Advertisement

streamfortyseven (Hudson Luce)

Follow

Comment history

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

Condoleeza Rice, the National Security adviser and later Secretary of State for the Bush/Cheney Administration, had *two* American black parents, not a white mother and a black Kenyan father like Obama. This racial analysis thus fails. At certain levels, race fails to be an issue, it's merit, education, intelligence, and character that matter.

February 16, 2015 at 3:28 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

There's a significant difference - being conquered is an act of lawlessness and serves to abrogate any existing social contract. There is a moral duty to oppose the conqueror and to re-establish the rule of law through whatever means necessary. On the other hand, losing an election means that the rule of law was complied with and the social contract and its rule of law remain in force.

February 16, 2015 at 3:22 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Saturday Column: Congressional debates reflect lack of trust in Obama

Sam Brownback doesn't make the laws, the Legislature makes the laws. He's responsible in part for executing the will of the Legislature - the Executive Branch regulatory agencies, operating under a delegation of power from the Legislature, are responsible for the other part. If the Governor commits unlawful actions, he's subject to impeachment and removal from office by the people through the Legislature. He is responsible for his feasance or mis-, mal-, or non-feasance, not the people. Wherever did you get such ideas?

February 16, 2015 at 3:16 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Attendance and revenue numbers at Rock Chalk Park recreation center off to good start; city still struggles with super fast broadband issue; new beer festival coming to downtown

And, of course, Provo's effort was sabotaged by corporate interests in the state legislature, in this case, Comcast and Qwest, who sought to protect their cartelized semi-monopolies: "Though Provo originally wanted to offer television, telephone, and Internet services directly using its trusted reputation in the community, the state legislature bowed to pressure from Comcast and CenturyLink (then Qwest) to limit local authority and tilt the playing field in favor of two distant corporations (that have still largely failed to invest in the networks needed by Utah communities). Provo was forced to use a wholesale-only business model. That approach is rarely used today by communities that seek to build out the entire community at once because it is very difficult to generate enough revenue to pay the full costs of the network." http://www.muninetworks.org/content/g...

February 14, 2015 at 1:13 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Attendance and revenue numbers at Rock Chalk Park recreation center off to good start; city still struggles with super fast broadband issue; new beer festival coming to downtown

Actually they get free 5 Mbps service for seven years with a single activation fee of $30, the $70 per month is for gigabit service, so Sam Crow's comment is somewhat misleading. "Google will also be covering residents’ costs, as Provo households have reportedly been paying $5.35 a month on top of their utility bills regardless of whether they used iProvo. ... In addition to Fiber, Google will offer its free 5 Mbps Internet service for any homes in Provo for a single $30 activation fee, and no monthly charge for at least seven years. Google Fiber, of course, will offer download speeds of up to 1 Gbps for $70 a month for gigabit Internet, and $120 a month for gigabit Internet and TV service.
“We [will] also provide free Gigabit Internet service to 25 local public institutions like schools, hospitals and libraries,” Google Fiber said.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/google-fiber-u...

Note that Google is a profit-oriented business and expects to make a profit from this arrangement using infrastructure built ten years prior. It's an example of privatization of a public utility and may have more to do with incentives offered to politicians than to actual perceived need.

February 14, 2015 at 1:05 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Attendance and revenue numbers at Rock Chalk Park recreation center off to good start; city still struggles with super fast broadband issue; new beer festival coming to downtown

Chanute, Kansas, whose city motto is "A Tradition of Innovation", has 30 miles of gigabit fiber installed as part of its municipal broadband effort - http://ks-chanute.civicplus.com/index... I'm sure it's quite possible for Lawrence to do likewise, and elevate itself above the fray of monopoly-seeking commercial interests.

February 12, 2015 at 11:56 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Crews demolish buildings on the site of Berkeley Flats apartments, in the 1100 block of Mississippi

Waste is a part of the nature of capitalism - the notion of time value of money - and I'm sure that's what is driving this. Otherwise they'd take the time to salvage the air conditioning units, the windows, the fixtures inside the building, and other recyclable material, leaving the shell to be demolished and hauled off to the dump. But it's a lot quicker to just put the whole thing in the landfill - a couple of days of work - slap up the new building, and get in paying tenants. Like a lot of other "progressive" things in Lawrence, recycling is window dressing, a joke.

January 31, 2015 at 3:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Haskell seeking information about vandalism to sacred sweat lodges

The people who did this are the same kinds of people who spraypaint swastikas on synagogues - and they ought to be treated in the same way. I hope they're caught before there's an escalation of the harms caused.

January 28, 2015 at 10:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

New two-lane Wakarusa roundabout may be a little confusing at first, but it's safer, city official says

There's a three-lane roundabout at Meyer Boulevard and Ward Parkway in Kansas City, and it's been there since I can remember, which is a bit more than 52 years at this point. I can recall that it was challenging during drivers' ed classes, especially at rush hour, and there are *no* stop signs on that one, either. It was challenging then, but eventually I got used to it. Four lanes, two in, two out, of traffic from Meyer, six lanes into it and six out, from Ward Parkway, Tomahawk Road, and some other street - so it could be complex.

January 28, 2015 at 11:41 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Kansas ethics official doesn't appear before grand jury in Brownback loan case

Jonathan is correct. If she went in and testified and lied or concealed, *then* it could be perjury or obstruction of justice. If the head of the Kansas Governmental Ethics Commission gets cited for contempt by a federal grand jury - that would be interesting, we'll see if that actually happens. If it does and a finding is entered, it'll be funny if she keeps her job... On the other hand, I wonder if she has some sort of qualified immunity she can assert and refuse to testify.

January 15, 2015 at 3:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Previous