streamfortyseven (Hudson Luce)


Comment history

KU professor who used n-word in class discussion is placed on leave

Your last sentence - was the pun intended?

November 23, 2015 at 7:35 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

KU professor who used n-word in class discussion is placed on leave

Is she made out of wood?

November 23, 2015 at 7:31 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Profiles of the three candidates vying to be Lawrence's next city manager

Bremby got fired because he had the guts to say "No" to the new coal-fired Sunflower Electric Cooperative generating plant at Holcomb, KS, due to the ultrafine particulate matter air pollution which would be produced by the plant, the location of the unlined ash pit for the 18 million tons of fly ash and other waste to be produced (directly over the Oglalla Aquifer), and the composition of the soil - water-permeable dune sand. He was replaced by a more pliable KDHE head, who approved the plant. At the time of Bremby's decision, it was national news and there was a lot of pressure on him to approve the plant and the millions of dollars of profit the plant would produce for the shareholders of the utility - and he resisted the pressure. That's why he got fired.

November 23, 2015 at 7:21 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Letter: Health care costs

Not true for middle-income or poor taxpayers, true for taxpayers making above about $80,000 each:

November 12, 2015 at 10:57 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Editorial: Street surprise

Putting bike traffic on a truck route is a disaster just waiting to happen, bike route markers or not. There'd have to be a physical separation to make it safe. Also see "The Door Zone" in this: "Simply stated, if you shoehorn a bike lane into a narrow street with parking, the bike lane will be in the door zone, where car doors can -- and do -- fling open at unpredictable moments. These accidents are dismayingly common. Quite a few fatalities have been documented. For more than 30 years, the safety literature has warned cyclists to avoid riding in the door zone. But now we use our tax dollars to pay for traffic control devices that instruct us to ride in the door zone! This is a sad situation. The city of Cambridge Mass. installed door zone bike lanes on several busy streets with narrow lanes, including Massachusetts Avenue, despite warnings that they were unsafe. The bike lane shown in Fig. 6 proved fatal for Tufts University graduate student Dana Laird in 2002. If you look carefully at the photo, you can see that the open car door blocks almost the entire bike lane. There is not room to avoid the door without encroaching into the motor lane. (Remember, a bike is about 2 feet wide. There is less than two feet between the open door and the left stripe.)"

See also this study of bicycle usage of truck routes in Seattle:

November 4, 2015 at 2:57 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Gov. Brownback reshuffles hundreds of state workers

It would be embarrassing if the truth were known, that the "study" was written out on cocktail napkins and the backs of used envelopes, and that the whole mess ended up in the landfill with used coffee filters and food scraps... which I think is a possible scenario.

October 2, 2015 at 1:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

City Commission decides to interview six remaining candidates at special meeting Thursday

"The city of Lawrence has a population of nearly 93,000, and yet on any given Tuesday, City Hall hosts fewer than 30 residents at the weekly meeting. As a seated commissioner, what are your plans to engage those in the community who do not attend the meetings in the process?"

When controversial issues have come before the Commission, the existing seats have been taken quickly, leaving people to stand in the chambers and outside in the hallway. People don't like to stand around for hours on end, and so they don't bother to come the next time. There's an easy fix, though: Move the meetings to the Lawrence Arts Center auditorium.

September 30, 2015 at 4:45 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Schmidt steps aside from judicial funding case; asks Supreme Court to do the same in a related case

Article III Section 2 US Constitution: "In all cases affecting ... those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction."

If the Kansas AG doesn't want to take the case, it looks like the US Attorney's Office would be the appropriate place to go, and the case would be heard before the US Supreme Court.

The majority opinion in US v More (1805) might provide some guidance: "Cranch, joined by Marshall, sustained More's demurrer based on the Compensation Clause of Article Three of the United States Constitution.[58] That clause provides: "The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts . . . shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services a Compensation which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office." "

September 20, 2015 at 4:46 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Who's the most famous person you've ever seen in Lawrence?

I seem to have done my "hanging out with famous people" gig in Gainesville, FL where I was in grad school at the time. Black Flag was touring in a van, doing shows in rec halls and houses, and so we hung out with Henry Rollins and Greg Ginn and drank beer; Descendants, same case, except coffee instead of beer; NOFX, playing a yard show, hanging out with Bobby Peterson, ex-keyboards for the McCoys ("Hang On Sloopy"), drinking Bo Diddley's beer; Tommy Stinson, getting so drunk on our beer that we had to carry him into the club where the "Placemats" were supposed to be playing, propping him up in a chair, he'd play a few notes then flop over, play a few more notes... they ended up not playing but it was a great night anyway; and a few others. But in Lawrence, I met Bill Shockley at his abortive speech at KU, Allen Ginsberg and William S Burroughs in the KU Bookstore in 1981 or so - and I was absolutely tongue-tied - what *do* you do when you see Burroughs and Ginsberg walking right down the aisle towards you?, Aron Kay of the Yippies in 1976, Seymour Hersh in the 2000s.

September 6, 2015 at 2 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Documents shed light on ties between KU teacher and Koch Foundation

The article makes it perfectly clear what is going on here: "A University of Kansas lecturer testified at a Senate hearing in 2014 against Kansas’ renewable energy standards after a KU institute he leads received thousands of dollars from a Koch Industries-funded foundation to conduct research on the standards, emails show. Art Hall, a KU lecturer and director of the university’s Center for Applied Economics, wrote in a Nov. 25, 2013, email that the Fred and Mary Koch Foundation had agreed to spend $40,000 in 2013 on the center’s payroll.According to an IRS disclosure report filed by the Fred and Mary Koch Foundation, Koch Industries — which is involved in petroleum production — is the organization’s sole contributor. Hall’s email was sent to Laura Hands, Koch Industries’ community affairs director. The renewable energy standards, also known as the renewable portfolio standards, required Kansas electric companies to produce 20 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2020. Gov. Sam Brownback and the Legislature were successful in making the standards voluntary this year after failed attempts at repeal in previous years. Those attempts included a 2014 legislative push to get rid of the standards. Hall testified in favor of repeal at a Senate hearing in March 2014, after his center had produced Koch-funded research on the standards. Hall said in an email to a reporter that the testimony was the only published work that came from his investigation into the standards."

Note the last sentence: "Hall said in an email to a reporter that the testimony was the only published work that came from his investigation into the standards." Real institutes, like Cato, Heritage, American Enterprise, and Mises, to name a few, produce research which is published in regular peer-reviewed journals. The only "published work" Hall has produced was testimony before the Kansas Legislature.

No wonder they didn't want to produce the emails, this guy is a paid lobbyist for Koch Industries, operating under (false) cover of a KU Professorship, running a one-person "institute". If KU had the least shred of academic integrity, they'd dump this guy, instead, they're just a bunch of corporate whores. A change in leadership there is obviously needed, and an apology to Kansas taxpayers, who are at least partly on the hook for this charade.

September 2, 2015 at 2:15 p.m. ( | suggest removal )