streamfortyseven (Hudson Luce)

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Police and fire put together list of more than $33 million in funding needs for 2016; Sprouts sets new opening date for Lawrence store; former KU basketball player says deal is near on wing restaurant

Here's an excerpt from an article which Mr Heckler and Mr Williams, as well as others, might be interested in:
"In economic terms, the "place entrepreneurs" at the center of the growth coalitions are trying to maximize "rents" from land and buildings, which is a little different than the goal of the corporate community -- maximizing profits from the sale of goods and services. As sociologists Jonathan Logan and Harvey Molotch explain:

Unlike the capitalist, the place entrepreneur's goal is not profit from production, but rent from trapping human activity in place. Besides sale prices and regular payments made by tenants to landlords, we take rent to include, more broadly, outlays made to realtors, mortgage lenders, title companies, and so forth. The people who are involved in generating rent are the investors in land and buildings and the professionals who serve them. We think of them as a special class among the privileged, analogous to the classic "rentiers" of a former age in a modern urban form. Not merely a residue of a disappearing social group, rentiers persist as a dynamic social force. (Logan & Molotch, 1987.)" http://www2.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/...

April 20, 2015 at 10:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Police and fire put together list of more than $33 million in funding needs for 2016; Sprouts sets new opening date for Lawrence store; former KU basketball player says deal is near on wing restaurant

Lawrence is growing westward more so than eastward. The Lecompton exit is 10 miles from the eastern part of Topeka where growth is occurring, so Lawrence and Topeka are more likely to merge.

April 20, 2015 at 10:39 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

School district may increase property taxes to offset expected state funding cuts

But there is a limit to how much people can charge for their services - even unionized public employees. The limit gets imposed by voters, for public employees. They elect legislators and governors who will impose funding cuts. And if the schools and teachers' unions decide to sock it to people who pay property tax, if they hit hard enough, they'll find that limits exist there, too. The fact is, is that you *do* need the approval of the "anti-teacher" crowd, because the more that people have to pay, especially in a recessionary economy, the more of them will *become* "anti-teacher" with painful consequences for you and your cohort.

April 15, 2015 at 1:06 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

School district may increase property taxes to offset expected state funding cuts

Other commenters might have similar conflicts as well - just a few picked out at random: Dorothy Hoyt-Reed is a high school Spanish teacher in USD 458 (http://www.usd458.org/blhs/dhoyt-reed/); Paul Youk is a professor of Sociology at KU (http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowR...); Jeff Plinsky is a teacher of English and Debate at USD 497 (http://www.usd497.org/Domain/1287)

April 14, 2015 at 9:19 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

School district may increase property taxes to offset expected state funding cuts

As long as Dave Trabert is being accused of conflict of interest, it should be noted that at least one of the people contesting Trabert's data has a similar conflict of interest: "David Reber teaches High School biology in Lawrence, Kansas. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from the University of Kansas, and a Master of Science Degree in Education from Emporia State University. In addition to teaching, David is active in state and local politics with interests in school finance, curriculum, and content standards. David has represented Kansas teachers as an elected delegate to both state and national level assemblies." http://www.examiner.com/k12-in-topeka...

April 14, 2015 at 8:55 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Soden, Boley, Herbert win seats on Lawrence City Commission; two incumbents voted out

Actually, not. This group of leaders just caters to a different set of "special interests" than the ones you support, the ones who have ruled the roost for the past twenty-five years. This time, the people of Lawrence, who are being made to pay for all this corporate welfare, are going to have their voices heard - and acted upon. I'll bet some research into the current bonded indebtedness of the City of Lawrence for all of these projects, coupled with the tax breaks which act to shift the tax burden onto the people, will reveal some troubling data, which will require appropriate action to set right.

April 7, 2015 at 11:24 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

Condoleeza Rice, the National Security adviser and later Secretary of State for the Bush/Cheney Administration, had *two* American black parents, not a white mother and a black Kenyan father like Obama. This racial analysis thus fails. At certain levels, race fails to be an issue, it's merit, education, intelligence, and character that matter.

February 16, 2015 at 3:28 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

There's a significant difference - being conquered is an act of lawlessness and serves to abrogate any existing social contract. There is a moral duty to oppose the conqueror and to re-establish the rule of law through whatever means necessary. On the other hand, losing an election means that the rule of law was complied with and the social contract and its rule of law remain in force.

February 16, 2015 at 3:22 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

Sam Brownback doesn't make the laws, the Legislature makes the laws. He's responsible in part for executing the will of the Legislature - the Executive Branch regulatory agencies, operating under a delegation of power from the Legislature, are responsible for the other part. If the Governor commits unlawful actions, he's subject to impeachment and removal from office by the people through the Legislature. He is responsible for his feasance or mis-, mal-, or non-feasance, not the people. Wherever did you get such ideas?

February 16, 2015 at 3:16 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Attendance and revenue numbers at Rock Chalk Park recreation center off to good start; city still struggles with super fast broadband issue; new beer festival coming to downtown

And, of course, Provo's effort was sabotaged by corporate interests in the state legislature, in this case, Comcast and Qwest, who sought to protect their cartelized semi-monopolies: "Though Provo originally wanted to offer television, telephone, and Internet services directly using its trusted reputation in the community, the state legislature bowed to pressure from Comcast and CenturyLink (then Qwest) to limit local authority and tilt the playing field in favor of two distant corporations (that have still largely failed to invest in the networks needed by Utah communities). Provo was forced to use a wholesale-only business model. That approach is rarely used today by communities that seek to build out the entire community at once because it is very difficult to generate enough revenue to pay the full costs of the network." http://www.muninetworks.org/content/g...

February 14, 2015 at 1:13 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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