider taking in such refugees. Unemployment for black youth in the 18-24 age range is 50% - and the refugees will be competing with them for jobs. Same case for the whites who are unemployed in the former steelworking and coal-mining areas in the US, who are killing themselves by opioid addiction and outright suicide. Reduce those unemployment rates to 5%, then we can consider taking on new people. Otherwise, it's simply irresponsible, letting new people in without any sort of adequate provision for them, when we fail to take care of the ones we already have.

June 18, 2018 at 9:32 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

As outrage mounts, Trump digs in on immigration amid family-separation crisis; administration refuses to apologize

A number of things come to mind:

1. First, the US is not like Nazi Germany. It's nowhere close. If you want to read a Shirer book, have a look at "Berlin Diary". It's Shirer's diary entries from 1932 to 1939, while he was a foreign correspondent there for one of the major radio networks in the US. Alternatively, you could look at Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will", www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHs2coAzLJ8. We are *nowhere* close to that. Nowhere. It's ridiculous hyperbole.

2. The President has the legal authority to deny admission to any aliens, or group of aliens he so chooses - including Mexican and Central American refugees - and this has been law since 1952 - 66 years ago: "(f) Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President:
Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate." https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/8/1182 If you don't like it, campaign to get it repealed. Otherwise, today he clearly and unambiguously stated that he does not intend for Mexican and Central American refugees to enter the US. Period. No request for asylum will be granted. As long as 8 USC 1182(f) is in effect, he has that absolute and discretionary power.

3. Mexico has lost control of its northern provinces to the drug cartels. "The cartels determine who goes in at a port of entry and decides who goes in outside of a port of entry." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDljS... at 4m10 to 4m25s. This means that the northern border of Mexico is no longer in control of the Mexican government, but is being controlled by the drug cartels, who strip immigrants of their money and may either kill or enslave them. The fact that Mexico has lost control of its northern border to an armed paramilitary organization - which controls the *entire* border by force of arms - represents an armed threat to the United States and should be met by US or UN military action to do what the Mexican government is incapable of doing or is incompetent to do so. The US policy of separating parents from children is abhorrent, but the border under control of an armed paramilitary organization is a far greater threat. Deal with that, and a lot of the refugee troubles will go away - they can be resettled in Mexico, a Spanish-speaking country, by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees.

June 18, 2018 at 9:30 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kobach enjoying provoking reaction again, this time with fake machine gun

Might be a useful modification with all of the deer out on the roads, just light 'em up, no more problem. But seriously, what are his policy stances as compared to Colyer's? That's what I'd like to know about, instead of this theatrical fluff.

June 7, 2018 at 12:15 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Investigators: Driver shot by Lawrence police was initially stopped for seat-belt violation, altercation ensued

Actually, the witness talked to the LJW reporter, not LKPD, so it's not their story. And the witness was interviewed minutes after the incident took place - the shooting happened 50 feet away from the front door of the LJW: ""A witness told the newspaper that he saw the incident right in front of him as he was stalled in traffic on Sixth Street. He said he saw a police officer standing next to the open driver’s side door of the SUV, speaking to the person inside. Suddenly, he said, the driver jumped out of the SUV “with both fists swinging at the officer,” and the two went to the ground right in front of the witness’s car." By attacking the officer like that - and taking the officer down, the driver considerably heightened his own risk - and he compounded his legal difficulties as well, making a potential misdemeanor out of what would have been a traffic infraction or perhaps just a warning.

June 2, 2018 at 5:30 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Investigators: Driver shot by Lawrence police was initially stopped for seat-belt violation, altercation ensued

"A witness told the newspaper that he saw the incident right in front of him as he was stalled in traffic on Sixth Street.

He said he saw a police officer standing next to the open driver’s side door of the SUV, speaking to the person inside. Suddenly, he said, the driver jumped out of the SUV “with both fists swinging at the officer,” and the two went to the ground right in front of the witness’s car."

The guy pulled over came out of his car with both fists swinging, and either knocked or took the officer to the ground. That officer is lucky that the second officer showed up, he could have lost his gun to his assailant, and this story might have had a different outcome. This isn't about an unarmed black guy sitting in his car being executed by police, it's a black guy armed with his fists attacking the police - over a seat belt violation, which is at worst a ticket and usually a warning. The reaction by the driver is totally out of proportion to a simple traffic stop, and it's the sort of thing which prompts police to be very much on edge when doing traffic stops - which decreases the safety of all concerned.

May 30, 2018 at 2:33 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Gunman opens fire at high school near Houston, killing 10

Straight off, first-person shooter video games - every school shooter has been addicted to these games. Research has been done - https://www.killology.com/trained-to-...

May 20, 2018 at 1:27 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Gunman opens fire at high school near Houston, killing 10

A couple of days ago, I got this from a facebook friend, here in Kansas: ""May 16 at 2:53pm
Your kid gets bullied at school.

You tell him to ignore it, and that he is above that sh*t.

Your kid tries but the prolonged effect of that kind of abuse begins to show in his schoolwork, home life, and budding social skills.

Obviously something must be done. But violence is wrong. You talk to the bullies parents but they say their child has an innate right to treat your child that way.

You tell him to stay away from that kid but it turns out, the bullying left unchecked has shown other children this is okay behavior, and now over half of the class participates knowingly or otherwise in the bullying of your child.

Teachers are now frustrated with your child's failing performance in class, and begin to treat him differently as well. They don't think they are, but it's obvious they are starting to subconsciously pick up cues from the class about how to treat your baby.

Finally, your child, after almost a year of abuse, hits a child who bullies him. This bully is taken aback and doesn't understand why this clearly okay behavior has been punished. He tells an adult and your child is punished for violence.

This sends a message to the children that it is okay to abuse your child, and it is not okay for your child to combat that in anyway. It also sends that message to your child, and he internalizes it.

Your child is the victim of prolonged violence that is systemically supported and has no course of action besides "ignore it" which is psychologically impossible. It will affect who he becomes and how he thinks of himself compared to the worth of others.

Violence is so much more than physically hurting someone and if you are going to condemn it, start with the systemic violence towards marginalized people, not with the marginalized people who have been backed into a corner for 200+ years with no recourse outside of "let it happen, shh shh."

May 18, 2018 at 5:08 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

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